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Author Topic: PowerShot G9 with RAW  (Read 8627 times)
paulnorheim
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« on: August 20, 2007, 01:33:08 AM »
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Seems like Canon have been listening to complains about the lack of RAW mode in their compact cameras during the last couple of years. On the other hand: 12 Mp in a compact is strange when their 40D DSLR with the much bigger sensor has 10 Mp. Are the "consumers" still impressed, when they hear about more and more pixels? Do they never shoot with high ISO in low light?

Anyway, here is the press announcement from a Norwegian photo site today:



RAW power – Canon raises the bar with PowerShot G9

Amstelveen, The Netherlands, 20 August, 2007 - Canon today launches its new flagship compact for advanced photographers – the 12.1 Megapixel PowerShot G9. The successor to the PowerShot G7 – recently named EISA European Advanced Compact Camera 2007-2008 – the PowerShot G9 incorporates improvements driven by market feedback with a range of user-oriented enhancements, including RAW image capture* and a redesigned grip and thumb rest for improved handling. Other advancements include a high resolution 3.0” PureColor LCD II, enhanced Face Detection Technology and Red-Eye Correction in playback˛. A wide range of accessories – including optional lenses and Speedlite flash units – now also features Canon’s Speedlite ST-E2 wireless flash transmitter.

“A combination of advanced features, precision Canon optics and user-centric design made the PowerShot G7 our most successful G-series camera yet,” explained Mogens Jensen, Head of Canon Consumer Imaging, Europe. “By incorporating user requests and adding further enhancements, our engineers have made a great camera even better.”

The PowerShot G9 features:
    12.1 Megapixels (1/1.7” sensor) with RAW mode for maximum image control
    6x optical zoom lens with optical Image Stabilizer and SR coating*
    DIGIC III and iSAPS for lightning fast response, superb image quality and advanced Noise Reduction*
    Face Detection AF/AE/FE and Red-Eye Correction in playback
    3.0” high-resolution, PureColor LCD II with extra wide viewing angle
    ISO 1600 and Auto ISO Shift
    Compact body with dedicated ISO and Multi Control dials
    25 shooting modes including full manual control and 2 custom settings
    Extra telephoto reach with Digital Tele-Converter and Safety Zoom*
    Hot shoe support for Canon Speedlite flashes and optional lens accessories
*See Technologies Explained

Total image control
With an enlarged 12.1 Megapixel (1/1.7”) sensor, the PowerShot G9 gives photographers the flexibility to crop images and produce high quality prints up to A2 size. The addition of RAW image recording and simultaneous RAW+JPEG recording offers advanced users complete control over image processing. The supplied ZoomBrowser software includes RAW Image Task for fine adjustment of settings such as exposure compensation, white balance, tonal curve and colour temperature. RAW images can then be converted into either JPEG or TIFF format.

Canon precision optics for ultimate clarity
Exceptional optical performance is assured by the fast f/2.8 (W) – f/4.8 (T) Canon 6x optical zoom lens (35-210mm focal length, 35mm equivalent), which includes a double-sided aspherical lens element to counteract lens distortions. The addition of SR coating significantly reduces ghosting and chromatic aberration, while Canon’s optical Image Stabilizer technology counteracts the effects of camera shake. The risk of image blur is further reduced by ISO Shift, which allows an instant ISO boost whenever camera shake threatens to affect image quality. Benefiting from the large pixel count, Safety Zoom allows extra digital zoom with no interpolation – images can be captured at up to 15x zoom with enough resolution for lab-quality postcard (10 x 15cm) prints. Digital Tele-Converter adds extra telephoto reach to every shot (1.5x or 2.0x), without any reduction in aperture.

Improved Face Detection and Red-Eye Correction
The PowerShot G9 offers high speed operation and accurate image rendering through Canon’s DIGIC III processor, which also powers Face Detection Technology. In addition to focus and exposure control, Face Detection Technology has been improved on the PowerShot G9 to adjust for flash exposure – particularly helpful when using the flash close to a subject. A new Face Select and Track function enables the user to manually select and track an individual face from up to 35 faces detected in frame. Photographers will also benefit from Red-Eye Correction in playback, allowing in-camera removal of red-eye from captured images.

