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Author Topic: What kind of filter do I need?  (Read 7463 times)
Stuarte
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« on: July 04, 2007, 09:28:20 AM »
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Gearing up for a summer vacation trip to Yellowstone and southern Utah, I have my trusty EOS 5D + 24-105 and I've just taken delivery of the Canon 100-400 mm IS USM.  I'm itching to go out and play with it but I won't risk it until I get some protection on the front of the lens.

Question is, which protection?

I wan't something I can leave on the lens all the time which - ideally - will serve some optical purposes as well as a mechanical role.  I don't want to be constantly switching filters.  And anyway the front of the 100-400 is 77mm, which means that filters tend to be pricey.  

What sort of filter would meet my needs?
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francois
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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2007, 09:38:21 AM »
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Gearing up for a summer vacation trip to Yellowstone and southern Utah, I have my trusty EOS 5D + 24-105 and I've just taken delivery of the Canon 100-400 mm IS USM. I'm itching to go out and play with it but I won't risk it until I get some protection on the front of the lens.

Question is, which protection?

I wan't something I can leave on the lens all the time which - ideally - will serve some optical purposes as well as a mechanical role. I don't want to be constantly switching filters. And anyway the front of the 100-400 is 77mm, which means that filters tend to be pricey.

What sort of filter would meet my needs?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=126446\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Congrats for your new lens!
I tend to use my 100-400 without filter but always with the hood. I only put a UV filter when it's raining hard  or when shooting in difficult conditions (sea spray, sand etc.).

Edit: invest in a good filter, don't skimp on quality. B+W, Heliopan and other reputable brands offer 77mm UV filters.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2007, 10:17:23 AM by francois » Logged

Francois
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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2007, 04:34:47 PM »
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Congrats for your new lens!
I tend to use my 100-400 without filter but always with the hood. I only put a UV filter when it's raining hard  or when shooting in difficult conditions (sea spray, sand etc.).

Edit: invest in a good filter, don't skimp on quality. B+W, Heliopan and other reputable brands offer 77mm UV filters.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=126448\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Ditto Francois. I use B+W UV-Haze filters and leave them on all the time. Don't skimp- the sharpest lenses look flat through cheap filters.
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2007, 08:38:14 PM »
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I have had good luck with Hoya Pro1 digital MC protector filters. I read that UV filters reduce the resolution of a digital camera so I bought the Hoya protection filter and the UV filter. Made a quick test and they were right the UV filter was not quite as sharp (5D, 24-105 & 70-200 2.8 is). I have a pro1 d protector on all my lenses. Hope this helps
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/391169 REG/Hoya_XD77PROTEC_77mm_Clear_Pro_1.html
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
Richard Dawson
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« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2007, 10:06:22 PM »
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Gearing up for a summer vacation trip to Yellowstone and southern Utah, I have my trusty EOS 5D + 24-105 and I've just taken delivery of the Canon 100-400 mm IS USM.  I'm itching to go out and play with it but I won't risk it until I get some protection on the front of the lens.

Question is, which protection?

I wan't something I can leave on the lens all the time which - ideally - will serve some optical purposes as well as a mechanical role.  I don't want to be constantly switching filters.  And anyway the front of the 100-400 is 77mm, which means that filters tend to be pricey. 

What sort of filter would meet my needs?
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

There was a thread sometime back that covered this question.  You might want to check:

[a href=\"http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=11142&hl=]http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index....topic=11142&hl=[/url]

Hope this helps,

Richard
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qball
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2007, 06:18:35 AM »
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I wholeheartedly agree with the topic response.
The filter is only a filter and not a response to 'protect the expensive lens'
The camera gear is very precious and should be handled so --the best protection for any gear is good handling practice and maybe insurance

Image that THAT dynamite image is taken and on seeing it on paper there is a flaw in the content, IF you are not using a piece of glass in front of the lens-well you KNOW that that that ISNT the problem

I use a 25A all the time for the Infrared, and an 81B for cloudy chrome days...
Couldnt live without them.

Quentin
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YogiMo
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2007, 09:19:07 PM »
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Other quesiton related to this would be taking pictures in foggy situation. Some filters I read can make the picture a little bid clearer. Is this true, if yes which ones, or is it simply some cheap marketing tool to fool beginners like me?
I live in a foogy city, hence a little help from the equipment is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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James Godman
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« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2007, 12:51:26 PM »
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I would suggest that you don't use any filters at all, especially not to protect the lens (unless you must because of water or something), as this will degrade your image quality.  Also, embrace the fog!  I love shooting in fog because I get images with amazing depth, and sometimes it also unifies a scene.  Bring a tripod too.

Good luck.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2007, 12:53:32 PM by James Godman » Logged

John Sheehy
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« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2007, 04:33:31 PM »
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Gearing up for a summer vacation trip to Yellowstone and southern Utah, I have my trusty EOS 5D + 24-105 and I've just taken delivery of the Canon 100-400 mm IS USM.  I'm itching to go out and play with it but I won't risk it until I get some protection on the front of the lens.

Question is, which protection?

I wan't something I can leave on the lens all the time which - ideally - will serve some optical purposes as well as a mechanical role.  I don't want to be constantly switching filters.  And anyway the front of the 100-400 is 77mm, which means that filters tend to be pricey. 

What sort of filter would meet my needs?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=126446\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I've taken about 100,000 images with my 100-400, over a period of 3 years, and have never had any filter on it except a rare polarizing filter (for shooting fish in lakes, etc) and the occasional color filter for special purposes.  I don't have a single nick or scratch or abrasion on the lens, nor any of my other lenses.

Protection filters are not necessary, IMO, unless you're going to be in windstorms, or are photographing cars racing on gravel, and things of that nature.  The lens hood will provide all the protection you need from the lens falling or bumping into things, IMO.

Filters just put out something closer to where the sun can reach, to lessen contrast by the fingerprints and dust lighting up from the sun, and they lose some optical sharpness (though that varies with quality).  With very wide angle lenses, the dirt on filters can actually be almost in focus.
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YogiMo
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« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2007, 07:00:38 PM »
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I would suggest that you don't use any filters at all, especially not to protect the lens (unless you must because of water or something), as this will degrade your image quality.  Also, embrace the fog!  I love shooting in fog because I get images with amazing depth, and sometimes it also unifies a scene.  Bring a tripod too.

Good luck.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=126859\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Oh I also like the fog, took already some great pictures. However if you have fog 300 days of the year it gets to you, especially you miss the sun. (for fellow Chongqing residents - it is the big yellow round thing in the sky)
It seems that the concences is that a filter is not much use, expect for some areas like water etc.
thanks for the advice!
best regards
York
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