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Author Topic: getting started  (Read 6214 times)
jayhendry
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« on: June 23, 2007, 11:26:02 PM »
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I just fell into photography by accident.  Took some photos on vacation last year and thought they looked prety good.  When my Olympus was stolen I purchased a Cannon this year and while showing the results to some friends, they started buying them from me.   I am starting blind but it feels great,  just don't know where to go from here.  I have a Cannon S3 IS and thats all.  I have been very happy with the results but don't understand half of the capabilities of the camera.  I have always loved hiking and just shoot what I think is appealing.  Any suggestions on a good beginner siminar or class that might help me to better understand the basics and how to build on them to refine my results?
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2007, 03:47:58 PM »
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Hi There:

Welcome to the list!  There are hundreds of pages on the Luminous Landscape site that cover a broad range of topics.  Those are free and worth reading!  There are also the Luminous Landscape videos for sale - also worth watching and very informative.  Some of the contributors to this list have websites that have tutorials as well, and there are many links to other sites.   I would hate to guess at the number of photography books on the market... if you're just starting out you might want to wander into your local bookstore and see what's available.  Begin with some book(s) that interest you and go from there.  If you have iTunes on your computer, you can download podcasts that cover a broad range of topics.  Once you get started you'll find yourself with more specific questions and you can ask them here.  There is certainly no lack of information available; some of it is specific to different genres, and some of it more applicable to any field.

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
jayhendry
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« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2007, 07:12:25 PM »
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Thanks Mike,
I have found what you said to be true, there is an overwhelming amount of information available.  That creates a problem too, although it is better to have too much info than too little.  I just don't know where to start.  At the moment I am just experimenting with the capabilities of the equipment I have.  I shoot what catches my eye.  I thought that a hands-on tutorial would be great.
I am certainly happy that I stumbled onto this website, there is an abundance of knowledge right here.  
thanks for the response
jay
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Hi There:

Welcome to the list!  There are hundreds of pages on the Luminous Landscape site that cover a broad range of topics.  Those are free and worth reading!  There are also the Luminous Landscape videos for sale - also worth watching and very informative.  Some of the contributors to this list have websites that have tutorials as well, and there are many links to other sites.   I would hate to guess at the number of photography books on the market... if you're just starting out you might want to wander into your local bookstore and see what's available.  Begin with some book(s) that interest you and go from there.  If you have iTunes on your computer, you can download podcasts that cover a broad range of topics.  Once you get started you'll find yourself with more specific questions and you can ask them here.  There is certainly no lack of information available; some of it is specific to different genres, and some of it more applicable to any field.

Mike.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=124836\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2007, 04:09:22 AM »
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Jay:  At the risk of overstating the obvious, you do know that there is more to the Luminous Landscape than just the different forums, yes?  Start at http://www.luminous-landscape.com and click on Columns, Essays, Locations, Reviews, Techniques, Tutorials, etc.

As far as hands-on tutorials, it depends on what aspect of photography you're talking about.  Are we discussing camera hardware, basics like f/stops, shutter speeds, ISO, or genres of photography or composition or colour management or post-processing or lighting or...  it's a long list!

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
cappy1927
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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2007, 10:42:03 AM »
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I just fell into photography by accident.  Took some photos on vacation last year and thought they looked prety good.  When my Olympus was stolen I purchased a Cannon this year and while showing the results to some friends, they started buying them from me.   I am starting blind but it feels great,  just don't know where to go from here.  I have a Cannon S3 IS and thats all.  I have been very happy with the results but don't understand half of the capabilities of the camera.  I have always loved hiking and just shoot what I think is appealing.  Any suggestions on a good beginner siminar or class that might help me to better understand the basics and how to build on them to refine my results?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=124626\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Ther is much to learn from these posts but my suggestion is to read the manual and when you have finished it read it again and again. Learn ALL the" capabilities of the camera".  Good luck , photography is loads of fun.
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mwookie
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« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2007, 09:21:21 AM »
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Thanks Mike,
I have found what you said to be true, there is an overwhelming amount of information available.  That creates a problem too, although it is better to have too much info than too little.  I just don't know where to start.  At the moment I am just experimenting with the capabilities of the equipment I have.  I shoot what catches my eye.  I thought that a hands-on tutorial would be great.
I am certainly happy that I stumbled onto this website, there is an abundance of knowledge right here. 
thanks for the response
jay
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You have the right idea by shooting what catches your eye. Read a lot, but shoot even more. When I started (and I am by no means an expert), I read and read till my eyes hurt. I packed a ton os scholastic knowledge in there, but I would get frustrated when I couldn't get a background to blur like I "say in the forums". I knew the principles but could get my camera (a Sony F717 at the time) to do what I read. Keep and evaluating. If it looks terrible on the monitor, don't just chuck it in the recycle bin, analyze what went wrong. I have learned in the last 3 years that I haven't made every shoot perfect, but my ratio of good to bad has more than tripled. That is success as far as I am concerned.



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prh555
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« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2007, 04:45:38 PM »
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Hi There:

Welcome to the list!  There are hundreds of pages on the Luminous Landscape site that cover a broad range of topics.  Those are free and worth reading!  There are also the Luminous Landscape videos for sale - also worth watching and very informative.  Some of the contributors to this list have websites that have tutorials as well, and there are many links to other sites.   I would hate to guess at the number of photography books on the market... if you're just starting out you might want to wander into your local bookstore and see what's available.  Begin with some book(s) that interest you and go from there.  If you have iTunes on your computer, you can download podcasts that cover a broad range of topics.  Once you get started you'll find yourself with more specific questions and you can ask them here.  There is certainly no lack of information available; some of it is specific to different genres, and some of it more applicable to any field.

Mike.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=124836\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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prh555
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« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2007, 04:50:35 PM »
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hi,

 i buy 2 magazines, at barnes and noble, each month.  PHOTO PLUS just came out and is written for canon users.  DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER is also very informative regarding technique. both are from england, and each has a DVD with it.

phil
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2007, 01:29:54 AM »
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Another important idea to consider is to invest some time studying photo books.  By photo books I'm not talking about books about photo techniques - those are also important - but to study photographs made by photographers whose work you admire.  When you find an image that appeals to you, ask yourself what it is about this image that jumps out at you.  Is it the composition, colour, selective focus, lighting... ?  By studying how good photographs are made you pick up ideas for yourself as well.

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
Colorado David
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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2008, 03:21:49 PM »
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When I am asked questions regarding starting out in outdoor or nature photography, I always recommend all the books by John Shaw.  Although most of his books were written before he switched to digital, the information is transferable and his information about composition and field techniques are timeless.

Best regards,
David
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Bill in WV
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2008, 12:13:58 PM »
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. . . and while showing the results to some friends, they started buying them from me.   . . . [a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=124626\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Statements like this fascinate me. If you don't mind, could you enlighten me just a bit on just how this occured? What sizes were you showing? Of what, in general? And how did you come to a price? Did your friends just ask, "Can I buy that?" or what did the transaction sound like?

I've shown people my photos, only a few of them, from a recent trip to the eastern Sierra Nevada and got comments like, "Oh, WOW!" 'Oh my God, those are gorgeous!" "that's great, you should sell these" But never, "can I buy that?" I not doing something right. Or more probably, not doing anything right.

Bill in WV
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Bill Evans

Currently shooting with Canon digital equipment
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