Designed for photographers
Built for photo-enthusiasts, the PowerShot G9 provides external controls that include a dedicated ISO dial, multi-control dial and customisable shortcut button. The analogue-inspired design of the PowerShot G9 has been updated on this model with a textured coating and a black alumite lens ring. A larger grip and pronounced thumb rest ensure secure and comfortable handling. On the back of the camera, a 3.0” PureColor LCD II offers several benefits. With 230,000 pixels resolution, the high contrast screen provides vastly improved colour reproduction and better visibility at wider angles of view. An anti-reflective coating helps in sunny conditions, while a protective layer guards against knocks and scrapes. The PowerShot G9 retains its optical viewfinder for extra framing flexibility.

Creativity unlimited
Advanced photographers will benefit from a selection of 25 shooting modes that includes full Manual, Av and Tv, along with two custom modes for user-defined settings. Shooting modes are complemented by a variety of features that assist creative shooting. Safety MF performs fine adjustments to aid manual focusing, while Safety FE reduces the risk of blown highlights when using the flash. Photographers can now choose a smaller AF frame size for finer focusing control – particularly helpful when using the camera’s 1cm Macro mode. Other useful features include an in-built ND (Neutral Density) filter, AEB (auto exposure bracketing), focus bracketing and a live histogram display. A new Image Resize function lets users downsize full-resolution images to 1600x1200, 640x480 and 320x240 sizes. This is equally useful for conserving storage space or preparing images for email or the Web.

Powerful movie functions
The photographic features of the PowerShot G9 are matched by a powerful array of movie capabilities. In addition to VGA (30fps) and high resolution XGA (15fps) movie recording, the PowerShot G9 introduces LP (Long Play) mode. This mode offers movies of half the file size without compromising on resolution or frame rate. The new Time Lapse Movie function allows the extended capture of changing scenes – such as a blooming flower, or bustling city streets - for accelerated playback as smooth VGA-quality movie clips.

No boundaries: Speedlite flash units and system accessories

With hot shoe support for Canon Speedlite EX series flash units, the PowerShot G9 is ideal for existing EOS digital SLR users or those seeking to experiment with creative flash photography. The camera supports the Speedlite ST-E2 wireless file transmitter for multi-flash setups. Additionally, the camera’s menu can be used to control flash settings for the recently launched Speedlite 580EX II.

The PowerShot G9 is compatible with a range of optional lens accessories, including wide (0.75x) and tele (2.0x) converter lenses. A waterproof case allows for shooting at depths of up to 40 metres. Offering a level of flexibility typically only found on digital SLRs, the PowerShot G9 provides photo enthusiasts with a camera that’s fully equipped to lift the limits of their creative potential.
Additional Information

Printing
Full PictBridge support means users can print directly to any PictBridge compatible printer without the need for a PC. A Print/Share button allows one-touch printing and easy uploads to Windows or Mac systems.

Language
The PowerShot G9 user interface supports 25 languages: English, German, French, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, Spanish, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Portuguese, Korean, Greek, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Turkish, Thai, Arabic, Romanian and Ukrainian.

Memory Card Support
In addition to SD, SDHC and MMC cards, the PowerShot G9 supports the new MMCplus and HC MMCplus formats for storage capacities of up to 32GB. The camera comes supplied with a 32MB memory card.

Software
The PowerShot G9 comes bundled with the following Canon Software:
ZoomBrowser EX 6.0 (Windows), ImageBrowser 6.0 (Mac): For organizing and editing images, movies and slideshows, or creating and printing digital photo albums.
PhotoStitch 3.1 (Windows) /3.2 (Mac): For creating panoramic photos from multiple images.
The bundled software supports Windows 2000 (SP4), XP (SP2) and Vista, or Macintosh OS X v10.3-v10.5. The PowerShot G9 supports PTP for driverless transfer to Windows XP and Mac OS X, along with MTP for image and movie transfers to Windows Vista. Purchasers of the camera are eligible for membership of CANON iMAGE GATEWAY*, 100MB of online ‘personal gallery’ space for sharing stills and video with family and friends.
*CANON iMAGE GATEWAY is not available in all European countries. Please see www.cig.canon-europe.com for available countries. Movie upload requires users to download and install the movie upload task, available after registration from the CANON iMAGE GATEWAY site.
Accessories
    * Speedlite 220EX/ 430EX/ 580EX/580EX Mark III
    * Speedlite Wireless Transmitter ST-E2
    * Off-Camera Shoe Cord OC-E3
« Last Edit: August 20, 2007, 01:57:57 AM by paulnorheim » Logged

