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Author Topic: Off camera flash and umbrella  (Read 4796 times)
acorreia
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« on: August 02, 2007, 03:40:17 AM »
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Would you please be so kind as to drop me a line about these pictures I shot yesterday with 430 EX and umbrella ?
It was the first time I was using the umbrella.    
I can say that the umbrella shouldn't be at my right but at my left to begin with.    
I have used aperture priority increasing the ISO when the light was not enought to handhold the camera.
I don't know why the photos seem a little orange/red. I know that there was some incandescent light in the room.
I must try again in a different way.
This has nothing to do with Brent's work ( http://www.stateofthenation.co.nz/ ) . His work is super and mine is just beginning.  
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António Correia
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Ray
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« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2007, 10:30:00 AM »
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I sometimes find, when converting a RAW image in ACR, that the 'as shot' auto white balance seems a bit off. Trying the other options for WB in ACR can occasionally and miraculously produce the right result.
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acorreia
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« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2007, 03:41:17 PM »
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I sometimes find, when converting a RAW image in ACR, that the 'as shot' auto white balance seems a bit off. Trying the other options for WB in ACR can occasionally and miraculously produce the right result.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=131202\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Thank you ray.
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António Correia
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Rob C
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« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2007, 04:44:28 AM »
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Would you please be so kind as to drop me a line about these pictures I shot yesterday with 430 EX and umbrella ?
It was the first time I was using the umbrella.   
I can say that the umbrella shouldn't be at my right but at my left to begin with.   
I have used aperture priority increasing the ISO when the light was not enought to handhold the camera.
I don't know why the photos seem a little orange/red. I know that there was some incandescent light in the room.
I must try again in a different way.
This has nothing to do with Brent's work ( http://www.stateofthenation.co.nz/ ) . His work is super and mine is just beginning.   

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=131139\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

To tell you the truth, the pictures look perfectly nice to me, other than the colour cast. Of the two, the inclusion of mixed light sources more visible within the frame gives an even  better sense of 3-D to the wider shot.

You shouldn´t expect use of an umbrella to be any kind of panacea in room settings. It certainly helps to make things look more natural, but light falls off from an umbrella following the same inverse square law as it does anywhere else. That´s one of the reasons that I love b/w so much more than colour: in b/w, using whatever kind of light you want to use, the effect of light fall-off is one of concentrating the mind and eye on the real subject and the darkening background or colour casts from walls etc. are unable to intrude. As you implied yourself, the brolly still has to light the main subject from the best direction. It might even be better to forget the brolly and bounce flash off the wall/ceiling join. If in glorious b/w it won´t create a cast problem.

Ciao - Rob C
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acorreia
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« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2007, 05:02:14 AM »
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Thank you Rob for your comment.
I think this kind of pictures - I mean children and familly photos - are better in color.
I think Maria Luisa's parents would not like to see the photos of their daughter in black and white.

However, I myself like to look at pictures in B&W, of different subjects.

My father, some 45 years ago, was shooting in B&W in 6*6 cms with the Rolleicord.
My uncle and himself spent hours into the night developping the photos in a small studio, under the stairs of the house.

I still got some of his pictures, which I should be recovering.
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António Correia
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mikeseb
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« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2007, 01:44:01 PM »
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Antonio, I like your pictures as they are with maybe a WB tweak. Would be interesting to see them in B&W.

I really like your dad's photograph. If you have his negatives, what a treasure. It would be fun to scan and print them. A nice legacy he's left you. (I hope he's still around to enjoy them with you.)
« Last Edit: August 06, 2007, 01:44:48 PM by mikeseb » Logged

michael sebastian
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Rob C
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« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2007, 02:40:15 PM »
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Move aside HC-B, Ronis, Doisneau et al: somebody else can do it just as well!

Ciao - Rob C
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acorreia
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« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2007, 03:15:16 AM »
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Antonio, I like your pictures as they are with maybe a WB tweak. Would be interesting to see them in B&W.

I really like your dad's photograph. If you have his negatives, what a treasure. It would be fun to scan and print them. A nice legacy he's left you. (I hope he's still around to enjoy them with you.)
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=131797\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I have many pictures - I don't know how many - of his pictures.
I do have the negatives and quite a few prints at 30 / 40 cms.
I even have my own negatives and some prints too.
Well, a lot of work to do: scan and classify.
Thank you for your comment.
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António Correia
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acorreia
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« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2007, 03:21:57 AM »
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Move aside HC-B, Ronis, Doisneau et al: somebody else can do it just as well!

Ciao - Rob C
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I don't know if I am following you:
You don't mean that my father's photo is at the same level of Henri Cartier Bresson, Doisneau or any of this masters, do you ?
I am sure you don't.

You know that many many times in life the chance of knowing the right people and having some money can put you in the right track of life.

