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Author Topic: Z3100 Print Care  (Read 2689 times)
Charlie B
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« on: April 12, 2007, 09:10:06 PM »
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When Epson first came out with their Ultachrome Inks, they recommended placing prints under sheets of plain paper for a couple of days before framing to prevent a film from forming on the glass from the inks' glycol or something. Aside from the concern for acid in the paper, is this something that should be done for the Z3100  prints when they are to be framed soon after printing?
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Charles Gast
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2007, 09:25:56 PM »
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The prints should remain free to dry for at least a week. Using a mat so that the print does not come in contact with the glass of course is important. Some folks would tell you to air dry them for a month (or four) but I usually just air dry for at least a week, then printshield and another couple days of drying before mounting. I know one fine art printmaker was using special shelves and letting his prints on photorag "cure" for about a year in a dark room before coating and framing. That is the extreme end of the scale.   I am curious as to what the sheet of paper layed on the print is for.
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Charlie B
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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2007, 09:34:49 PM »
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The prints should remain free to dry for at least a week. Using a mat so that the print does not come in contact with the glass of course is important. Some folks would tell you to air dry them for a month (or four) but I usually just air dry for at least a week, then printshield and another couple days of drying before mounting. I know one fine art printmaker was using special shelves and letting his prints on photorag "cure" for about a year in a dark room before coating and framing. That is the extreme end of the scale.   I am curious as to what the sheet of paper layed on the print is for.
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As I remember, it was to draw the glycol out of the ink.
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Charles Gast
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« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2007, 07:59:10 AM »
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As I remember, it was to draw the glycol out of the ink.
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So it was to sponge it out? I guess it would require a weight on top of it to keep firm contact.  It is the first I have heard of that.
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Jim Cole
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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2007, 08:58:31 AM »
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Charles,

Weights were not necessary. It was more of an evaporative process.

Those of us who have used RC papers with the Ultrachrome inks became aware of this problem early on. If the prints were not dried under paper for several days, the offgassing after framing would badly fog the glass if the framed print came into contact with any direct sunlight. This is a big problem at art fairs where the artist cannot control the light hitting the pieces as well as he can at home or in a gallery.

Just search an Epson Printer forum for outgassing or fogging and you will get book loads of discussion.

Jim
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Jim Cole
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rdonson
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2007, 08:58:45 AM »
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So it was to sponge it out? I guess it would require a weight on top of it to keep firm contact.  It is the first I have heard of that.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=112189\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I think it was to capture what was out gassed rather than to actually soak it up by direct contact.
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[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
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cogden
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« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2007, 08:32:53 PM »
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Interesting responses - thanks.

However, I think the original poster was asking about the new Z3100.

Does anyone know if the "outgassing problem" is still an issue with the Z3100 and its inks (esp. on glossy paper behind glass at outdoor art shows)?
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Charlie B
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« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2007, 09:36:11 AM »
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Interesting responses - thanks.

However, I think the original poster was asking about the new Z3100.

Does anyone know if the "outgassing problem" is still an issue with the Z3100 and its inks (esp. on glossy paper behind glass at outdoor art shows)?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=112774\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
This topic was originally started because I had an order for 100+ prints to be printed on HP Premium ID Satin Photo paper, mounted, matted and shrink wrapped for resale. I wanted to know if anyone knew if outgassing might leave a film on the shrinkwrap. Hoping to assure a film wouldn't occur, I did place the prints under paper for two days. Will keep check with the customer to see if any filming occurs. Additionally, will frame a few with only air drying for about a week to see if it occurs then. Will post results over time. I really don't know how soon to expect filming if it is to occur. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Charlie
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