Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 3 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Mamiya 645 AFD II vs Hasselblad H2  (Read 30563 times)
LA30
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 205


« on: June 09, 2007, 07:21:58 PM »
ReplyReply

I am interested in purchasing a MFDB system, I will be getting the phaseone p30 + and I need a camera system to go with it.  Contax is out for me and I have owned the mamiya 645 years ago when I shot film and liked it OK.  But over the last 2 years I have rented the H1 or H2 with the digital backs.  Most rental houses seem to rent the Hasselblad.  The price for a camera kit and a few lenses is dramatically different.  Is the mamiya crap?  I would love to get some professional thoughts on this.  Mamiya boast a lens test 7 years old on their site.  The 80mm from mamiya is $600.00 and Hassi is $1800.00

Thanks,

Ken
Logged
SecondFocus
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 463


WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2007, 07:53:00 PM »
ReplyReply

The Mamiya is a very substantial camera system. Lenses are very sharp, the whole system is tried and true. Some would say it is a more robust and rugged system that the Hassy. It is a very high quality system.

The difference falls to other feature differences such as synch speeds etc. You have to decide what you need and go from there.
Logged

Ian L. Sitren
SecondFocus
mcfoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 938


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2007, 07:58:44 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi
I have shot both & own the Mamiya 645 AFD, AFDII ,ZD & about 5 lenses. Last year due to a back software screw up I ended shooting a job with both the H2 & AFDII with a 120mm lens. I looked at both files that were shot with the Aptus 22 & could barely tell the difference. In the end I felt the tonality was better with the mamiya 120 lens. I had owned a Hasselblad 500cm for 18 years before I switched to the mamiya 645 AF system. I have no regrets and love the quality of the mamiya glass.  I also like the fact that the mamiya lenses are very affordable so you can build a system with out breaking the bank. They also have 2 new lenses the 28mm & 75-150mm. Since Hasselblad has come out with the H3D system that has a 28mm lens, you can only use there back to use this lens. At least mamiya is an open system. If you are shooting flash fill out side then the H2 could be a better choice  as Mamiya has a 125x flash speed.
Denis
Logged

Denis Montalbetti
Montalbetti+Campbell
www.montalbetticampbell.com
Don Libby
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 724


Iron Creek Photography


WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2007, 09:00:20 PM »
ReplyReply

Ken - I just switched to medium format and after several weeks of research I decided on the Mamiya 645 AFD II format.  I too went with Phase One P30+.  I now have several lens in my Mamiya kit ranging from 35 up to the big 300 f/2.8.  

I still have my "old" Canon 1Ds II with all it's "L" lens. It's still a little early for me to say this but, but I feel the Mamiya lens is just as sharp as the Canon L lens.  I haven't had the kit long enough to do a real side by side test but I am going out next week and will have the information by the time I return.  I've done testing of the kit around the house getting used to it and the new lens and so far I'm blown away with the images.

I am very pleased with the Mamiya and Phase One back.  If you have the choice go with the Mamiya and I'm sure you'll be as pleased as I am.

To answer you biggest question as to " Is the mamiya crap? "  My answer to you is No!


Hope this helps

Don
Logged

LA30
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 205


« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2007, 09:08:28 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks Don and others.  I am sure that some is the Hassi name and the other part is the shutters/ flash sync.  I guess it boils down to what feels right.

Ken
Logged
Don Libby
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 724


Iron Creek Photography


WWW
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2007, 09:15:54 PM »
ReplyReply

Ken - You're right - it has to fit your hand and only you'll know it.  Can't go wrong either way just a difference in how much money you spend in the begining to get there.

Good luck

Don
Logged

Frank Doorhof
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1519


WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2007, 03:31:09 AM »
ReplyReply

I shot with the H2D22 and H3D39 on some workshops on the pro imaging, Hasselblad kindly loaned me two bodies for the workshops
The feel and look of the hassy was very nice but the camera itself felt a bit plasticy for the money.

When I wanted to switch I decided to look at the pricing for the lenses and the choice was VERY clear, I can simply not afford the Hasselblad system with the lenses I really want.
With the Mamiya I have now already build my lenses I want (still looking for a good tele ) and for a quarter of the pricing.

I opted for the 645AFD/II with the ZD back and it's a great system, the camera feels VERY solid and the lenses are razor sharp.

Hasselblad is indeed the name (which I also love) but the pricing is that high it never was a real alternative for me.

