Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Advice for photography in Iceland  (Read 3697 times)
Lisa Nikodym
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1702



WWW
« on: May 30, 2004, 11:15:02 PM »
ReplyReply

[font color=\'#000000\']I was in Iceland for a week a few years ago (in early June).  The weather was extremely variable, sometimes sunny, sometimes stormy, so bring a range of ISOs for all weather conditions if you don't tend to use a tripod.  Also, it was *ludricrously* windy part of the time I was there, and, according to the locals, that isn't particularly unusual; though it may not be particularly relevant to photography (except that steady hand may be irrelevant if you can't even stand up straight because of the wind!), be prepared for serious wind from a personal standpoint.

Lisa[/font]
Logged

Guest
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2004, 07:53:03 AM »
ReplyReply

[font color=\'#000000\']If I couldn't bring a tripod to Iceland, I'd stay home. ::

Seriously, in summer the best light is from 9pm till 3am, when the sun is low on the horizon (of course it never sets at this time of year). This makes landscape photography conditions ideal but also means long exposures in many instances.

Combine this with highly variable weather, and the fact that the best photography will likely be done at the "edges of light" and trying to shoot hand-held all of the time means really limiting ones possabilities.

Michael[/font]
Logged
Guest
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2004, 10:08:46 AM »
ReplyReply

[font color=\'#000000\']I don't have experience with every tripod on the market, but in my opinion Gitzo offers great value and build quality.

I had a problem with the leg on one of my CF tripods coming loose after spending a week in 120F temperatures. The glue got soft and sand got inside. This isn't something likely to happen to most people.

Michael[/font]
Logged
Leif
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 8


« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2004, 02:10:12 PM »
ReplyReply

[font color=\'#000000\']Thanks for the feedback - my tripod is packed!

I'm off - thanks again.

- Leif[/font]
Logged
Leif
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 8


« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2004, 11:01:22 PM »
ReplyReply

[font color=\'#000000\']Hello - in consideration and esteem of present company, I'd identify myself as a bellow average but marginally competent SLR photographer. I'll be in Iceland for 6 weeks as part of the Snorri program (Snorri.is), June 13-July 24. I'll be shooting from a Pentax MZ-5N, with a Pentax 72mm 28-200 lens, and I'm also borrowing a high-quality 20-35 lens. I may also take a second body, but all I've got is a K-1000: still, that's nice and reliable, and I'm confident and familiar with it, while the MZ-5N is new to me. I will also have use of my sister's small digital Pentax Optio33WR, which will reside in my pocket for those unexpected moments.

I currently plan to take about 50 rolls of film. (I will be working and studying, so I won't be on the shutter 24-7, much to my regret. I am also a student, so budget is a factor, although I'm letting things loose in respect for the 'once in a lifetime' factor.) I'll also have a polarizer for the 28-200 lens. I don't tend to use a tripod, although I do have an old and packable one: I've got a steady hand, but I'm sure that would make some of you laugh. Any advice would be great on what types of film to take, and what not to take. Any other advice would also be most helpful.

Many thanks - Leif Einarson, Maple Ridge, B.C., Canada[/font]
Logged
alanrew
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 75


WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2004, 07:37:59 AM »
ReplyReply

[font color=\'#000000\']Leif,

Based on my experience of Iceland, the photo opportunities are so rich that 1 roll per day is a sensible minimum, so 50 rolls for 6 weeks should cover it. Iceland is an expensive place to visit so film costs are negligible in comparison.

Take a note-book to record what's on each roll of film. It will be easy to get confused with 50 rolls to sort through! You may even want to 'waste' a frame from each roll on a photo of a piece of paper with a film number and date etc. on it. 50 rolls of 36 frames is 1800 frames: they will need organising!

If you are shooting hand-held then take some ISO 400 film; nowadays film grain e.g. for Fuji films is fine enough not to be a big issue.

Unless you're using a tripod, then slow films like Velvia won't be worth it.

If you shoot negs you'll have more latitude for getting the exposure wrong. If you shoot slides then be very careful not to over-expose.

Enjoy your trip,

Alan[/font]
Logged
alanrew
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 75


WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2004, 09:47:58 AM »
ReplyReply

[font color=\'#000000\']Michael,

On the subject of tripods, you used to strongly recommend Gitzo, but then there was an article you wrote about product quality (I can't find it just at the moment) in which you criticised their build quality. I recall one of your Gitzos had broken in use.

What's your current position regarding whether you'd recommend Gitzo or not? Apologies if I've mis-remembered the article in question, of course.

Thanks in anticipation,

Alan[/font]
Logged
niels
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2004, 04:29:05 PM »
ReplyReply

[font color=\'#000000\']I can also only strongly recommend to have a tripod since the light is highly variable, and, first of all, the wind is almost always there to make you shaking!

And of course, like Michael said, the light is mostly wonderful during the "night", which isn't night at all... During the day, though, there are usually enough clouds playing with the sun and making interesting light patterns.

Overall if you shoot slides, you MUST take enough of them with you. One roll of ELITE chrome (sold here as "Select series" like in the rest of Europe) costs around 20 USD...[/font]
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad