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Author Topic: New Epson R3800 very pleased  (Read 15289 times)
dgillilan
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« on: April 30, 2007, 03:20:11 PM »
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Hello,
I have purchased a new Epson R3800 K3 ink printer, and I am very pleased with it.  I have only had my printer for 3 days and do not qualify as a long term user of course, but I have not seen the DOA problems or banding, etc.

 I have printed on two types of paper, the Epson Premium Luster paper, with the Epson icc appropriate profile, and the Red River Arctic Polar Satin with the Red River icc profile for this paper and printer.  I can honestly see absolutely no difference in quality of the two papers, I printed the same image, same size, no setting differences except for icc profile use, Adobe Photoshop CS3 managed the color. I am pleased with the colors in each print as compared to my monitor(hardware calibrated) and the quality of inks.  I was pleased with the packaging (do you think there is any tape left in the world now?)      

This was a very expensive printer purchase for me, but I am glad that I made the jump.  I also own a small Epson dye ink printer, the R320 with six inks.   I did not want to physically swap out the photo black and matte black inks and I wanted the larger cartridge sizes of 80ml, so for these reasons, I chose the R3800 K3 ink printer, over the R800 and R2400.  I am an amateur photographer who enjoys my equipment and shooting opportunities.

I look forward to trying the wider format papers and realizing the full use of this tremendous printer; I have some 17" wide paper ordered now of the Red River Arctic Polar type. I'll report back later possibly, with those results.

Thank you, I enjoy the forum very much,
Debra Gillilan
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ARCASWISS
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« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2007, 04:26:35 PM »
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I'm digging mine too.  Glad to be rid of the R2400 with its tiny little carts.  17x22 is a nice size.
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madmanchan
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« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2007, 04:53:52 PM »
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Hi Debra,

Glad to hear you're enjoying your new 3800. The Arctic Polar Satin is a nice paper. I prefer it to Premium Luster because of its slightly smoother surface. (It also doesn't have logos / watermarks on the back!) Red River's UltraPro Satin is also excellent and is even cheaper.

Eric
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2007, 04:59:44 PM »
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I'm digging mine too.  Glad to be rid of the R2400 with its tiny little carts.  17x22 is a nice size.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=115063\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


I see that inkjetart is supplying 17X25 in some surfaces.  This aspect ratio more closely matches the  common DSLR format.
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madmanchan
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« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2007, 06:53:18 PM »
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You can see here for some more options on 17x25:

http://people.csail.mit.edu/ericchan/dp/Ep....html#where1725
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dgillilan
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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2007, 06:54:12 PM »
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I see that inkjetart is supplying 17X25 in some surfaces.  This aspect ratio more closely matches the  common DSLR format.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=115071\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Peter-I did not stop to think and realize that the 17x25 paper more closely matches the DSLR format, and thank you for pointing this out! I will keep it in mind for my next wide paper purchase, as I do use DSLR and 35mm film SLRs(and have not committed to start cutting roll paper - yet). I have purchased paper from Inkjetart and will most likely do so again.

Thank you Doug, Eric, and Peter for your replies, I am happy to join the forum, and look forward to learning more about printing in general, and have already learned a lot from other posters on this forum about this specific Epson 3800 printer.  I hope to help others when I have the knowledge to do so. I especially thank Eric for his web pages on the correct usuage of this printer, and the correct settings for various papers, etc.,  and his helpful replies to many others on this forum.
Thank you again, this is a fun forum, Debra
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duranash
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2007, 07:23:44 PM »
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I previously posted over in the 3800 POLL thread - relating my problems with my 1st 3800 printer.

KUDOS to Epson - I called Customer Service mid-day Monday of last week and it was decided that they would send me a new printer - but they were out of stock.  They could send me a refurbished unit, which I declined.  So they put me "on the list" to get a replacement new printer.  There was a big box on my doorstep last Thursday morning!  I was so surprised that I called to make sure they hadn't sent me the refurbished one.

This printer seems just fine (hope I don't regret those words).  Paper feeds like it should, and the print profiles seem more than adequate for me.

