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Author Topic: Recommendation for tour company-Antelope Canyon  (Read 11363 times)
JeffKohn
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« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2007, 08:22:04 AM »
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It sounds to me that dust is a major problem. We all invest a LOT of money in our gear. And it sounds like the gear is going to be covered in dust. Suggestions? Are there coverings (ie: bags) that can be pucahsed to keep dust off a camera/lenses?
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Many companies sell rain covers for cameras, and I would think using one of them could also be useful in dusty/sandy conditions. I certainly plan to use mine.

This should get you started: [a href=\"http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=sort&A=search&Q=&sortDrop=Price%3A+Low+to+High&bl=&atl=&pn=1&st=categoryNavigation&mnp=0.0&mxp=0.0&sv=3313&shs=&ac=&fi=all&pn=1&ci=3313&cmpsrch=&cltp=&clsgr=]http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller...h=&cltp=&clsgr=[/url]
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Mosccol
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« Reply #21 on: June 20, 2007, 01:28:23 PM »
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Indeed there is a lot of dust, but it is not a problem if you follow these instructions:

- Choose your lens carefully: you won't be able to change it! I picked my 17-40L
- Have a fresh CF card in place: 1 Gig was too small in RAW for 2 hours, I should have used 2Gig. Don't expect to have time for lots of deletes on the fly. Again, don't expect to change it
- Have a neutral filter in place. Nothing that loses light (you need everything!) and nothing that rotates like a polariser: it would catch sand/dust
- Carry a big blower with you as you will spend 10 minutes at the end cleaning your equipment. I usually have a 'rocket' in my kit bag and it did a superb job

Note: my EOS 20D is not weather-proof but no dust got inside
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duranash
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« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2007, 05:04:41 PM »
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.....and in addition to trying to keep the equipment clean (sort of) - any suggestions for what lens to use so you don't have to change while in the Canyon?
I see one suggestion above that wasn't there when I was typing my post.  I also have a 17-40 lens - any other suggestions?
« Last Edit: June 21, 2007, 05:06:42 PM by duranash » Logged
tandlh
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« Reply #23 on: June 21, 2007, 08:09:05 PM »
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Hi,
   I'll add another question to this.  After following this string I've decided to head on up to Antelope Canyon next Friday.  I see most photographers talk about going to Lower Antelope Canyon as the best spot partly because of fewer people.  It seems that all the pics I've seen with light shafts in it are from upper Antelope.  So, for this time of year, will Lower Antelope Canyon have any areas with light shafts coming through or is that just in Upper Antelope?  Also, I've heard some say that Lower Antelope is good in the morning and afternoon.  Does it make sense to try to do Lower Antelope in the earlier morning, then cross the road and go to Upper for the noontime light?

Ted
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Lester
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« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2007, 12:47:33 AM »
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Ted,

I am at Page, Az now, I shot at the upper canyon, on Tuesday, because I wanted the muilt light shaft. I been there this year and last year and I have not been at the lower canyon yet. The light shaft is what makes the picture for me. The Indian guides will stop traffic so that you will get the picture. A wide angle lenses around 20-28mm is a good lens for full shot of light shaft. The best time is, get there around 11:00 am and get your 2 hours in (11-1).

Trying the Horeshoe again, tomorrow. I don't have the right lens.


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Hi,
   I'll add another question to this.  After following this string I've decided to head on up to Antelope Canyon next Friday.  I see most photographers talk about going to Lower Antelope Canyon as the best spot partly because of fewer people.  It seems that all the pics I've seen with light shafts in it are from upper Antelope.  So, for this time of year, will Lower Antelope Canyon have any areas with light shafts coming through or is that just in Upper Antelope?  Also, I've heard some say that Lower Antelope is good in the morning and afternoon.  Does it make sense to try to do Lower Antelope in the earlier morning, then cross the road and go to Upper for the noontime light?

Ted
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tandlh
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« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2007, 01:02:32 PM »
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Ted,

I am at Page, Az now, I shot at the upper canyon, on Tuesday, because I wanted the muilt light shaft. I been there this year and last year and I have not been at the lower canyon yet. The light shaft is what makes the picture for me. [a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=124628\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Lester,
   Thanks.  I agree with the light shaft.  I think that's what takes the image from beautiful to an 'oh my gosh'.  Did you book with one of the tours beforehand or just show up that morning?  If you get into the Lower Antelope let me know how that is as well.

Thank you,

Ted
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pathfinder
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« Reply #26 on: August 30, 2007, 08:12:45 PM »
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I was in Antelope last,  in June of 2006.  The wind  was blowing 30-40 mph hour in the open desert.  Sand clouds were everywhere.