I mean, doing what you really like and know, get known in the "millieux" depends too often on the pleople you know.
If your friend is a critic of art you get a good change of becoming well known.
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António Correia
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Rob C
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« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2007, 04:21:33 AM »
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I don't know if I am following you:
You don't mean that my father's photo is at the same level of Henri Cartier Bresson, Doisneau or any of this masters, do you ?
I am sure you don't.

You know that many many times in life the chance of knowing the right people and having some money can put you in the right track of life.

I mean, doing what you really like and know, get known in the "millieux" depends too often on the pleople you know.
If your friend is a critic of art you get a good change of becoming well known.

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=131910\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yes, that was exactly what I meant.

I have several books on the works of those photographers that I mentioned and one or two things become apparent: they were working to a political brief (the magazine or agency´s) which was left-wing; they all tended to do the same sort of photography because they all were hired to concentrate on the same subject which was the poorer ´downtrodden´ or ´ordinary´ citizens of France. Several of them were not even French but refugees from other European countries which were making it too hot for them to remain where they were. This must obviously have coloured their personal point of view on life - how could it not ? - and because so many young people tend to be naturally left-wing - a sort of romantic but impossible reality-defying ideal - the work of those photographers has managed to survive by virtue of that youth market, at least the part of it that´s literate enough to care one way ot the other, and to buy into recent history, not to mention the many photographers who look upon that era and those personalities as a kind of support for their own attitude, quite apart from the fact that some of the work is simply so interesting in a non-political way.

There is also a romantic touch in looking back at the styles and ways of recent history and these photo-books provide instant access to that past, which is why I think that it is not just photographers that buy them.

Okay, your father´s photograph is just one that I have seen; extrapolation is always suspect, but I see no reason to believe that he was unable to do other pictures in that style or, perhaps better to say, in that idiom. If they were as good, then because he might not have been published doesn´t demean his oeuvre at all. Because I have made my living as a professional does not mean that an amateur is unable to produce work every bit as good if not better than my own. The only difference might well be that as a pro I get one chance each time, and if I fail I don´t eat.

Doing that photo-journalist thing is a matter of eye as much as any other type of photography inevitably is too. If your father was able to see that one picture, then why would he not be able to see others in other places and circumstances?

Ciao - Rob C
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acorreia
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« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2007, 04:09:40 PM »
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Yes, that was exactly what I meant.
... Several of them were not even French but refugees from other European countries which were making it too hot for them to remain where they were. This must obviously have coloured their personal point of view on life - how could it not ? - and because so many young people tend to be naturally left-wing - a sort of romantic but impossible reality-defying ideal - the work of those photographers has managed to survive by virtue of that youth market, at least the part of it that´s literate enough to care one way ot the other, and to buy into recent history, not to mention the many photographers who look upon that era and those personalities as a kind of support for their own attitude, quite apart from the fact that some of the work is simply so interesting in a non-political way.

There is also a romantic touch in looking back at the styles and ways of recent history and these photo-books provide instant access to that past, which is why I think that it is not just photographers that buy them.

Okay, your father´s photograph is just one that I have seen; extrapolation is always suspect, but I see no reason to believe that he was unable to do other pictures in that style or, perhaps better to say, in that idiom. If they were as good, then because he might not have been published doesn´t demean his oeuvre at all. Because I have made my living as a professional does not mean that an amateur is unable to produce work every bit as good if not better than my own. The only difference might well be that as a pro I get one chance each time, and if I fail I don´t eat.

Doing that photo-journalist thing is a matter of eye as much as any other type of photography inevitably is too. If your father was able to see that one picture, then why would he not be able to see others in other places and circumstances?

Ciao - Rob C
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Rob. Good evening.
You made me think of the 25th April in Portugal, when everybody thought a bright future was about to begin. Everybody - I mean many - people was from the left and against the regime.
Look at this photo by Eduardo Gajeiro please - [a href=\"http://inet.sitepac.pt/SalazarGageiro.jpg]http://inet.sitepac.pt/SalazarGageiro.jpg[/url] - may be this photo was also made up as the kiss in Paris by HCB, but what really matters is that it was representing a moment in the History of Portugal.

That romantic touch you are talking about is also present in the mind of many portuguese who lieved those historical moments of this country.

On that day I was 40.000 kms away and I was sorry. I arrived to Lisbon on June that same year.

I post another of my father's photos. This one is not so political.
I can remember others of his photos which are not scanned with more political impact.
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António Correia
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Rob C
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« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2007, 05:09:03 PM »
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Hey, Antonio, it´s a pleasure! Glad you had time to look at those shots in b/white - for me, it has ALWAYS been so much more spiritual but the commercial life didn´t see it that way very often.

Ciao - Rob C
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