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Author Topic: LLVJ16 - California  (Read 2646 times)
sgwrx
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« on: July 02, 2007, 09:01:24 PM »
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My intention is not to imply anything, cry foul etc... simply an observation, question, learning op.

in the california portion of llvj16 at about 20mins 30secs, there was depiction of the scene (two crossing hills in a V formation with two trees silhouetted).  it was shown from the eye of the video camera and then the print/result of michael's photograph was shown.

up until now, i've concentrated on getting a good working image developed from raw... decent contrast, detail where i want it to be in shadows, nothing blown out in highlights unless wanted, good color.  the more basic things.  i have not however, done anything nearly as dramatic as what appears was done in this part of the video journal.

the video camera view, did not have dark black shadow on the left-hand side hill, nor the saturated green and brightness of the ride-hand side hill like the end result of michael's photograph of the scene.

Questions:

perhaps it was the video camera just not being able to show what the camera saw, or perhaps what the eye saw?

what did the camera see?

Comments:

assuming the video camera view of the scene is fairly more accurate to what was really there, it seems that the end result was really not "real" but instead was a dramatic digital manipulation.  

now i'm not calling this good or bad, but it seems to open my eyes a little more to creative vision for a given scene.  actually, yes it does seem like a good thing since it gives the original observer more license over what was seen and desired output.

overall this might seem like something that can help me progress.
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michael
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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2007, 09:13:58 PM »
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In a high contrast scene different camera technologies will record the image differently.

Regardless, there is after all no right or wrong. There is what the system is capable of and what the photographer wishes to show and how they wish to show it within the constraints of what any given recording technology can attain.

Except for forensics, photography has never been about trying to capture some literal truth. Rather it is about vision and interpretation.

Michael
« Last Edit: July 02, 2007, 09:24:23 PM by michael » Logged
sgwrx
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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2007, 09:38:04 PM »
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thanks.  yes, without regard to different technologies, i think this particular scene struck a note with me because it seemed so "normal" (as viewed through the video camera).  it's definitely a lesson to be learned - what i used to look at once and dismiss, i'll now look at again to try and see beyond that.
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