paul norheim
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2007, 07:41:39 AM »
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Quote
On the other hand: 12 Mp in a compact is strange when their 40D DSLR with the much bigger sensor has 10 Mp. Are the "consumers" still impressed, when they hear about more and more pixels? Do they never shoot with high ISO in low light?
Excellent questions, Paul, but unfortunately non-photographers still make the overwhelming majority of small camera purchases, still barely understand what a pixel is, still cling to the belief that more megapixels = more wow, and are happy to use flash in low light. Even though the non-photographer is not the target market for the G9, given its feature set, I'm sure Canon's market research is correct that bucking the megapixel race would be suicidal at this time.

Canon has thrown us a sop in that they've used a 1/1.7" sensor, which is marginally larger than the previous 1/1.8" sensor used in higher-end compacts. Even so, the G9's pixel pitch is a mere 1.9 microns by my calculation, which compares to the 2.4 microns of my 8 mp LX1, and which is of course laughable compared to the 5 to 7 micron pixels common in dSLRs. It is possible, and even likely, that the portion of the pixel area devoted to light gathering instead of circuitry is somewhat larger for this sensor than for previous generation sensors. But this is hardly likely to do more than offset the increase from 10 to 12 mp. Instead, we have to take comfort in Canon's class-leading in-camera NR. If the G9 can deliver relatively noise-free and smear-free RAW images at 200 ISO, that would be a major step ahead of the competition. (My money is on their "cheating" by inserting a bit of in-camera NR before the RAW dump.) Another downside of the reduced pixel size is likely to be reduced DR, but with usable exposure controls one could at least keep from blowing highlights.

What also hurts is the 35mm equiv wide end; but of course here again they are reading the market astutely by opting for tele over wide.

But look at some of the up-sides: RAW, IS, a dedicated ISO knob!, custom settings plus customizable shortcut button, full manual exposure control, an apparently improved 3" LCD, and even a keyhole OVF.

In all, and based on the specs alone, I think we have to tip our hats to Canon for actually listening for once to customer feedback just as much as possible within the constraints of market reality. If RAW IQ is decent at 200 ISO and tolerable at 400 ISO, if DR is anything over 6 stops - that combined with functional exposure control and IS, would make this about as good a compact as we're likely to see for some time to come.
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paulnorheim
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2007, 09:41:58 AM »
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But look at some of the up-sides: RAW, IS, a dedicated ISO knob!, custom settings plus customizable shortcut button, full manual exposure control, an apparently improved 3" LCD, and even a keyhole OVF.

In all, and based on the specs alone, I think we have to tip our hats to Canon for actually listening for once to customer feedback just as much as possible within the constraints of market reality. If RAW IQ is decent at 200 ISO and tolerable at 400 ISO, if DR is anything over 6 stops - that combined with functional exposure control and IS, would make this about as good a compact as we're likely to see for some time to come.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=134298\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
[/quote]


Yeah, I agree with you, Dale. When I saw the specs, I immediately thought that this will be my carry around compact camera.

Still: if the people who actually take pictures tip their hats, but at the same time complain loudly about the more absurd marked decisions, perhaps Canon will one day make at least ONE high end compact camera not based on listening to photographers with one ear, and non- photographers with the other. I am convinced that this will add to their prestige as a brand name, and in the long run also too their sales.

So, I will continue to complain loudly and with a happy face!
Because RAW as an option is really good news.
I wonder how fast it will write the RAW file to the card?

Lack of better wide angle is hurting, but not hurting me. I already have a Ricoh GR-D, with the 28mm prime lens and a 21mm lens adapter. So I´ll be fine from 21 to 210mm.

In any case, it looks to me as if things are really improving in the compact camera segment. Ricoh has the interesting GX100, with the same manual controls as the GR-D, a 24-70mm lens and RAW. Fuji has the high ISO capabilities, and Panasonic/Leica has other nice features. Not to forget the coming Sigma with a 28mm fixed lens and APS size sensor (but a bit slow f/4 lens). Things are improving, and just SO close in technical terms to the perfect compact camera.

