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Author Topic: Which Lens for Landscapes  (Read 7986 times)
Goodlistener
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« on: April 28, 2007, 08:51:56 AM »
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May I have experienced advice abut which might be a good lens for large vista type landscape photography?  My body is a Canon XTi which is the small sensor APS-C size.  I prefer Canon brand lens and already have a 35mm prime, which is a good start at least.


My work is on www.pbase.com/goodlistener if anybody want to "take a peek".
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2007, 11:14:09 AM »
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Really depends on what you want to do with the large vistas.  Last time I was out at such a place I was shooting with my tokina 12-24 and my friend was shooting with his 100-400.  Obviously we were seeing different things.

If you're comfortable stitching images that 35 could work nicely.

Canon 10-22 is well regarded.  I like my tokina 12-24 but it is high on the CA.  If I was buying today and I couldn't find a deal on the canon 10-22 I'd get the sigma 10-20.  The 15mm fe is very sharp and (depending on how you shoot) doesn't necessarily have to be defished in PTlens or photoshop.

(I think they are all reviewed at slrgear.com.)
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kombizz
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2007, 05:58:12 AM »
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Usually I use my 105-300 for landscape.
It depends what would you see and what would like to shoot !
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2007, 08:58:15 AM »
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I use the 70-200/2.8L IS and stitch. Do you intend to stitch multiple frames together, or are you planning on only using single-frame captures?
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Don Libby
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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2007, 11:00:38 AM »
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Using my 1Ds Mk II I shot with everything from a 15mm up to 500.  It all depends on where you are, what you see, and what you want finished print to portray.  Now that I'm into MF I shoot anywhere between 35 and 210.

Listen to the images in your head.


Cheers
« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 11:01:51 AM by Iron Creek » Logged

Goodlistener
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« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2007, 04:45:12 PM »
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Thanks DarkPengin. I looked into the short telephoto and am impressed. In the meanwhile I also deliberatel gook a bunch of landscapes with my 35mm prime, and to tell you the truth, I think I can live with it.

My strategy is to make do with what I have (its generally pretty good stuff) build skill, and when I eventually do buy more lens, to only get the best.   In thee interim, for the sake of quality & color fidelity, may go with a 24mm Canon prime.  What I really want is L, low f stop, and IS in a low range zoom.  If it does not have IS, then I'm not going to spend the money on it.

If your work is publicly posted on PBase or the like, please, let us have the link. Your answers are thoughtful and I bet your photos are too.
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MikeMike
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2007, 07:07:03 PM »
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What I really want is L, low f stop, and IS in a low range zoom.  If it does not have IS, then I'm not going to spend the money on it.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=114913\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

That basicly leaves the Canon 24-104L. Its what I have and i can't recommend it enough. Hope this helps  

Mike
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Goodlistener
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« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2007, 07:48:17 PM »
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That basicly leaves the Canon 24-104L. Its what I have and i can't recommend it enough. Hope this helps   

Mike
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=115092\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
It does help, the 24 end is what I want, but its a heck of a product for nearly $1,1100 price.  Will avoid compromises that divert attention from the goal and just hold off till the day is right.

Thanks
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2007, 08:29:05 PM »
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My 24-105 IS L has become my 95%-of-the-time lens. I could sell the other half dozen (and my Gitzo tripod) and probably never miss them. The 24-105 is my first IS lens, and that makes a huge difference. Save your pennies until you can get one. Maybe sell your significant other or something ...
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2007, 08:34:05 PM »
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I'll second that! I sold my 24-70 2.8 for the 24-105 4.0 IS and I use it 95% of the time
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
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« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2007, 10:12:48 PM »
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I use the Canon 24L and really enjoy the results I get with it.

http://chinasa.ga/teach-english-in-china/esl/2239-qinhuangdao-kindergarten-needs-esl-teachers
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china english news My HDR Photography from Okinawa Japan.  | teach english in china Other from Okinawa Japan. So what do you do? You don't want create a
RMichael
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« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2007, 06:16:58 AM »
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Hi.......I use a K10d. Would anyone have a recommendation for a Pentax or a third party lense for landscapes? I prefer single shots at the moment for the sheer lack of knowledge of the stitch process.
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Goodlistener
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« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2007, 09:54:57 PM »
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That basicly leaves the Canon 24-104L. Its what I have and i can't recommend it enough. Hope this helps   

Mike
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=115092\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

For what its worth, I checked out the Canon 24-105 IS L lens today in a store. Shooting in their bad light ( a Best Buy store) at ISO400 the full auto settings gave me 1/30 second exposure at full zoom.  With IS turned on, text on signs 15 yeards away were VERY sharp even at 1/30 seconnd. With IS off, 1/30 of a second showed very blury text.