On the tape issue - you are right, there is a ton of tape......and I had to save it to repackage the bad printer.  A small observation; wouldn't it make sense to use a BRIGHT color of tape?  After I thought I had all the tape removed, I got my flashlight and found yet another piece down inside.  Dark blue tape on black plastic?  Oh well, no biggie.
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BarryS
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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2007, 09:30:23 PM »
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I currently have a show up and I used the 3800 to print everything--what a pleasure.  The print quality is beautiful and sales have been good.  I highly recommend the Inkjet Art 17 X 25" MC Luster paper.  It's identical to the Epson Premium Luster and a whole lot less expensive.  You also owe it to yourself to get a nice natural 100% cotton rag paper.  I like Moab Entrada, but Red River has Aurora Natural--which will be out in 17 X 25" soon.
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Tango_01
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« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2007, 11:50:11 PM »
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Hi all, I'm another very happy owner of a 3800 for 2 months now. It seems pretty frugal compared to my ex R1800 -- at least the 3800 uses more of the ink to print than to clean itself after the never ending cartridges changing.

I couldn't be happier with the print quality and doing my first 17" wide print was almost a spiritual experience  I also find 17" to be a very good size since once you add a 4" or 5" mat all around it makes a pretty big picture.

I'm an amateur but thanks to this printer -- and being able to do all the testings myself -- I got a job with a big engineering company doing photos of their jobsites and buildings. I started with 3 Photos , than got an order of 5 more and now 9 ; all 17 x 22 + plus mat and frame wich I also do myself.

I purchased a 44" x 100' roll of Epson Premium Luster and cut it in chunks with my meter saw. That makes for pretty good price of paper. I also have an array of smaller quantities of other types.

I found good prices for ink with a vendor at Amazon. It's called Antonline, they ship really fast and buying 3 or 4 carts at atime you save on shipping. I averaged $46 per cart including shipping.

Enjoy!

Bests,

Pablo
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duranash
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« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2007, 11:12:36 AM »
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I purchased a 44" x 100' roll of Epson Premium Luster and cut it in chunks with my meter saw.

?Tell me again how you are cutting the paper?  How much difficulty have you had with paper curl....and feeding into the printer?
Thanks
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picnic
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« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2007, 01:28:03 PM »
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I purchased a 44" x 100' roll of Epson Premium Luster and cut it in chunks with my meter saw.

?Tell me again how you are cutting the paper?  How much difficulty have you had with paper curl....and feeding into the printer?
Thanks
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=115360\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Well, I didn't cut mine with a meter saw LOL, but bought a medium priced paper cutter and have had excellent luck.  Also made myself a really easy to use paper decurler.  I have printed quite a lot of IJA MC luster at 17 x 25 (16 x 24 prints) without any problem whatsoever.  

I've since ordered Hawks Mt. Condor in 17 x 25 but it hasn't come yet.  I've sampled a great number of papers and found that I liked the Condor in both BW and natural as well as I did others---and it does come in 17 x 25 which I can also cut to size when needed (rather than a roll--easier for me to store, no decurling at all and easy to cut to smaller size).  Also ordered Innova Fibra Semi matte in A3 for a boxed portfolio.  

I must say I still really like the 3800.  Mine was inactive for a number of weeks--not usually the case.  Still---no clogs, no other problems.

Diane
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HuskyRob
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« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2007, 02:41:17 PM »
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Also made myself a really easy to use paper decurler.

I too am a happy owner of a 3800!

Would you please elaborate a bit on what you did to make yourself a paper decurler?  I've been tempted to buy rolled paper, but have hesitated to because of the curling issue.

Thanks.
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vandevanterSH
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« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2007, 03:48:16 PM »
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I have started looking at the R3800.  Several questions: Is it a suitable printer for a person with no high end printer experience?  Can I get reasonable prints, plug and play or is there a long learning curve in-order to get reasonable results?  Is the 4800 professional worth the price difference?