Greetings,
Frank
Logged
nicolaasdb
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 213


WWW
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2007, 04:15:21 AM »
ReplyReply

shot with both H2 and AFDII....and didn't like the H2....to digital...intricate..my world with all the digital hardware and software is hard enough....the Mamiya is nice and "simple"....the H2 gave me constant error reading and during a big (money) shoot a lens failed. Didn't like the fact that it comes with a rechargeable grip. Just my 2 cents...I know that there are a lot of shooters that love the H2 and they should.
Logged
ternst
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 425


« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2007, 06:26:29 AM »
ReplyReply

Since I bought my Mamiya/P45 system everyone has asked if it was a Hassy, assumed it was in fact. I used to shoot Hassy when they were made by Hassy but I  think they are made by Fuji now, is that correct? The Mamiya system seemed perfect for me, rugged and light with good lenses (I'm in the woods all day and don't need body or lens parts falling off - how many of those expensive Hassy zooms have flat out fallen apart like Michaels did?). But so many folks who don't really know any better seem to look down on Mamiya stuff, so to nip all of these questions in the bud I covered up the Mamiya name on the camera with black tape and when asked what camera system I use I simply reply "Phase One" and smile. I'm very happy with this system. By the way, I've done some 30-minute star trail photos with this system and the noise is a non issue. I can't wait to get the plus back in a few weeks so I can go a full hour...

Tim Ennst in Arkansas
http://www.Cloudland.net
« Last Edit: June 10, 2007, 06:28:33 AM by ternst » Logged
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7902



WWW
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2007, 08:29:13 AM »
ReplyReply

As a happy ZD user, I'll second all the positive things that have been said about Mamiya.

Just a minor negative comment on the price of lenses. It is true that they have been much cheaper than their Hassy equivalent until now, but it looks like Mamiya is now going for the fast lane also. Their new 28 and 75-150 mm are IMHO too expensive, they are in fact more expensive than their Hassy equivalent.

Regards,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
hcubell
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 729


WWW
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2007, 08:54:20 AM »
ReplyReply

Deleted
« Last Edit: June 10, 2007, 09:34:18 AM by hcubell » Logged

hcubell
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 729


WWW
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2007, 09:33:28 AM »
ReplyReply

I also abhor the the electronic complexity of Canon and Nikon DSLRs and would never use one for landscape shooting. I have used Pentax 67s and a Horseman 612. You can't get more "analogue" than these cameras. I have been working with an H3D-39 for the past six months and was initially put off by the menu of available choices. However, it is quite easy to set up the desired options and once you do, it is a VERY easy camera to operate and has two major advantages over other MF cameras. One is the viewfinder. It is simply a pleasure to methodically compose a photograph through that large, bright viewfinder that surpasses that of any of the other MF cameras in my experience. Pick up a Mamiya 645 and compose a photograph; then do the same with an H2. Is that important to you? The second is the four user programmable buttons that are ergonomically accessible to your right hand as you are shooting without lifting your eye from the viewfinder. As a landscape shooter,  I have these buttons set up to provide easy and instant access to four key functions:(1)mirror lock-up, (2)lens stop down, (3) a 3-9 shot sequence of bracketed exposures, and (4) autofocus(i.e., the camera is set to manual focus and you press the button to focus the lens using the autofocus). Once you have the camera set up the way you want, all you have to do is save that as a custom program and it is always there for you. Seamless. I have not looked at the manual since I bought the camera and programmed the buttons.
Logged

Frank Doorhof
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1519


WWW
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2007, 10:04:17 AM »
ReplyReply

I can't remember 100% anymore but I don't see much difference between the viewfinder of the 645AFD/II and the H2D/H3D to be honest.

But I shot 3 months ago with the hassy's so it's not fresh.
Logged
ternst
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 425


« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2007, 10:56:04 AM »
ReplyReply

My Mamiya viewfinder is miles ahead of Canon or Nikon and does everything I need - it is quite lovely to look and compose through. There is a mirror lockup button on the top of the Mamiya so no need for any menu at any time. And the way that I shoot I use the multiple-shot setting on the camera so the mirror goes back up in between each shot without me having to do a thing - great for bracketing and very fast! If I need to tweak the focus or check the composition I simply hit the button and the mirror returns. There are also some custom functions you can set up on the Mamiya (I think I read that - I've never needed any of them since this camera is so simple to operate) that sound kind of like the Hassy so that would not be an advantage for Hassy.

The price for that Mamiya 28mm that has been in the works for years does seem quite high, although I guess they figure they will sell them as fast as they make them so you can't blame them - supply and demand (if they ever actually get to market this time around).
Logged
mtomalty
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 536


WWW
« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2007, 01:28:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
By the way, I've done some 30-minute star trail photos with this system and the noise is a non issue. I can't wait to get the plus back in a few weeks so I can go a full hour...