Who is going to make the 21. century equivalent to Barnacks idea of a solid and simple small format camera, the one Leica once answered by making the great rangefinders?
« Last Edit: August 20, 2007, 09:49:43 AM by paulnorheim » Logged

paul norheim
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2007, 11:01:20 AM »
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Paul Norheim wrote:
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Still: if the people who actually take pictures tip their hats, but at the same time complain loudly about the more absurd marked decisions, perhaps Canon will one day make at least ONE high end compact camera not based on listening to photographers with one ear, and non- photographers with the other. I am convinced that this will add to their prestige as a brand name, and in the long run also too their sales.
Well said; we can but hope. Perhaps one of the major players will start a sort of reverse-logic campaign - make an ~6 mp high-end compact and base their advertising on being the only company that gets it that ISO and DR are as important as res. People love to hear David beats Goliath, we're-smarter-than-They-are messages, when cleverly presented. Witness Apple's 1984 commercial.

Quote
I wonder how fast it will write the RAW file to the card?
Now that is a key question. At least Canon understands raw compression and has a rep for fast throughput.

Quote
Not to forget the coming Sigma with a 28mm fixed lens and APS size sensor (but a bit slow f/4 lens)
Of course, we all dream of an APS-size sensor in a compact and so will be looking very closely at the DP1 when it comes out. Apparently ISO is the Achilles' heel of the Foveon sensor. Plus, I suspect I am not alone in regarding the single, prime 28mm equiv lens (f/4 or not) as a show-stopper limitation.

Quote
Who is going to make the 21. century equivalent to Barnacks idea of a solid and simple small format camera, the one Leica once answered by making the great rangefinders?
Nice. I feel the DP1 points the way: Put an APS sensor into as small a body as possible - but answer that with a lens mount and a suite of interchangeable lenses. This could be the 4/3s system, if only one of the 4/3s players would get the idea that we need something about halfway in size between a pocket camera and an M8 or L1. What a disappointment the Panasonic L1 was: all the right ideas, then when you see it in person, it's bigger than some of the smaller dSLRs ... Right camera, wrong century. ;)
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Nill Toulme
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2007, 11:28:51 AM »
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It seems to me the fact that Canon reinstated RAW support in this model means they recognize that its market consists largely of "serious" photographers.  Given that, why in the world would they not put a 28mm wide end on it?  I just don't understand it.

Nill
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paulnorheim
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« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2007, 11:41:48 AM »
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"Put an APS sensor into as small a body as possible - but answer that with a lens mount and a suite of interchangeable lenses. This could be the 4/3s system, if only one of the 4/3s players would get the idea that we need something about halfway in size between a pocket camera and an M8 or L1."

Exactly!
But also Canon could do this, given their in-house produced sensors with better and better image quality at high ISO speed.

1) Relatively noise free images at ISO 1600, or even 3200.

2) A 25 or 28mm (40-45mm equivalent) f/2 or f/2.4 normal lens
and a couple of additional compact tele and wide angle lenses.

3) In-camera Image Stabilization.

Now, THAT WOULD BE SOMETHING.
And it should be within technical reach in 2007.
It would even compete with the Leica M8 and Epson RD-1 buyer segment.

With an initial price of 1000 US$ - or even up to 1500$ – for camera body and one lens, I am convinced that a lot of people who actually take pictures would buy it. I think the prestige of the DSLR would prevent such a compact camera from cannibalizing on the Digital Rebel, the 20D/30D/40D or the Nikon D40/50/80 etc. My guess is that a lot of photographers with, say, a Canon 5D, 1Ds Mark XXX or Nikon D200 etc would love to own such a small camera as an addition to their heavier gear.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2007, 11:49:29 AM by paulnorheim » Logged

paul norheim
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« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2007, 12:01:52 PM »
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Nill wrote:
Quote
It seems to me the fact that Canon reinstated RAW support in this model means
they recognize that its market consists largely of "serious" photographers. Given that, why in the world would they not put a 28mm wide end on it?
Nill: your logic applies to quite a few other aspects of the G9 as well, esp. the 12 mp res. My own take is that the G series camera's demographics must encompass much more than just us grizzled veterans. Notice the G9 has the cutsey program modes like Night Snapshot and Kids & Pets. To me this suggests they have to attract a large enough customer base to create the economy of scale to produce this camera at a competitive price point. This means the G9 has to meet the low-brow checklist of high megapixel count, long (6x) tele zoom, large LCD, etc. So they had to compete by having 200mm equiv on the tele end and if they had also gone to 28 or wider on the wide end, I'd wager the resulting distortions would have been unacceptable.

