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Author Topic: Need some advice on coatings and boards  (Read 5197 times)
mike_botelho
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« on: August 13, 2007, 10:43:14 PM »
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I just printed out some stuff on canvas at 17x36, which I intend to use as examples of my work.  As I said, it's just something to give people an idea of what my work looks like on canvas, sort of a big portfolio, if you would.  But the point is that these 17x36 canvases aren't intended for sale or display, so my main interests aren't presentation or archival properties.  However, I don't want to show people loose canvases and I don't want them to be damaged by handling.  So, I'd like to coat them to protect them from surface damage, and I'd like to mount them on some sort of not-too-terribly-expensive board, so they can be easily handled and shown to people.  

The prints are done on BC glossy canvas (which I really, really, like), and I've used a custom profile, but I didn't profile targets that had a coating applied.  So, I'm looking to coat with something that doesn't affect their appearance too much.  Also, the BC glossy cannot be coated with a roller or brush, so I need to spray it.  

In the future, when I do larger canvases, I intend to profile with something like Clearstar applied and spray the canvas prints with a HVLP gun.  But, for the moment, I don't want to get into the HVLP thing quite yet, so I was thinking of using the aerosol version of Print Shield.  And I was wondering, does Print Shield have a relatively minimal affect on the print's appearance?  I tried coating a proof print with Golden acrylic varnish, but not only did it dissolve a big of the ink (which had cured for 2 or 3 weeks), but it also darkened the print more than I wanted.

I think I remember hearing that the Print Shield goes on in a relatively fine layer and doesn't alter the print's appearance as much as a thicker laminate.  Is that true?

Also, I was thinking of using mounting adhesive and mounting the canvases on some type of board, just something rigid that would allow them to be easily handled.  Gatorfoam or something similarly expensive would be a waste for this type of non-critical application, and regular foamcore always seems to get dinged, so I was wondering if anyone could suggest a decent, not hugely expensive mat board or the like that would be relatively thick and durable though not too expensive?

Thanks and Kind Regards,

Mike
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SeanPuckett
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« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2007, 10:52:57 AM »
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In your situation, I would use a cold mount laminating adhesive to stick the canvas down to 1/4" double-tempered Masonite or Gatorfoam.  Then I would use an HVLP sprayer to lay down three light coats of Future, which dries nice and glossy and has no colorants.  I'd also put some felt bumpers on the back of each board so when you stack them up they won't rub against each other.

Addenda: the Gatorfoam people also make a similar product with a sticky side for just this sort of mounting.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2007, 10:55:38 AM by SeanPuckett » Logged

mike_botelho
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« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2007, 12:44:15 PM »
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In your situation, I would use a cold mount laminating adhesive to stick the canvas down to 1/4" double-tempered Masonite or Gatorfoam.  Then I would use an HVLP sprayer to lay down three light coats of Future, which dries nice and glossy and has no colorants.  I'd also put some felt bumpers on the back of each board so when you stack them up they won't rub against each other.

Addenda: the Gatorfoam people also make a similar product with a sticky side for just this sort of mounting.
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Thanks very much for the input.  I was thinking of using Scotch Cold Mounting Adhesive.  I don't know how it compares with other options, but it's available in large-sized rolls and it seems fairly reasonably-priced.  Or perhaps I'll go with the self-adhesive Gatorfoam as you suggest.

I was hoping to avoid the expense and work involved with using Gatorfoam and a HVLP sprayer until I started producing larger prints for display and sale, but I realize that this may the best way to go even for my current purposes.  Anyone know of a reasonably-priced source for Gatorfoam?  Any suggestions for a simple-yet-effective HVLP gun?

Sean, you mentioned coating with Future.  I'm not familiar with this product, and a Google search didn't provide any answers as the term was too generic, even with other words such as 'laminate' and 'print'.  Could you please let me know what this product is or where to find more info.

Thanks also for the suggestion about felt bumpers.  I had been a bit concerned about the prints rubbing but hadn't thought of that solution.

Thanks again,

Mike
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SeanPuckett
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« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2007, 12:53:52 PM »
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Future = Future Floor Polish.  It's basically an uncoloured aqueous carrier acrylic polymer, dries quickly but stays fairly flexible while shrugging off casual contact and dust.  Six bucks gets you a quart at almost any retail outlet.  I put it on all of my gloss canvas output.

