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Author Topic: Using an HD-ready tv for video editing.  (Read 11499 times)
Mike W
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« on: August 21, 2007, 11:10:11 AM »
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Hi everyone.

I've got a question. Well, more of a "let's throw it in the group and see what the result would be"-conversation starter :-)

I'm pretty new to video editing, and I was wondering: instead of using a 20 inch+ HD monitor, could one use a hdtv instead? These things can be connected to a computer, and used as a regular monitor in general. I'm wondering what the up- and downsides would be when editing video.

Is callibration an absolute must for video-editing? (like I stated, I'm new to this)

thanks

M.
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smthopr
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« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2007, 07:07:13 PM »
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Quote
Hi everyone.

I've got a question. Well, more of a "let's throw it in the group and see what the result would be"-conversation starter :-)

I'm pretty new to video editing, and I was wondering: instead of using a 20 inch+ HD monitor, could one use a hdtv instead? These things can be connected to a computer, and used as a regular monitor in general. I'm wondering what the up- and downsides would be when editing video.

Is callibration an absolute must for video-editing? (like I stated, I'm new to this)

thanks

M.
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Mike,

Why don't you start with what computer and video editing software you will be using, and what format that you are shooting and editing. And what are you going to do with the footage when you're done with it? Web? DVD?...

FWIW, I'm editing HD on an old Mac G4 with no HD monitor to view on, just the calibrated computer monitor (an old Sony CRT display) I actually have a pro HD monitor, but no way to connect it to the computer.

-bruce
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Bruce Alan Greene
www.brucealangreene.com
Mike W
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2007, 04:29:38 AM »
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Hey Bruce,

This is more of a hypothetical question, but most likely I'l be editing in Final cut studio on a Mac (New Imac or MacPro). Output should be good enough for web and broadcast.

Just so you know, I am going to buy an HDtv along with an PS3, and was just wondering if I could use the 800+ device for work as well as play....

greetz

Mike

Quote
Mike,

Why don't you start with what computer and video editing software you will be using, and what format that you are shooting and editing. And what are you going to do with the footage when you're done with it? Web? DVD?...

FWIW, I'm editing HD on an old Mac G4 with no HD monitor to view on, just the calibrated computer monitor (an old Sony CRT display) I actually have a pro HD monitor, but no way to connect it to the computer.

-bruce
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smthopr
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2007, 10:21:19 PM »
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Hey Bruce,

This is more of a hypothetical question, but most likely I'l be editing in Final cut studio on a Mac (New Imac or MacPro). Output should be good enough for web and broadcast.

Just so you know, I am going to buy an HDtv along with an PS3, and was just wondering if I could use the 800+ device for work as well as play....

greetz

Mike
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Even if you can use the HDTV as a computer monitor, it's not the same thing as outputing to via an HD input/output card (may require the MacPro). If you output using the output card, then you'll be seeing a true HDTV picture (colorwise) and it will look as acurate as your HDTV can display it...

If you use the HDTV as a computer monitor, you'll be watching a quicktime version which will be less color accurate for HDTV use, but good for web use. Make sure you set your mac display setting to gamma 1.8 in the monitor preferences when viewing quicktime video (including thru FCP) as Quicktime is not colorsync aware like photoshop.

The good news (I think, haven't tried it) is that if you can use your HDTV as a computer monitor you may be able to calibrate it using something like the EYEone Display device. And the pre-cal section of the software will guide you to proper set up of the monitor itself through the monitor menus on the TV. This should make your HDTV accurate for normal HD viewing without the computer which is pretty cool. My pro HD monitor doesn't have DVI input, so I can't do this so easily (only HD SDI).

The downside to the consumer hdtv is that if you get an HD input/output card, it might only have HD SDI output/input and not DVI or HDMI for the consumer TV so you'll have to check that out. If  you get an iMac, this option may be closed to you anyway, but there might be some new firewire converter or some such thing you can use that I don't know about...

Lastly, If when you set up your TV menus, don't set it to "sports" or "vivid" or those settings. Usually something like "cinema" settings will turn off all/most of the image enhancements that come on with the other settings.

Best of luck with it!

-bruce
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Bruce Alan Greene
www.brucealangreene.com
Mike W
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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2007, 06:48:25 AM »
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The good news (I think, haven't tried it) is that if you can use your HDTV as a computer monitor you may be able to calibrate it using something like the EYEone Display device. And the pre-cal section of the software will guide you to proper set up of the monitor itself through the monitor menus on the TV. This should make your HDTV accurate for normal HD viewing without the computer which is pretty cool. My pro HD monitor doesn't have DVI input, so I can't do this so easily (only HD SDI).

Man, that is cool. I had no idea that one could callibrate an HDtv, certainly something to keep in mind when making a purchase.

Apparently, using a HDTV as a monitor won't be plug and play. So, I'm going to print this tread as future reference, and take it from there. Seeing I don't know if I will be able to afford a MacPro

Thanks for the help bruce.

Quote
Even if you can use the HDTV as a computer monitor, it's not the same thing as outputing to via an HD input/output card (may require the MacPro). If you output using the output card, then you'll be seeing a true HDTV picture (colorwise) and it will look as acurate as your HDTV can display it...

If you use the HDTV as a computer monitor, you'll be watching a quicktime version which will be less color accurate for HDTV use, but good for web use. Make sure you set your mac display setting to gamma 1.8 in the monitor preferences when viewing quicktime video (including thru FCP) as Quicktime is not colorsync aware like photoshop.

The good news (I think, haven't tried it) is that if you can use your HDTV as a computer monitor you may be able to calibrate it using something like the EYEone Display device. And the pre-cal section of the software will guide you to proper set up of the monitor itself through the monitor menus on the TV. This should make your HDTV accurate for normal HD viewing without the computer which is pretty cool. My pro HD monitor doesn't have DVI input, so I can't do this so easily (only HD SDI).

The downside to the consumer hdtv is that if you get an HD input/output card, it might only have HD SDI output/input and not DVI or HDMI for the consumer TV so you'll have to check that out. If  you get an iMac, this option may be closed to you anyway, but there might be some new firewire converter or some such thing you can use that I don't know about...

Lastly, If when you set up your TV menus, don't set it to "sports" or "vivid" or those settings. Usually something like "cinema" settings will turn off all/most of the image enhancements that come on with the other settings.

Best of luck with it!

-bruce
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