Steve
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dgillilan
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« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2007, 06:43:37 PM »
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Steve,
I had absolutely zero high end printer experience when I bought my R3800. I had used an older(11 yrs) HP inkjet that does not compare with photo prints now, and also a newish Epson R320 on which I can print 8x10 and have not printed larger than that.  I was able to install the 3800 printer alone and had printed one 8x10 the day that I received shipment.  It was easy to set up and install the printer, sort of plug and play but does need driver installation which is simple, and I had no trouble and only had one question about sheet source that I figured out how to specify and I was up and printing within hours. I was pleased.
I am pleased with the printer menus within the printer to obtain ink level information for each ink, job information for the last 10 print jobs, other settings, and the level of control via the printer driver is amazing.  I am pleased. I am also pleased with the level of warranty provided by Epson and customer service-you do receive a premium level of service with a different toll free number to call and a guaranteed full unit replacement in the first year if serious problems occur.
I believe that the 4800 model will do roll printing whereas the 3800 will not. Also the 4800 has a high capacity paper tray and will accept 110 ml or 220 ml ink cartridges, whereas the 3800 has 80 ml cartridges.  Of course, the 4800 is about $800 more also, and those ink carts should cost more also.
If you don't need roll ability, I recommend the 3800. But if you print a whole lot and need the roll ability and the larger ink carts, go for 4800.
Kind regards, Debra
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madmanchan
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« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2007, 07:04:10 PM »
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Hi Steve,

The 3800 is a very friendly printer, even for the novice.

I have tried to help new users by writing a notes page and a FAQ page:

http://people.csail.mit.edu/ericchan/dp/Epson3800/index.html
http://people.csail.mit.edu/ericchan/dp/Epson3800/faq.html
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vandevanterSH
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« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2007, 08:51:52 PM »
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Thanks for the advice.  My reading has not caught with my questions.  Can or how does the 3800 or 4800 deal with 16 bit files using the supplied RIP?

Steve
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picnic
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« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2007, 09:47:25 PM »
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Well, I didn't cut mine with a meter saw LOL, but bought a medium priced paper cutter and have had excellent luck.  Also made myself a really easy to use paper decurler.  I have printed quite a lot of IJA MC luster at 17 x 25 (16 x 24 prints) without any problem whatsoever. 

I've since ordered Hawks Mt. Condor in 17 x 25 but it hasn't come yet.  I've sampled a great number of papers and found that I liked the Condor in both BW and natural as well as I did others---and it does come in 17 x 25 which I can also cut to size when needed (rather than a roll--easier for me to store, no decurling at all and easy to cut to smaller size).  Also ordered Innova Fibra Semi matte in A3 for a boxed portfolio. 

I must say I still really like the 3800.  Mine was inactive for a number of weeks--not usually the case.  Still---no clogs, no other problems.

Diane
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=115377\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I can't take credit entirely.  My husband came up with the idea of some of it.  We took a paper roll, rolled smooth paper around it (both the roll and the paper are wider than my 17" roll paper) far enough and made the paper long enough so that the paper I'm decurling never rolls over a "seam" where you tape the paper to the roll.  IOW--the decurling paper is at least 30" or so FROM the roll--that way the paper is laid on the attached paper to the roll and then I start to roll from the roll out.  The print paper is entirely enclosed by clean smooth paper and doesn't roll over a seam to make a mark.  I hope this is clear--doesn't sound totally so to me LOL.

Diane
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Tango_01
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« Reply #17 on: May 03, 2007, 02:41:01 AM »
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I purchased a 44" x 100' roll of Epson Premium Luster and cut it in chunks with my meter saw.

?Tell me again how you are cutting the paper?  How much difficulty have you had with paper curl....and feeding into the printer?
Thanks
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Here are some photos of the roll cutting experience. I didn't have much problems with the curling; I use cotton gloves and hold the paper in place until the printer grabs it.

[a href=\"http://web.mac.com/tribe3/iWeb/Site/Blog/89B2E6CE-18A9-42C8-8096-0AB3F63D4AC1.html]http://web.mac.com/tribe3/iWeb/Site/Blog/8...B3F63D4AC1.html[/url]


Regards.
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madmanchan
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« Reply #18 on: May 03, 2007, 06:24:36 AM »
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Thanks for the advice.  My reading has not caught with my questions.  Can or how does the 3800 or 4800 deal with 16 bit files using the supplied RIP?

Steve
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=115437\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

The Epson printer driver accepts only 8-bit inputs as input. You can print from Photoshop using a 16-bit image, but it will ultimately be converted to 8-bit before printing. This is true of either printer.

I recommend printing from the full 16-bit image, even if the driver accepts only 8-bit inputs, because then Photoshop can perform the conversion from your working space RGB to the printer's space using 16-bit math. This is useful in particular if the printer profile is 16-bit.
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vandevanterSH
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« Reply #19 on: May 03, 2007, 01:21:43 PM »
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Any one with a 3800 printing directly from Adobe Lightroom?  If so how are results/ease of use vs CS2/3?

Steve
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