Addenda: I am describing what I would do; I already have an HVLP sprayer (three of them, actually) and a roll laminator so there aren't wrinkling issues.  If you don't have this gear, you may find cost prohibitive.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2007, 01:11:42 PM by SeanPuckett » Logged

Alaska
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« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2007, 03:11:29 PM »
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Any suggestions for a simple-yet-effective HVLP gun?

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Check out the reviews for this HVLP conversion gun.  [a href=\"http://www.gleempaint.com/hvlp1.html]http://www.gleempaint.com/hvlp1.html[/url]  It use an air compressor in place of the typical turbine in a "real" HVLP system.  Get the optional accessory “package deal” as it contains the gauge, etc if interested.

The conversion gun will spray materials that are thin.  Since the cup is not pressured it would most likely not spray latex paint as is it too thick even after adding 10% water as the conversion system is a gravity feed system.  Another source may be Lowe's or Home Depot.

The CS9100 SprayTech HVLP is a very nice machine, but at $900 it is not for the faint of heart.  The conversion gun is sixity-two bucks with optional accessories.

Jim
« Last Edit: August 14, 2007, 03:14:28 PM by Alaska » Logged
SeanPuckett
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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2007, 03:57:09 PM »
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Check out the reviews for this HVLP conversion gun.  http://www.gleempaint.com/hvlp1.html  It use an air compressor in place of the typical turbine in a "real" HVLP system.  Get the optional accessory “package deal” as it contains the gauge, etc if interested.

The conversion gun will spray materials that are thin.  Since the cup is not pressured it would most likely not spray latex paint as is it too thick even after adding 10% water as the conversion system is a gravity feed system.  Another source may be Lowe's or Home Depot.

The CS9100 SprayTech HVLP is a very nice machine, but at $900 it is not for the faint of heart.  The conversion gun is sixity-two bucks with optional accessories.

Jim
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Jim,

I have the gun you show in addition to a straight HVLP gun and a turbine system, and it is indeed available at Home Depot under the "Husky" brand.  It's also available through Chinese tool merchants such as Harbor Freight (in the US) or Princess Auto (in Canada) under their house brands.  It's got adjustments and cleans up well and sprays thin materials adeptly.

If the OP has a compressor already (e.g. for nail guns), it's the way to go for water-based products like Future or EcoShield.  If you're going to spray laquer or oil-based products, though, you'll need an air line dryer/filter to keep the condensation out of your air or you'll get bad spray and possible fisheyes.
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Alaska
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« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2007, 03:14:52 AM »
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Sean:

Thanks for the good report on the conversion gun.  Have one on this end and its use is to spray on a water based varnish for picture frames in place of rolling.  Have not used it yet for anything but a test with water.  It does have a nice pattern and a cost that is a lot less than the Capspray (Spray Tech) 9100.

Usually use the 9100 for most finishing work and it will do a good job on prints once I make the jump to coating.  So far have been using Micro Ceramic Luster with pigment based inks and have not had the desire to coat prints at this point.

Jim
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bdawg07
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2007, 09:52:01 AM »
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I would highly recommend the Clearstar product.  We have used it in our studio successfully for nearly three years without any coating problems whatsoever.  I would suggest re-thinking your HVLP option, and consider applying it with a high-density foam roller.

In regards to your backing and mounting questions, canvas--being a fabric--should not be mounted directly to any substrate.  It shrinks and expands with temperature  and humidity and will eventually pull away from any substrate you attempt to mount it to.  Your best best with canvas is always to stretch it.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2007, 09:52:42 AM by bdawg07 » Logged

Adam Brown
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« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2008, 10:40:32 PM »
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Gleempaint, www.gleempaint.com, seems to have a good selection and good information - consumer to professional. I started with the Wagner Control spray but it is heavier since the turbine is in the spray head. Then I picked up a Campbell Hausfeld HV1120 HVLP Kit when a tool outlet company was at a local fire hall. With the HV1120 you have just the spray gun to hold and the turbine is on the floor.

With either of these units you need to fasten down the print or else they will blow around.

Personally, I would prefer to find an inexpensive roll coater but I can't seem to find anything on-line.
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