What does this prove?  to me, that IS works and that even if you have to live with F/44 as the most open aperature, you can get clear pics hand held at 1/30.  I'm thinking that a good tripod is my IS system for landscapes, and the direction may be 10-22 or 17-35 amongst zooms or 24mm amongst primes, but I'm also thinking that its time for action and I better just do it.
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jess lee
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« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2007, 08:40:51 AM »
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I would suggest you look into the Canon Tilt Shift lens. They all have excellent quality, work with converters for versatility, and can give you the ability to do near/far compositions a la large format.

While the 24-105 is a great walk around lens there are better tools for landscapes.
Jess



Quote
May I have experienced advice abut which might be a good lens for large vista type landscape photography?  My body is a Canon XTi which is the small sensor APS-C size.  I prefer Canon brand lens and already have a 35mm prime, which is a good start at least.
My work is on www.pbase.com/goodlistener if anybody want to "take a peek".
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=114706\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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RomanJohnston
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« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2007, 10:44:26 AM »
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This is a VERY subjective thing. I personally carry from 12-400MM in my bag in 3 lenses.

Tokina 12-24
Nikon 17-55
Small Gap Between 55-80MM
80-400 VR

Seems to cover most situations as a landscape photographer...keep my kit relitivly light and mobile.

Usually I stick closer to the 12-24 and 17-55....perspective is a cool thing so the wider lenses seem to work better for my style of shooting.

Roman
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Goodlistener
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« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2007, 11:03:00 PM »
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Well, I started this  discussion, and got a lot of good advice.  I put together a spreadsheet with makes, models, specifications, sizes weights, dimensions, prices and sumarizations of reviews. Still did not come to a 100% firm conclusion but was, repeat, was, leaning towards the Cannon 16-55 Image stabilization lens for around $1,100 (which was too expensive hence the indecision).  The reason to lean in that direction was general purpose all around use and for the image stabilization.

I BOUHT THE CANON 10-22 LENS.  Why you might ask?
Because it is specialized for landscape, which is what I want to do more of.
Because it has low chromatic distortion and is very sharp within a fairly broad "sweet spot".
And finally, what put me "over the edge"?

Because I found a clean used one for $350 less than what a new one would cost and snapped up the bargain.  Specifications, features, did not tip the decision. A good bargain on a plausible choice made the final decision for me.

Anyway, thats my story and I'm stickin to it <grin>  The next challenge is to get familiar with the lens. It is VERY wide.

Nice sample shots with this lens from PBase are here (not my work)

http://www.pbase.com/generepair/image/74954608
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RomanJohnston
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« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2007, 07:06:26 AM »
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Awesome choice.... I went with a 12-24 and it has ended up being one of my favorite lenses. Once you master perspective and how to anchor your shots from foreground to back....it will REALLY start singing for you.

Look forward to seeing your work with it.

Roman
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panoak
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« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2007, 12:20:10 AM »
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I got bitten by the stitching bug last Jan. and have since built 5 versions of my own multi-row, rectilinear pano head.  I've sorta' kept track as I went along, and posted things here:Stitched Panoramas  Just this week, I had a talk with the boss over at the Digital and Panoramic Association, and wrote this nodal point tutorial for him:Nodal points  I have yet to write-up the last 2 versions of the hardware, but I've certainly become convinced that this is the way to go.  Have a look at the landscapes I have posted on the site.  Once you see what 100 to 300 megapixels of resolution can do for your prints, you too will know for a certainty that nothing can compare.  I use a 400D and 20D, and my main lenses are the 90mm Tamron F.2.8 macro, and the Canon 70~200 F/4L (non-IS).  These are 2 of the finest lenses ever produced on this planet.  I'm set now for the next decade or so.  Now, I just need a top quality 60 inch printer for under a grand...
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