Paul wrote:
Quote
But also Canon could do this ... With an initial price of 1000 US$ - or even up to 1500$ ... My guess is that a lot of photographers with, say, a Canon 5D, 1Ds Mark XXX or Nikon D200 etc would love to own such a small camera as an addition to their heavier gear.
Wonderful idea: I never thought of Canon doing this; and we have their announcement that they are gearing up for their own CMOS sensors fab. Do you see them using Live View on the LCD or a rangefinder OVF? I fear the parallax problem and frame lines kind-of rules out a rangefinder. But Live View is so entangled with the bulky SLR + mirror box thing...
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paulnorheim
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« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2007, 12:04:58 PM »
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dpreviw just published some jpg samples from the G9.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/0708/07082011canong9gallery.asp
« Last Edit: August 21, 2007, 07:58:44 AM by paulnorheim » Logged

paul norheim
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« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2007, 12:23:01 PM »
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"Do you see them using Live View on the LCD or a rangefinder OVF? I fear the parallax problem and frame lines kind-of rules out a rangefinder. But Live View is so entangled with the bulky SLR + mirror box thing..."

Dale, it should not have a mirror (but perhaps an attachable viewfinder), and not be a range finder. I thought of something like the Sigma DP1 with just a little more speed on the main (or "normal") lens and, as you already suggested, an interchangeable mount.

Even, say, a 35 or 40 mm f/2.4 fixed focal length lens glued to the camera with the above mentioned specs (specially the Canon APS-size CMOS sensor and full manual control of aperture and speed) would be very interesting for a lot of photographers.

Simplicity!

And if they hired someone like the designer behind the iPod and iPhone to make a very simple and elegant design and user interface, who knows?

It could even become a best seller.
Loved by pros, amateurs, and even non photographers at the same time, just like the Mac.

I guess it would be quite easy to make effective marketing ads on such a camera - making fun of the complexity and opaque technical geek speek and the whistles & bells of the competitors, and then just show us how simple it can be done.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2007, 04:40:46 PM by paulnorheim » Logged

paul norheim
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« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2007, 03:25:40 PM »
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Is it likely that a 12MP RAW image, processed with external noise reduction software (such as Neat Image) and then downsampled to 6MP would result in a print comparable to a (base) 6MP RAW image also processed with noise reduction software?
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madmanchan
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« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2007, 04:51:38 PM »
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Gordon, if you plan to downsample a 12 MP image to a 6 MP image, then there's likely little need to apply noise reduction to the 12 MP image in the first place, since most of the noise will be filtered out when the downsampling takes place. (Some color noise processing may still be desirable, though.)

It's not easy to answer this question in general, because a lot depends on the sensor technology behind your two cases, the 6 MP sensor vs the 12 MP sensor. A 12 MP D2X or 5D image is likely to be very different than a 12 MP G9 image, for instance. Similarly, a 6 MP PowerShot S3 IS image is likely to be different than a 6 MP Digital Rebel image ...
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« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2007, 06:51:06 PM »
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Now that Fokti is back up and I've been able to download some of the samples - and in spite of my enthusiasm for the G9's specs - my over-all reaction is A Stop Too Far.

I understand that these are original JPEGs, not Raw conversions, I understand that Simon has cruelly accepted the camera's recommended exposure in very high contrast light and also accepted the camera's default JPEG settings. But still. Reading between the lines, look at the lens aberrations, the paucity of native exposure latitude, the noise at 400 ISO ... Of course, some good stuff here too, and certainly not unusable for many types of work, but hardly soaring above the competition in IQ.

Am I overreacting?

Gordon: another aspect of your thought experiment is: even if you recover in the noise department, I don't see you recovering in the latitude/DR department.

Paul wrote:
Quote
Dale, it should not have a mirror (but perhaps an attachable viewfinder), and not be a range finder. I thought of something like the Sigma DP1 with just a little more speed on the main (or "normal") lens and, as you already suggested, an interchangeable mount.
Nice ... If I put a zoom on the camera, does the finder still work?