Tim,

That image on your site,Kings River Falls,is one of the more compelling scenic images
I've come across in some time.  Nice work.
I don't believe it could be pulled off,noise free,with any other digital product,either 35mm or
MF,currently on the market today

Are you using any older manual focus lenses with your AFD or are you sticking with
newer designed AF lenses?

Mark
Logged
pss
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 960


WWW
« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2007, 01:40:02 PM »
ReplyReply

i own a P30 and use it with 645afdII and RZDII....the 645 does everything the hass sytem does except for the synch speed....the RZ gives me a few options the hass can't give me and the synch speed (ok "only" up to 1/400)...actually i shoot in LA and did a shoot at noon in full sun the other day....had no problem making the sky dark (1/125@ f16)...and for anyone looking for shallow depth of field PLUS outdoor sync, i guess the Hy6 (iso 25 with 1/1000) is the only option anyway.....
the 645afdII is a great, proven, simple camera, which can be adjusted in more ways then i would ever want.....the H can be adjusted just as much, but you might need a manual to turn it on (the first time i EVER had to look at a manual to go from P to M) but i am sure that is manageable....i just like cameras to have the buttons and dial where they all have them.....
yes the 645 is "plasticy" but so is the H, the buttons on the H are the cheapest i have seen on any camera, ever....
the lens range on the mamiya is nice, the prices are a dream....the H is a bit limited, and steep.....(the new mamiya lenses seem to follow that trend)....
the H grip is too small for my hands, and the lenses are very heavy....both systems need what contax and every DSLR have....a vertical grip.....
i have shot with the H a couple of times, i don't see a difference between the mamiya 645 and hte H lenses.....i do see a difference between the RZ lenses and the both 645....the RZ are a step up IMO.....
AF is more or less a joke on both, the finders are better then canon/nikon, but nothing compared to looking into the RZ.....
every time i shot with the H, there were problems....nothing that killed the shoot, but annoying.....i have yet to have ANY problem with either one of my 645afdIIs or the RZ or the lenses......

the only reason i could see to buy into the H system is to go hass all the way and get a H3D....take advantage of the software correction and hope that future developments will prove it to be the  winner.....
for anyone going phase, leaf, sinar,...i don't see the point of buying into a system that is (more or less) dead for your back....there won't be any new lenses for any of these backs and those lenses would be the ONLY reason to buy into the H system in the first place......
there is a rumor that C1v4 will have lens correction built in for the mamiya 28mm....whenever that comes out....who knows....it is pretty obvious that everybody else will come up with something as well in the long run....
Logged

ternst
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 425


« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2007, 03:45:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Mark:

I was pleased with how good the p45 did on that long shot. I went back a second night and did some hour-long exposures to get more trail in the stars and the first exposure seemed to do just fine, however when it was doing the dark slide hour exposure it stopped at 30 minutes. I repeated this just to make sure I had not done something wrong and the same thing happened. When I pulled up the images on the computer the hour-long exposures looked like they had been light-leaked across the entire frame (a term borrowed from the good old days of film - there was a bright orange layer across the entire image), and two opposite corners had light streaks on them. Very strange. Must have had something to do with the dark slide exposure as the 30-minute exposures that I did later were just fine. I know the plus backs can do an hour exposure so I am anxious to repeat this shot once I get my new back, however the new picture book I'm working on is going to press in about two weeks so I won't have the chance to include it. I do miss this long exposure ability of film (3-4 hours), but am really happy with how this back performs compared to my previous work with Canons and Nikons - I don't worry about doing long expsures in dim light any longer.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2007, 08:29:12 AM by ternst » Logged
ternst
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 425


« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2007, 04:41:36 PM »
ReplyReply

FYI, here is the hour-long exposure that I noted above - this is right out of the camera - obviously it did not like an exposure that long. I've also attached a copy of the 30-minute exposure that Mark noted above, although it has been worked a bit in post.
[attachment=2624:attachment][attachment=2625:attachment]
Logged
eronald
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3976



WWW
« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2007, 06:36:16 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Mark:
I don't worry about doing a minute exposure in dim light any longer (and exposure that would have looked terrible on either my Nikon or Canon cameras).
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=122098\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Canon 1dsII does two minutes ok; I've done this for interiors.

Edmund
Logged

Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7902



WWW
« Reply #19 on: June 10, 2007, 11:41:03 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Canon 1dsII does two minutes ok; I've done this for interiors.

Edmund
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=122123\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I have done severa 2 minutes shots with my D2x and have never had any problem either.

Regards,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Pages: [1] 2 3 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad