Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Wimberley Head Version 2 and no-tripod-collar lens  (Read 3401 times)
pjo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« on: May 07, 2007, 06:11:24 PM »
ReplyReply

I am considering to purchase Wimberley Head Version 2.

I am seeking for the experienced user's opinion.

Wimberley Head Version 2 will do a great job for big guns.

But when I am shooting, I need to change the lens to smaller ones, such as 12 mm or 135 mm so which does not have tripod collar.

I am aware that Wimberley Universal Camera Body Plate P-5 is available.

But I am wonderimg P-5 could be the solution for smaller lenses.

The quick release plate runs parallel to the lens axis, and a camera runs perpendicular to that, so it looks like it is impossible to use the head with a short wide-angle.

Is this correct ?

If this is correct, do I have to replace Wimberley Head Version 2 with a normal head or just hold the camera with hands ?
Logged
Nill Toulme
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 741



WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2007, 09:08:38 PM »
ReplyReply

I feel like I've seen something that purports to do what you want, i.e., cobble a camera and non-collared lens onto a bottom-mount gimbal head like the Wimberley.  RRS offers a variety of multi-purpose plates and related gizmos; you might find something there.  I actually thought Wimberley offered something specific to this purpose but I couldn't find it on their site; maybe I dreamt it.

This to me however represents the singular drawback of full gimbal heads.  They're really limited to use with collared lenses.  It's the beauty of the Sidekick that you drop it into your ballhead when you need a gimbal head, and yank it back out and stow it in your pack when you want your regular ballhead.

What size lens are you dealing with here?

Nill
~~
www.toulme.net
Logged
pjo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2007, 09:44:35 PM »
ReplyReply

Thank you for your reply, Nill.

I will browse RRS site.

I am considering to purchase Canon EF 400mm DO and Canon EF 600mm.

Smaller lenses I use are
SIGMA 150-500
Canon 100-400
Canon 70-200 F2.8

Spotting Scope  KOWA TSN-774 with camera attachment.
This gives 680 - 1100 mm  F8.8 -F13.0

Also I use Canon IXY 1000, the litlle one to shoot birds.
This system gives maximum 7500mm F19.6, down to 1988mm F5.5, 843mm F3.2, etc.

---------------------
I looked at RRS site but it looks like they do not have a solution to the problem.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2007, 10:04:49 PM by pjo » Logged
Nill Toulme
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 741



WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2007, 10:36:40 PM »
ReplyReply

The Sidekick will work perfectly well with all of those save the 600, assuming an adequately robust ballhead to hold it.  Actually I even use my 400 f/2.8 on a Sidekick, with an RRS BH-55 ballhead, and it weighs slightly more than the 600, but most people will want a full Wimberley head for the 600.

So, unless and until you actually do get the 600, I would recommend a good strong ballhead like the BH-55 along with a Sidekick, on a stout set of legs like the new Gitzo 35xx series.  If and when you do add the 600, then go ahead and get the full Wimberley head to go with it.  Just consider it part of the cost of the lens.  

And then you might want to get another set of legs to go with the Wimberley head.  I quite frequently find a use for two tripods.

Nill
~~
www.toulme.net
Logged
pjo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2007, 11:39:49 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks again.

Reasonable advise.

So with Sidekick system, when I need to use non-tripod-collar lens, I just remove Sidekick and use the ball head only.  Correct ?

pjo
Logged
Nill Toulme
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 741



WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2007, 08:23:29 AM »
ReplyReply

Correct.  See details here and reviews here and here.

Nill
~~
www.toulme.net
Logged
pjo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2007, 08:43:35 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks again.

Now I have to choose the ball head.

Which one is best ?
Kirk BH-1, RRS BH-55, Markins M-20,  Arca-Swiss Z-1 ?

pjo

-------------------------------------

Will the Wimberley Head Version 2 be too much for 300 F2.8 or smaller ones ?

Will Gitzo GT3540L be good enough for the Wimberley Head Version 2 ?
« Last Edit: May 08, 2007, 09:02:18 AM by pjo » Logged
pjo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2007, 06:17:41 PM »
ReplyReply

Wimberley sent me a photo showing that the P-5  and M-5 camera mount can be used to mount a camera on Winberley Head.

Also a PDF describing it.


