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Author Topic: Buying a Watch  (Read 20756 times)
HiltonP
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« Reply #40 on: August 24, 2007, 09:50:52 AM »
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I've always found it a bit difficult to tell the time on a Blackberry underwater.  
Michael
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Why do you need to know the time underwater?
Do you have a submarine to catch?  
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Regards, HILTON
Lubor
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« Reply #41 on: August 25, 2007, 02:51:59 AM »
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The article was about making a choice, not about a watch. And to choose, it's not as easy as one would think ...    http://www.sciammind.com/article.cfm?artic...00&pageNumber=1

Lubor
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Rob C
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« Reply #42 on: August 25, 2007, 04:44:14 AM »
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The article was about making a choice, not about a watch. And to choose, it's not as easy as one would think ...    http://www.sciammind.com/article.cfm?artic...00&pageNumber=1

Lubor
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Lubor, now whoīs being lugubrious?

Rob C
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Nill Toulme
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« Reply #43 on: August 25, 2007, 08:34:25 AM »
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I had to look up "lugubrious."  Lovely word, thanks.  ;-)

Interesting article.  I wonder if any one of us who frequent gear forums (and no, I'm not tarring LL with that brush) would score less than a 6 on that "maximizers" test.

Nill
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michael
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« Reply #44 on: August 25, 2007, 09:23:01 AM »
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Why do you need to know the time underwater?
Do you have a submarine to catch?   
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Just for the fun of it – a few places where I need a (waterproof) watch where a Blackberry or similar won't cut it...

... swimming, snorkeling, skiing, water water rafting, corporate locations that don't allow mobiles, customs and immigration halls at airports, on airplanes (some get uptight about wireless devices even when the transmitter is tuned off, especially during takeoffs and landings).

I imagine if I thought about it for a few more minutes I could come up with several more.

So, whether said in jest or not, a mobile phone is a poor substitute for a watch. On the other hand, my Nokia E90 syncs to the mobile operators time signal, shows the time in any city in the world, has multiple alarms, can get atomic clock accuracy from its built in GPS, has countdown and countup timers, etc, etc. But I won't take it swimming.

Michael
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Rob C
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« Reply #45 on: August 25, 2007, 10:50:47 AM »
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Michael, Iīm not surprised you wonīt take it swimming; perhaps it might take YOU swimming!

As far as the Submariner goes, even if I hadnīt thought of wearing it in the ocean and such watery places, it still appealed to me originally on the strength of its design. That was the first attraction and still is, for me, though I have to say, it does lend one a certain status in some circles. Iīve no probelm with that: if I canīt sing, I might as well have something going for me!

On the other hand, - or should that have been wrist? - the much more expensive gold ones donīt ring my chimes. As you go too far up the cost range you get into the diamond studded zone which makes the wearer look a little like a bookie (a turf accountant in US parlance, perhaps?), more nouveau riche than anything else.

Of course, was I able to afford one, I might view matters differently.... no, I donīt really think so.

Ciao - Rob C
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Nill Toulme
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« Reply #46 on: August 25, 2007, 10:51:06 AM »
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It wasn't said entirely in jest — in fact not in jest at all.  I used to wear watches but there came a time when the last battery in the last one died.  I kept telling myself I'd get a new one (watch or battery) but somehow I just didn't get around to it, and soon found that I liked not having the pesky things on my wrist.  

There are not many places I go without my Crackberry.  And, as somebody else mentioned, in today's world it's generally all to easy to find out what time it is.  ;-)

I do have to buy a new watch now though because I just got certified as a soccer referee, and the soccer pitch is one place where the BB is indeed not a convenient way to tell time.  And, admittedly, if I were a diver I would certainly want a good watch.  (But, happily, I have no more desire to go diving than I do to jump out of an airplane.)

Nill
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Rob C
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« Reply #47 on: August 25, 2007, 11:12:38 AM »
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Iīm with you regarding the airplane, Nill, but canīt share any of your enthusiasm for the soccer pitch!