Quote
And if they hired someone like the designer behind the iPod and iPhone to make a very simple and elegant design and user interface, who knows?
Woman on the commuter train on my way home had a Mac laptop on her lap. Gleaming white plastic case, shiny Apple logo on the back. Who can measure the appeal of a sexy design?
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Gordon Buck
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« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2007, 09:03:18 PM »
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Gordon, if you plan to downsample a 12 MP image to a 6 MP image,
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=134395\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I was just typing out loud some of the sentiments being expressed on the Internet today about the probable noise in the 12MP G9.  Many express the opinion that they'd be happy with six or eight "good" megapixels.  I sort of feel that way myself.

On the other hand, I already have a G3 (4MP) and the noise at ISO400 is pretty bad.  If the G9, shot in ISO400 RAW, noise reduced with Neat Image, downsized to 6 MP would provide a significant improvement to the 4MP of my G3 then I'd have a net gain by going to the G9.  In fact, that process would perhaps yield the same result as the wished-for "good six megapixels".
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« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2007, 05:59:18 AM »
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Hi!
I am a G7 user and very pleased with my camera. I've taken +1000 pictures and I have to say that this model is brilliant.
I have read some articles about the new G9 and it seem much better than G7. I am excited because I'm going to test G9 next week. I'll share my experiences here!

Bye!
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« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2007, 07:47:31 AM »
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When the G9 is made available I hope to see someone perform a comparsion between its JPG images -vs- its RAW images. So much has been written in recent months about what we have missed by not having RAW in the G7, now I for one would like to see just how much of a difference there is.

Much has been written as well about the RAW capability of the LX-2, but nowhere have I found a side-by-side comparison of its RAW images with the same image in JPG form.
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« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2007, 09:34:52 AM »
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So much has been written in recent months about what we have missed by not having RAW in the G7, now I for one would like to see just how much of a difference there is.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=134490\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

At least we know in advance that there is a big difference in flexibility: the increased ability to adjust white balance, contrast etc after the shot, not to mention exposure.
   
When you think about the tiny sensors in the compacts, it becomes obvious that RAW is even MORE important in the G9 than in the DSLR flagship 1Ds Mark III (the fact that the average compact camera owner may be less knowledgeable than the average high end DSLR owner, and use the camera for different ends than the average pro etc., is beside the point). The limited dynamic range, and the consequential risk of burning the highlights or loosing details in the shadows, is the main reason why photographers have complained about the lack of RAW in high end compact cameras during the last couple of years.

That Canon listened to the complains, is great news: hopefully other companies, like Fuji, will feel the pressure and make Raw available in their high end compacts too.

Just one more thing, Canon: could you please reduce the pixel density in the PowerShot G10 to 10 Mp?
« Last Edit: August 21, 2007, 10:38:28 AM by paulnorheim » Logged

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« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2007, 10:29:33 AM »
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Why is no one making a compact digital with a faster lens on it? Olympus's old C5050 had a 1.8. I would rather have a fast lens and worse iso performance.
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Anyone selling a 1DSIII or 6D cheap?
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« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2007, 10:45:29 AM »
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Why is no one making a compact digital with a faster lens on it? Olympus's old C5050 had a 1.8. I would rather have a fast lens and worse iso performance.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=134521\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Some of us prefer both the mother AND the daughter, as well as her three sisters.
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« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2007, 10:51:08 AM »
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Some of us prefer both the mother AND the daughter, as well as her three sisters.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=134528\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I see the same powdery look to G9 images that are present with G7 jpegs.  The only way to tell how good or otherwise the G9 is will be if we get some raw files to play with.

To be honest, the only reason I'd cinsider a G9 is if raw file performance is significantly better than jpegs, because the jpeg samples I have seen leave me underwhelmed.

Quentin
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Quentin Bargate, ARPS, Author, photographer entrepreneur and senior partner of Bargate Murray, Law Firm of the Year 2013
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« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2007, 11:56:48 AM »
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Paul Hilton wrote:
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Much has been written as well about the RAW capability of the LX-2, but nowhere have I found a side-by-side comparison of its RAW images with the same image in JPG form.
I can put up both raw and jpeg test shots from my LX1 if that helps. You can still download RawShooter Essentials for free, save the raw files to your drive, then open them in RawShooter. By manipulating the exposure control, white balance, etc., then generating your own output file you'll get a better feel for what raw buys you than just having someone cook up their own single conversion file for you.
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