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Author Topic: The B/W side of Antelope Canyon  (Read 5018 times)
julian kalmar
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« on: April 16, 2007, 12:41:00 AM »
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All images are made from 3-4 different exposures







http://photoart.lima-city.de/
« Last Edit: April 16, 2007, 04:11:15 AM by julian kalmar » Logged
wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2007, 01:11:00 AM »
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Nice work.  Thanks for sharing!

Mike.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2007, 08:42:32 AM »
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Very nice!
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larryg
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« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2007, 10:35:18 AM »
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My first thought was why would you want to eliminate all those great colors. but this works and is very interesting.
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nikonjim
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2007, 05:48:45 PM »
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Very nice and interesting abstraction.  I assume you started with B&W film, since converted digital color would not have that range.  Seems to me to be a very nice way to handle the large brightness range inherent to the location.  On my one visit, several years ago, I tried to use a digital camera and it simply did not have the range.   These days, I think I would try to do bracket exposure color exposures, then the expanded dynamic range capabilityof Photoshop.  Just trying to think ahead a bit
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jnaneshwars
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2007, 09:26:02 PM »
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Great b/w shots!!
But I am sure it would look better in colour.
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picnic
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2007, 09:56:53 PM »
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Quote
Very nice and interesting abstraction.  I assume you started with B&W film, since converted digital color would not have that range.  Seems to me to be a very nice way to handle the large brightness range inherent to the location.  On my one visit, several years ago, I tried to use a digital camera and it simply did not have the range.   These days, I think I would try to do bracket exposure color exposures, then the expanded dynamic range capabilityof Photoshop.  Just trying to think ahead a bit
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=113687\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I think he did do that---he stated 3-4 exposures.  I like it.  I've seen many many color images---and so this was something different--and I like it very much (I am a mono person though LOL).

Diane
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julian kalmar
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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2007, 05:30:17 AM »
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I assume you started with B&W film, since converted digital color would not have that range.  [a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=113687\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
These are all made with 5d but I do not convert the colour image in normal way (PS channel calculation...)
To make them B/W I like to open them in Rawshooter and wipe all saturation and try to make the unsaturated (B/W) image as good as possible in Rawshooter and open it in PS. Of course some parts of the image are not so good. For this parts I make corrections in Rawshooter for exposure vallue and levels and then open  a second image in PS. Normaly I have to do this 3 to 4 times and then I take from every layer what I need to make the complete image perfect.
Due to my bad English this may read a little complicate but this works verry well and quickly.
What I like on this method is the perfect control what happens and you get a result you don`t have to correct afterwards. With all the other methods of PS you always have to correct and there are so many ways to convert a colour image to B/W in PS, that it is very hard to decide wich works best for each image.
What I have to do when the image is finished: convert them to grayscale and reconvert to RGB. This is because there are always some single, slightly saturated pixles left and this wipse them all. I do reconverting to RGB because Windows ( perhaps only on my computer) shows the grayscaled picture darker then the reconverted RGB picture. I have no idea why
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Don Libby
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« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2007, 01:54:07 PM »
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Very nice ...
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Richowens
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« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2007, 07:29:24 PM »
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Julian,

Your English is better than many whose native language is English. Your workflow has been stated very nicely.

As to the photos, superb........a refreshing change from the many color shots from there.


Rich
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