Mounting a Camera Body on the Wimberley Head

The Wimberley Head was originally designed to support professional cameras equipped with long, heavy 400mm, 500mm and 600mm telephoto lenses. However, with the cost of professional level camera equipment approaching the financial reach of the mass consumer, many more Wimberley customers are now demanding increased flexibility of use with the Wimberley Head. Mainly, they wish to be able to mount a camera body on the Wimberley Head when using a non-collared lens. There are a few different ways to achieve this. You will not be able to achieve the free-floating gimbal balance in this situation, but you will be able to put tension on the swing arm to position the camera at a variety of angles, and you will be able to track moving subjects with fluid panning motion. You will also be able to lock the panning base and swing arm for steady scenic shots.
1. You can attach a lens plate to the bottom of your camera (so that the plate is parallel with the lens barrel) this allows you to attach the camera directly to the quick release of the head. This works okay, but you have to adjust the legs of the tripod to level the horizon, and you are limited to horizontal format pictures.
2. Some people carry a small ball head with a quick release plate attached to the bottom of it and attach the ball head directly to the quick release on the Wimberley Head. This at least eliminates the need to remove the Wimberley Head, but it is a pain to have to carry an extra head with you.
3. Another option is a beanbag. You can set the beanbag on the head itself, or even on your big lens while it is still attached to the head.
4. Our regular suggestion is to pair a Camera body plate, either our P-5 Camera Body Plate or a Kirk Enterprises or Really Right Stuff camera L-Bracket, with our M-8 Perpendicular plate. (see figure below)
P-5 Plate (under camera) & M-8 Perpendicular Plate
This will also allow you to use the M-8 as a rudimentary macro focusing rail when used on a ball head.
Note: The Perpendicular Plate is not designed to give you the range of motion and precise adjustability of a rack-and-pinion focusing rail. The Perpendicular Plate gives you about 1.7 inches of total forward-backwards adjustment. This amount of adjustment is most useful when you are doing macro photography in the 1:1 scale range. Often you want to get as close to a subject as possible, but
after you’ve positioned you tripod, you find that you are too close and the subject is out of the focal range of your lens. Use the Perpendicular Plate to slide your camera back just enough to get your subject in focus.
Caution: When Using the perpendicular plate as a macro slider, you may end up sliding the plate so far back in the clamp that it is no longer properly clamped.
In order to insure that the Perpendicular Plate is clamped securely, it is important to make sure that the end of the plate extends at least ˝” beyond the middle of the clamp.

The Perpendicular Plate comes with one 3mm screw and a matching hex key. This screw can be inserted into the threaded hole in the bottom of the plate to serve as a stop that prevents the plate from accidentally sliding out of the quick release clamp in one direction. (The knob at the back of the Perpendicular Plate keeps it from siding out in the other direction.)

If you opt to use the stop screw, you must open the jaws of the quick release wide enough to load your lens from the top (instead of sliding it in). Top loading is a little less convenient, but if you use the stop screw you can be certain that your lens will not slide out of the clamp.
Using the stop screw will make it more difficult to quickly attach a flash bracket to the bottom of the plate. The stop screw will not interfere with attaching a flash bracket to the top surface of the plate.
The stop screw will also limit the amount that you can slide the plate backward in the jaws of your quick release clamp. If you are using the Perpendicular Plate as a macro slider (see Application 3), you may not want to install the stop screw. (Note: This is not a problem if your tripod head is equipped with a Wimberley quick release clamp: our clamps have special grooves that allow your plate full range of motion even when using the safety stop.)
M-8 Perpendicular Plate US$85
P-5 Camera Body Plate US$52
Logged
matt4626
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 187


« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2007, 04:17:57 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: pjo,May 8 2007, 01:43 PM
Thanks again.

Now I have to choose the ball head.

Which one is best ?
Kirk BH-1, RRS BH-55, Markins M-20,  Arca-Swiss Z-1 ?

As almost nothing to do with photography is made in the USA, I'd go for Kirk or RRS just to help our very, very, very small US photo hardware industry.
Logged
vgogolak
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 337


WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2007, 01:59:07 AM »
ReplyReply

I have had several of the large heads and the older ones had issues with freeze. I use the BH-55 with Sidekick for years, with no issues.

I have found that the big difference, and slight, is how they fit your 'hand' each ballhead has different philosophy on control knob placement. I had to relearn on some of my switches, but the RRS BH-55 feels quite comfortable (and I use on MF, SLR and mf 35mm)

regards
Victor
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad