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Author Topic: Yakushima cedar trees  (Read 11221 times)
BernardLanguillier
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« on: May 15, 2007, 02:54:54 AM »
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Dear all,

Going on with my spring Japanese islands special, I am just back from a couple of days spent in Yakushima, and island located South of Kyushuu and listed on the UNESCO World heritage area.

Pretty challenging hiking there, but great views. A few samples:







Cheers,
Bernard
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OnyimBob
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2007, 06:45:46 AM »
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Bernard,
Do you have any idea what you're doing to me? Envy is not a trait I've had much trouble controlling, but you are making it an almost impossible task! On two counts - first you consistently produce stunning shots, and secondly --- you're there and I'm not!
Great shots!
Bob.
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Antarctic Mat
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2007, 06:54:35 AM »
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Hi.
Three stunning shots, I love the soft feel of the first one, the second is amazing, the only  thing that bugs me a little is the tiny group of leaves on the left that just poke into the frame under half way down, tiny point but once I noticed them they stood out. The light showing on the right hand side reflected on the trees is just amazing. Incredible place!
Mat.
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erusan
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2007, 07:40:25 AM »
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Having just gone to the convenience store to get me a beer and some crisps, your first image almost made me cry... Next weekend I'm on my motorbike to explore the countryside!

Beautiful images, the first is Monoke Hime all over again. Man what a scene.

You must have made a fantastic trip, very inspiring to the more "homey" types among us    Thank you for the repeated "get off your butt" messages.
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erusan
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2007, 09:47:16 AM »
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Stunning as always, Bernard. I get a little tired of praising your photos, but I never get tired of looking at them.

Any chance you might publish a book of your photos? I would buy a copy in a minute!

Thanks again for sharing.

Eric
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2007, 12:50:21 PM »
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Incredible work, as always.  I agree with a previous comment about the few leaves on the left border of the second shot; I'd be tempted to gray them out a little.  The third one reminds me of 'Cathedral Grove' a place in the middle of Vancouver Island with 300-800 year old douglas fir trees...

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2007, 05:26:27 PM »
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Quote
Stunning as always, Bernard. I get a little tired of praising your photos, but I never get tired of looking at them.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=117694\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Erci,

Thanks for taking the time to comment this time again, I am actually surprised that you still bother.

Quote
Any chance you might publish a book of your photos? I would buy a copy in a minute!

Eric
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=117694\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

No book in plan right now, but I'll let you know if something shows up!

Regards,
Bernard
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2007, 05:27:09 PM »
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Bernard,
Do you have any idea what you're doing to me? Envy is not a trait I've had much trouble controlling, but you are making it an almost impossible task! On two counts - first you consistently produce stunning shots, and secondly --- you're there and I'm not!
Great shots!
Bob.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=117652\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks Bob, any way you could go out there yourself?

Cheers,
Bernard
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2007, 05:28:56 PM »
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Hi.
Three stunning shots, I love the soft feel of the first one, the second is amazing, the only  thing that bugs me a little is the tiny group of leaves on the left that just poke into the frame under half way down, tiny point but once I noticed them they stood out. The light showing on the right hand side reflected on the trees is just amazing. Incredible place!
Mat.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=117653\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks for the advice, I'll get rid of these leafs on the left.

Cheers,
Bernard
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2007, 05:33:10 PM »
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Having just gone to the convenience store to get me a beer and some crisps, your first image almost made me cry... Next weekend I'm on my motorbike to explore the countryside!
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=117663\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Glad to hear that you are heading for the country, I personnally need to do that on a regular basis to stay somehow sane in Tokyo.

Quote
Beautiful images, the first is Monoke Hime all over again. Man what a scene.

You must have made a fantastic trip, very inspiring to the more "homey" types among us    Thank you for the repeated "get off your butt" messages.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=117663\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yep, it was a nice trip, although the route I picked on the first day of the 3 days trek was a bit tough to walk alone. Pretty difficult navigation in very thick vegetation. You miss one of the pink ribbons and you are lost for good...