Rob C
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pobrien3
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« Reply #48 on: August 25, 2007, 11:16:17 PM »
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Nill, agree about the plane too!  But the serenity, peace and other-worldliness (not to mention the very different photographic opportunities and challenges) of diving in tropical waters is one of the things that make me feel alive.  You don't have to go deep - on the right reef the best stuff is all at 10-30m anyway...!
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Nill Toulme
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« Reply #49 on: August 26, 2007, 07:01:28 AM »
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Nill, agree about the plane too!  But the serenity, peace and other-worldliness (not to mention the very different photographic opportunities and challenges) of diving in tropical waters is one of the things that make me feel alive.  You don't have to go deep - on the right reef the best stuff is all at 10-30m anyway...!
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I get that serenity, peace and other-worldliness standing in a river waving a stick (which is the other reason God made waders).  ;-)

Nill
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Philmar
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« Reply #50 on: October 11, 2007, 04:03:28 PM »
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Every single time I have tried wearing a good(ish) watch I have banged them against doors, walls, desktops, you name it. Every time I've worn cheap (sub $50) plastic ugly electronic things, they last for years and years. It's not right.
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The better ones don't scratch as they have scratch resistant glass.
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Rob C
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« Reply #51 on: October 12, 2007, 10:40:16 AM »
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The better ones don't scratch as they have scratch resistant glass.
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Then, sad to say, my Submariner must be less than good - it scratches almost by magic; perhaps thatīs why it scratches.

Rob C
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Lin Evans
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« Reply #52 on: October 24, 2007, 12:43:20 PM »
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LOL - it's interesting how watches can be like cameras - everyone has a "pet" brand or type. Over my 65 years I've had a number of wrist watches. My "favorite" is now my Rolex Explorer II which was, by the working man's standard pretty expensive (about $5,000 U.S. with tax) but has been virtually bullet-proof for many years. However 18 years ago before I bought the Rolex I wanted a decent but moderately inexpensive dive watch for a trip to Cozumel. My old Citizen dive watch has bought the farm when I bumped it on a large rock at about 100 feet depth and the shock added to the three atmospheres depth caused an instant leak. I wanted something which could take a health lick at depth and not leak and didn't want to spring for a Rolex Sea Dweller so my local dive shop had a watch guaranteed to take the pressure of 1200 ATM (12,000 meters or over 39,000 feet). Of course I didn't believe the hype, but I looked it over and read the information from the manufacturer and paid a bit over $300 and bought it.

Here's the amazing thing! I was a bit concerned because there was no way I could change the battery. The watch was filled with a very light oil. The entire watch including under the crystal and inside the case was oil filled so in theory, at least, it was essentially incompressible. I was told it would have to be sent back to the manufacturer (Hyperbar) for a battery change but that the battery would last "a long time". Here comes the unbelievable part - 18 years and it still keeps perfect time on the "ORIGINAL" battery!

It's been running continuously for 18 years and I'm perplexed as to how this is possible. New Hyperbar watches have a 10 year lithium-ion battery but I have no clue what they used in this one but whatever they put in it is absolutely incredible. It still keeps perfect time so anyone wanting a recommendation for a dive watch is going to get one from me for the Hyperbar. Mine was called the St Moritz but I don't think they make the same model any longer. It was made in Switzerland and they are available over the web. I believe the newer models have a "bubble" on the back where the battery can be replaced so it's no longer necessary to send the watch to the factory for battery replacement. In fact, I don't know where to send mine and for the approximate $400 price of a new one I probably won't bother when the battery finally quits on this one - LOL. One thing for certain - when I need another dive watch it will be the Hyperbar again. Another one will probably outlast me!!

Best regards,

Lin
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Lin
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« Reply #53 on: October 24, 2007, 01:51:42 PM »
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so my local dive shop had a watch guaranteed to take the pressure of 1200 ATM (12,000 meters or over 39,000 feet). Of course I didn't believe the hype, but I looked it over and read the information from the manufacturer and paid a bit over $300 and bought it.

Apparently it's not hype... http://www.special-forces.co.uk/sdw.htm

BTW, if the battery runs out, send it to:

HMP Watch Ltd
RIEDSTRASSE 16B
P.O. Box 218 CH-2544
Bettlach / Switzerland
Tel: 41 32 645 32 23     Fax: 41 32 645 32 23

Mike.
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Lin Evans
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« Reply #54 on: October 24, 2007, 02:54:40 PM »
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Hi Mike,

Thanks much for the address - I hadn't been able to locate the manufacturer, only dealers and after emailing a couple of them with no answers (I guess they would rather see more watches) I gave up. It probably would be worth sending it in for a battery replacement.

Best regards,

Lin

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Apparently it's not hype... http://www.special-forces.co.uk/sdw.htm

BTW, if the battery runs out, send it to:

HMP Watch Ltd
RIEDSTRASSE 16B
P.O. Box 218 CH-2544
Bettlach / Switzerland
Tel: 41 32 645 32 23     Fax: 41 32 645 32 23

Mike.
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Lin
DesW
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« Reply #55 on: October 24, 2007, 04:25:31 PM »
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  (But, happily, I have no more desire to go diving than I do to jump out of an airplane.)

