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Author Topic: Pirelli Calendars  (Read 7044 times)
Rob C
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« on: July 19, 2007, 02:47:14 PM »
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I own two editions of the Pirelli Calendar Book: the first one courtesy my wife as a birthday present (the book, not the wife), the second a present to myself with a few additional years on the clock for both calendar and buyer.

You might well ask why anyone might want a Pirelli book, but if you have to ask there is no way of explaining it to you in a way you might understand.

If you have understood, are still with me, here is a link:

http://www.pirellical.com/thecal/home.html

Now, the topic I raise is this: do the calendars of the last ten years or so match up to the earlier ones in both an aesthetic sense and a must-have-one too sense?

For anyone interested in the world of calendar photography, there have been few calendars that can be judged to have been so influential - seminal, even - in effect. To paraphrase David Niven who wrote the forward to the first Book: no whimsical terriers and thatched cottages... There always were pictures of īglamourīmodels on calendars - what a travesty of the meaning of the word glamour that has been - but somehow those early Pirelli years were that breath of fresh air that the business had been waiting for: glamour by fashion photographers! Eventually, even that turned out to carry the seed of its own failure (all my personal opinion, your honour) and something fairly important was lost in the process.

Looking over the books and now the website, I cannot escape the deep feeling that the photographers have been subordinated to the art director(s). Where once I believed I saw the eye of the photographer, I now feel I see the PLAN, the big pitch that was made to the client and the exchange of the free eye for the fettered, mechanical interpretation of the concept. And you know what - I donīt think it works as well any longer.

I invite you to look at the link and to compare the years. For some reason, the colours I get suck; the black/white works well enough. This is peculiar to this link - other sites pose no such colour problems on my monitor.

Have fun - Rob C
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2007, 10:10:19 PM »
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Seems pretty hit and miss.  I will say that everything up to (My cat will not stop stalking my chicken noodle soup.  This is getting irritating.) 74 is more, for lack of a better word, fun than everything 84 on.

In related news I find that now that Sports Illustrated has decided to screw trying to be politically correct their swimsuit issues are getting much better.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2007, 10:13:46 PM by DarkPenguin » Logged
Rob C
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2007, 04:43:44 AM »
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Quote
Seems pretty hit and miss.  I will say that everything up to (My cat will not stop stalking my chicken noodle soup.  This is getting irritating.) 74 is more, for lack of a better word, fun than everything 84 on.

In related news I find that now that Sports Illustrated has decided to screw trying to be politically correct their swimsuit issues are getting much better.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=129801\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Hi Mr P

I had imagined that despite all the īlandscapesī out there, this poor little seed had fallen upon barren ground; thanks for proving me wrong!

PC: I feel that as more people beging to realise that PC started as, and always will be, nothing more than over-educated-ugly-sister denialist crap, the sooner the world will get its act together and move into a more pleasant era. There are several things which mark the levels of this nonsense: in the UK there is this current rubbish about abbreviations, where the term Paki, for example, is considered an insult. Paki is no more than an abbreviated form of Pakistani and as I have no objection to being called a Brit, in its turn an abbreviation, no more no less, of Briton, where the imaginary problem? To say that when applied to second-generation people things become different is also nonsense: do not most Americans too think of themselves as Irish-American, Italian-American, African-American or some other form of sub-devision of the term American? Rather than some sort of shame, isnīt there more a kind of ancestor pride at play here?

Another example of British madness is where, in the current situation with terrorists, there is a great outcry from Asian Muslims who in specific situations object to being stopped as primary suspects - would anyone really expect the fuzz to be looking out for blue-eyed blondes in this context?

Ciao - Rob C
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