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Author Topic: croping advice  (Read 2669 times)
wmchauncey
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« on: July 08, 2007, 03:55:18 PM »
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For that great shot (not that all aren't great) and you want to crop using the golden ratio, what image size ratio are you thinking of?
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2007, 04:41:26 PM »
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For that great shot (not that all aren't great) and you want to crop using the golden ratio, what image size ratio are you thinking of?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=127159\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
The Golden Ratio (or "Golden Mean") is approximately 1.6180339887. Using 1.6:1 is probably close enough.

But I much prefer to crop based on the needs of the image, rather than on some magic number.

YMMV (but the golden ratio won't vary).
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wmchauncey
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2007, 05:19:18 PM »
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The Golden Ratio (or "Golden Mean") is approximately 1.6180339887. Using 1.6:1 is probably close enough.

But I much prefer to crop based on the needs of the image, rather than on some magic number.

YMMV (but the golden ratio won't vary).
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=127170\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
ok, but do you try to stick to standard sizes?
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2007, 07:59:27 PM »
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ok, but do you try to stick to standard sizes?
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OK, you got me there.    

I admit that I am somewhat inconsistent about cropping, and I do let practical considerations get in the way some of the time. For example:

1.   My initial (in-camera) cropping is often dictated at least partly by the shape of the viewfinder/sensor/film. When using a view camera (4x5" or 8x10"), I tend to look for scenes that fit well into the 4x5 format. My 35mm images are often wider, having about a 2x3 format (from the 24x36 mm negative format.) Much to my surprise, when I began using a 6x6 cm medium format camera, I found lots of images that seemed to want to be square.

2.  But, I often find images that do not fit nicely into the camera's native format. I will take the picture anyway, with the conscoious intention of cropping into a non-standard size later. The first print I make of any image is most often cropped in a way that seems to fit the image, regardless of how conventional the proportions are.

3.  Another problem comes up when I am preparing pictures for an exhibition. To my eyes it looks kind of bad to have just one or two images in unusual  proportions. And I have standard sized frames and overmats that I like to reuse from one show to the next (saves $$$), so I may try to select images that all seem to work in a common size. Lately I have been showing many prints cropped to 10x15" (in 16x20" frames) or 12x18" (in 18x23" frames). Some of my photos are sufficiently abstract that I can get away with stretching the images in one direction to make them fit one of my standard sizes. I won't do that with landscapes or images of people, as that can get really creepy really fast.

This is probably more detail than you really wanted, but I guess the bottom line is: like the "rule of thirds" for composition, I think you should feel free to use a standard size (or the golden ratio) if it really seems to fit your image; otherwise, use the cropping that fits the subject.

My 2 cents, YMMV.
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johnwolf
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2007, 10:09:03 AM »
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I like keeping all the data, so I compose and crop to the sensor dimensions -- in my case 2:3. And I print in standard 2:3 sizes, for which mat openings and frames are readily available. FrameDestination, for example, has good stock of these.

If the image really demands something else, I'll do that sometimes, too. For example, I like square a lot.

The other exception is verticals. 2:3 verticals just seem too tall to my eye. So I do them in 4:5.

John
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AndyF2
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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2007, 11:57:25 AM »
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For that great shot (not that all aren't great) and you want to crop using the golden ratio, what image size ratio are you thinking of?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=127159\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Some photos (a quarter to a third of the ones I take) really look better when cropped to what best makes the image.  I cut my own mats and order the glass to whatever dimension I need, so those are under my control.  That leaves the frame rails.  

After allowing for the mat border, which is usually equal all the way around, I may compromise a bit on the cropping so the aspect ratio allows me to use top & bottom rails from one kit, and side rails from another kit to make the overall frame size I need.

This also results in a collection of framed images that frequently have an edge size in common which might help with visual layout of the images on the wall.

I suppose it's not difficult to buy uncut frame rails and a jig, but standard sizes are usually good enough.

Andy
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wmchauncey
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2007, 04:34:57 PM »
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What it sounds like is that you guys let the image rule the crop rather than let some painter's rule control your crop.  That about it?   thanks for input!!
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The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
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