Inside the canyon, sand was pouring down from 100 feet above and covered everything.  My camera was red in every crevice.  Despite this, I captured some absolutely lovely images that day with a 24-105 IS L on my 1DsMkll.  The light was gorgeous, soft and lovely.

I carefully cleaned the camera and lens afterward with a camel's hair brush and a micro fiber cloth. DO NOT use a blower - you will drive the fine pumice like sand inside the mechanisms. Use a fine brush and a micro fiber cloth.  Both can be found cheaply at Wal-Mart or Lowe's or whatever floats your boat. Both the lens and the camera function flawlessly today.  

Don't let the sand scare you away.  If you have a plastic bag you can fashion a jacket for your camera out of the plastic bag.  

Just do not attempt to change lenses inside the canyon.  And don't use a blower.

Touring Antelope is more like a crowded, sandy bus station, than the pristine desert oasis one sees in the images.  I would do it again in heart beat.
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tandlh
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« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2007, 09:11:05 AM »
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This is just a follow up on this based on my two trips to Antelope Canyon this summer.   On both trips I took the 2 1/2 photographers tour with Antelope Slot Canyon Tours.   My first time at Antelope Canyon was July 3rd.  There were 4 or 5 of us in the group and the guide was very good.  He pretty much helped herd crowds and put dust in the air to get the shafts to illuminate and then let us set up and do our thing.  I thought it was fairly crowded, but there were moments between groups when I could get some good shots.  All in all, it was very good.  The second time was Aug 22d.  Same company, but different guide.  This time there were about 12-14 in the group, mostly families with children using pocket digital cameras.  The guide thought it was her duty to tell us exactly where to stand and where to take what snapshot.  It was very annoying.  This was hardly a photograpers tour.  It was an extended 'let's take the family into the canyon tour'.  The crowds on this trip were about double what I saw in July.  There were very few moments where you weren't wall to wall people.  The worst part was despite her assurances to the contrary, the tour guide left the first chambers before the sun rays started and spent most of the time in the far part of the canyon where the sun rays never shine.  We didn't return back to the first chambers until the rays were already gone.  It was a complete waste of time.  I will never use Chief Tsosie's Antelope Canyon Slot Canyon Tours again.  Their photographers tour is not for photographers, it's for whoever just wants to spend a longer time in the canyon.  I understand they can't control who signs up for what, but they should be able to control their guides and where they spend their time and how they treat photographers.  Don't get me wrong, she was very nice, but did not treat the group like a tour of pro or semi pro photographers.  She treated us (frankly like most of the group was) a family snapshot walk through.   A minor point, but an important one for photographers.  It had recently flash flooded through the canyon and removed about 4 feed ot sand from the base.  What remained was damp and did not provide the dust necessary to get the shafts illuminated.  Our guide basically said, too bad.  I saw another company's guide carry in 3 bags of dry sand from outside to use.  A simple thing, but indicative of someone who cares and knows how to take care of their photographers.  Finally, even though it was supposed to be 2 1/2 hours, we left their base in Page at 1035 and were back at Page by 1245.  Take out driving time and the stand outside and hear her explain what ISO is we had maybe 1 3/4 hours inside.  I said before that I liked the first guide, but I heard that he was let go from them and doesn't give their tours anymore.
    My lessons learned from my two trips are:  Don't go in the summer if you can avoid it.   The chance of getting great photos (to me that means without people is slim).  Perhaps late May or early June would be best.  Second, I'll ask a whole lot of questions about other companies photo tours to see if I can fine one that will treat their photographers more appropriately.  Also ask them which times are best.  For late Aug, the time the shaft seemed to hit the bottom seemed to be only between 1130 and 1200.
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wtlloyd
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« Reply #28 on: September 02, 2007, 11:45:44 AM »
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Well, as long as this thread has been brought up again, here's my two cents - in Upper Antelope, having an eyepiece extender, such as Canon's "Angle Finder C" is a massive help. There are similar after market devices for other cameras, and Nikon probably has such a thing for their cameras.
Upper Antelope is so constricted in places that it is difficult to walk without hitting your tripod/camera against the wall - it's single file passage only. The Angle finder allows you much more leeway in setting your camera up and still being able to see what you shoot.
Your neck will thank you!
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azicit
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« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2007, 01:05:39 PM »
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Shower cap from the local motel and a blower.  Pop the shower cap on anytime your not actually shooting.  I have some "lovely" shots where the cap was still on....DOH!



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It sounds to me that dust is a major problem. We all invest a LOT of money in our gear. And it sounds like the gear is going to be covered in dust. Suggestions? Are there coverings (ie: bags) that can be pucahsed to keep dust off a camera/lenses?
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