If you decide to stay in Yakushima some day, I highly recommend the place called Chinryu an. Very nice owner! It is also the recommendation of the Lonely Planet Hiking in Japan guide book actually.

Cheers,
Bernard
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2007, 05:38:38 PM »
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Incredible work, as always.  I agree with a previous comment about the few leaves on the left border of the second shot; I'd be tempted to gray them out a little.  The third one reminds me of 'Cathedral Grove' a place in the middle of Vancouver Island with 300-800 year old douglas fir trees...

Mike.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=117736\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks Mike. Visiting Canada once more is definitely high on my list of places to visit in the coming years... I have kept amazing memories of my Icefield Parkway trip a few years back and would definitely like to spend time in BC as well.

As far as Yakushima goes, some of the older cedar trees are really old, around 2000 to 3000 years according to scientists. Unfortunately, most of the real big/old ones were cut down during the 19th/20th century... Unfoetunately, the quality of the wood of those trees is amazing. Very hard, water resistant and light at the same time.

Those that remain are very impressive sights. I didn't spend too much time trying to photogrpah them as they are a bit of a postcard topic, but they remain nonetheless very impressive to watch!

Regards,
Bernard
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2007, 03:47:31 PM »
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As far as Yakushima goes, some of the older cedar trees are really old, around 2000 to 3000 years according to scientists. Unfortunately, most of the real big/old ones were cut down during the 19th/20th century... Unfoetunately, the quality of the wood of those trees is amazing. Very hard, water resistant and light at the same time.

This is off topic, but what you wrote reminded me of a bristlecone pine tree lovingly known as 'Prometheus'.  My memory is a little sketchy, but back in the 1960's there was a group of people around Wheeler Peak in Nevada who knew of a group of bristlecone pine trees in the area. They wanted it designated as a park.  The idea went up and down the government lines but nothing happened.  Then in 1964 a university student who was studying glaciology took some core samples from some of the bristlecones at Wheeler Peak.  Dendrochronology (study of tree rings) can provide information on climatological conditions going back a long way.  Since bristlecones grow at high elevations and under extremely unforgiving conditions, the wood is very hard, and the coring tool the student and team were using broke.  Without anyone knowing they contacted the US Forest Service and received permission to cut down one of the pine trees.  The one they chose was 'Prometheus'.  Later estimates by a dendrochronologist estimated the age of the tree at 4862 years old.  In short, they killed the oldest known living thing on earth with a chainsaw because they didn't have a backup coring tool.  The runner up, 'Methusalah' is over 4700 years old and grows in the White Mountains in California.  People who know which tree it is aren't saying, to prevent tourists from taking souvenirs.

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2007, 05:15:28 PM »
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This is off topic, but what you wrote reminded me of a bristlecone pine tree lovingly known as 'Prometheus'.  My memory is a little sketchy, but back in the 1960's there was a group of people around Wheeler Peak in Nevada who knew of a group of bristlecone pine trees in the area. They wanted it designated as a park.  The idea went up and down the government lines but nothing happened.  Then in 1964 a university student who was studying glaciology took some core samples from some of the bristlecones at Wheeler Peak.  Dendrochronology (study of tree rings) can provide information on climatological conditions going back a long way.  Since bristlecones grow at high elevations and under extremely unforgiving conditions, the wood is very hard, and the coring tool the student and team were using broke.  Without anyone knowing they contacted the US Forest Service and received permission to cut down one of the pine trees.  The one they chose was 'Prometheus'.  Later estimates by a dendrochronologist estimated the age of the tree at 4862 years old.  In short, they killed the oldest known living thing on earth with a chainsaw because they didn't have a backup coring tool.  The runner up, 'Methusalah' is over 4700 years old and grows in the White Mountains in California.  People who know which tree it is aren't saying, to prevent tourists from taking souvenirs.

Mike.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=118001\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I think I have read that story told in one of Galen Rowel's books, what a shame really.

Regards,
Bernard
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fabgo
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« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2007, 05:30:12 PM »
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Hi Bernard,

Beautiful shots, especially the first. Yakushima is one of my favorite places on earth, and you remind me that I have to go back there.

- Fabian
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