Nill
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Hi All,
Interesting Subject the Watch-love em or hate -we need em at some stage ---some notes on the Posts .

Nil- If you have ever stood on the deck of a WW II Battleship at 50 m surrounded by schools of Fish you don't know what your missing!

The Rolex watches -even the expensive ones--I have the Oyster Datejust -WILL scratch unless you have the Crystal Glass face-this is only available on some models.

Hmm-- the one that will go to 1200 ATM certainly seems great value moneywise -- you would'nt be around to confirm it tho!

Des W
PADI OWSI #113416

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wolfnowl
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« Reply #56 on: October 24, 2007, 07:07:39 PM »
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Hmm-- the one that will go to 1200 ATM certainly seems great value moneywise -- you would'nt be around to confirm it tho!

I used to have a diver's watch that was supposed to be good to 150 feet.  Lost it in six feet of water, and by the time I found it water had gotten inside and ruined it.  I still have a Bulova Caravelle level-wind that's 24 years old now...

Mike.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2007, 08:59:09 PM by wolfnowl » Logged

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Lin Evans
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« Reply #57 on: October 24, 2007, 07:49:20 PM »
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Hi Mike,

Yep, that's a typo. The problem with water pressure is that any impact adds the "G" force to the atmospheric and it's really easy to exceed the water resistance rating if you have an accident. I was trying to pry a stubborn Abalone off a rock and the ab-iron slipped and banged the Citizen with several "G's" against the rock. It didn't break the crystal, but when they opened the case to check the battery it was full of salt-water.  I won't even take my Explorer II deeper than snorkle depth after that experience. I don't generally dive much deeper than 150' and then only a "bounce" dive. There's generally nothing worth shooting either with spear or camera deeper than that - at least nothing I want to tangle with - LOL. The Hyperbar has been to 160 a couple times but over the years 80-100 has been common and not a problem even though it's had some pretty rough treatment. I highly recommend it.

Best regards,

Lin

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That 12 THOUSAND ATM, not 1200!  But you're certainly correct!  I used to have a diver's watch that was supposed to be good to 150 feet.  Lost it in six feet of water, and by the time I found it water had gotten inside and ruined it.  I still have a Bulova Caravelle level-wind that's 24 years old now...

Mike.
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Lin
DesW
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« Reply #58 on: October 25, 2007, 01:03:22 AM »
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I used to have a diver's watch that was supposed to be good to 150 feet.  Lost it in six feet of water, and by the time I found it water had gotten inside and ruined it.  I still have a Bulova Caravelle level-wind that's 24 years old now...

Mike.
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B***dy Hell that brings back memories of those Bulova Ads with the magical tuning fork thingo-sort of a Greek symbol shape-- did'nt it oscillate forever and never need winding springs /etc?

On the so sold as "Diving Watches" their Achilles heels more often than not are the 0 rings in the winder/buttons with the wearer usually wearing same in the Shower( Read HOT water after a Dive) this softens the the ring(yeah yeah-I mean the WATCH one-sheesh!) and causes it to deteriorate quickly.

I  have been guilty of this and now rinse any Dive Timepiece in Cold water only.

Des
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Rob C
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« Reply #59 on: October 25, 2007, 10:08:39 AM »
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Thing is, youīre supposed to re-proof and service a Rolex Submariner every year. I have done so about three times since ī72 or ī73 when I bought mine. The first time, in Scotland, it was away for about two months; the next time, in Spain, they lost it for about the same length of time and on the last occassion it came back more accurate than it had ever been since new. Go figure that one out!

Iīve long abandoned the sea to the fish - the heaviest duty itīs had (the watch) in the last ten years is facing the inside of a pool. I took an intense dislike of the ocean experience - the shore, that is, whilst my experience and pleasure in boats died with my friend who had a few of them. The single, most important thing I learned from him about boats was that they are never big enough, even at over 90ft.; another thing I picked up was that itīs fun when you have a crew - you just leave all of the hassle to them. Equally, I also learned that a crew that doesnīt want to go somewhere will quickly find a mechanical or electronic reason why a trip at a precise time is currently impossible to contemplate.

The Rolex, however, just sits there on my arm, getting heavier and more loose as I get older and thinner.

Rob C
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