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Author Topic: Eizo CE240W Monitor?  (Read 9375 times)
Wayne194
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« on: September 06, 2007, 07:01:13 AM »
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I am looking to prurchase this monitor and wonder if any one has it or experience with it.
Is there another monitor that would be comparable to it?

Thanks
« Last Edit: September 06, 2007, 08:01:04 AM by Wayne194 » Logged
Anthony R
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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2007, 09:31:10 AM »
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Good info I believe. Depend on what you are looking for. I use a CG210 daily.

Eizo CE240W ? and monitor reccomendations

Subject: Eizo CE240W ? and monitor reccomendations
From: Robert Bullivant <email@hidden>
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2006 14:17:30 -0500
Delivered-to: email@hidden
Delivered-to: email@hidden
User-agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.0; en-US;   rv:1.4) Gecko/20030624 Netscape/7.1 (ax)
Dear Felicia,

We are an exclusive CG line Eizo dealer and have done extensive testing
with the CG220, CG210, and the CE240W. They are all excellent montiors. The
CG 210 and 220 use RGB panel that employs Super IPS (In-Plane switching). This is currently the best way to design an RGB panel as the viewing angle
is very wide...170 degrees...which means for soft proofing the operator, and well as a group of people can all look at exactly the same image on the
screen.

The new CE240W uses a PVA (Vertical aligment) RGB panel. Its less expensive to make, and therefore the monitor cost less. The accurate viewing angle of the CE240W is quite a bit less than either of the CG units. Its an excellent
monitor, but would not be my reccomendation for soft proofing in a fine art
printing enviroment. Eizo recently announced teh new CG221, replacing the CG220. Therefore, there are deals to be had on remaing CG220's, and the new
CG221 has improvements that may benfit you...so more choices!

I think before you jump into any new monitor you should consider a few things:

1) What will I really be using this montior for?

2) How long will I own it?

3) If its really accurate, how much will it increase my productivity?

If you have any other questions, feel free to email me on or off list.

Cheers,

Robert Bullivant
Bullivant Consulting Groupe
Saint Louis, Missouri
(314) 865-0077
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~


My old CRT just died and I am considering the ColorEdge CE240W. I like this
monitor's size, the 5 yr warranty and the native software that supports the
EyeOne.

I do fine arts printing for myself and other artists: much of my time is
spent color matching/soft-proofing and correcting images.

Does anyone have any recommendations?

I would love to have a CG220, but I will probably wait until ARBG monitors
become somewhat more affordable.
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Wayne194
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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2007, 10:40:53 AM »
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Thanks for the info.
I should have added that I will be using it for mainly photography work, Photoshop and Lightroom.
I cannot afford the cg series.

Wayne
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Anthony R
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« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2007, 10:51:14 AM »
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Eizo makes the top monitors, so I don't think you can really go wrong. It will far exceed an Apple Cinema or Dell and most likely NEC's comparable (sorta) equivalent. I'm looking to get another monitor for my home office and have considered the CE myself, but I'm pretty damned critical.
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Marsupilami
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2007, 01:18:02 AM »
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Quote
I am looking to prurchase this monitor and wonder if any one has it or experience with it.
Is there another monitor that would be comparable to it?

Thanks
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=137669\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Hi
I am using this monitor since 5 months and I think it is more than enough for photographic work on the computer. Certainly a cg would be better, but I doubt that you would do any wrong color corrections on the ce240w either. Much more important is to calibrate the monitor, spyder 2 would be an option which works for me well.
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Wayne194
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« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2007, 02:03:58 PM »
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I have the monitor setup and was wondering what you use for calibration settings?
I have a monaco optix pro calibrator.
Using the color navigator software that came with the monitor I just left the default calibration settings as they were.

80 cd whitepoint
6500k
gamma 2.2
Black point as shown.

Display looks real good but still a little light compared to my printed pictures.

Do you suggest any changes/

Thanks for everyone's input.
Wayne
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Anthony R
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« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2007, 02:59:16 PM »
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My cg calibrates a touch lighter than proofs also (Fuji FinalProof). You can adjust the overall 'brightness' feeling in Color Nav after calibration, just be careful with what you move. I would suggest highly against the gamma adjustment. It also may be that your output device (printer) may not be able to print the shadows that you can see on screen. Check your rendering settings and values of the image that you are printing. WIth how many great things these monitors do, Color nav. is not my favorite anyway.

Also, check that during calibration that no light is hitting your screen. I'm guessing that you are viewing your prints under a light box? If not, well then there isn't really a way to see if it's truly matching or not. One more thing, a print will never match exactly in luminance due to the monitor being a transmissive device and the paper being reflective (also depends on the 'white' of the paper).

end of ramble.

Quote
I have the monitor setup and was wondering what you use for calibration settings?
I have a monaco optix pro calibrator.
Using the color navigator software that came with the monitor I just left the default calibration settings as they were.

80 cd whitepoint
6500k
gamma 2.2
Black point as shown.

Display looks real good but still a little light compared to my printed pictures.

Do you suggest any changes/

Thanks for everyone's input.
Wayne
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=137934\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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budjames
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« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2007, 04:24:30 AM »
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I purchased the Eizo ColorEdge C240 about a year ago as an upgrade from an old 21" Formac Gallery LCD display. I also have a year old Dell FPW 27".  I also switched from a Dell Precision workstation to a new Mac Pro 8-core workstation so I have experience with the ColorEdge monitor on both WinXP Pro and OS X platforms.

The ColorEdge is simply the best monitor that I have ever used. According to Eizo, a big advantage of the ColorEdge is that the color calibration is done on the hardware inside the monitor which means that the full color bit resolution of your computer's graphics card is available to drive the display. With the Dell and other monitors that rely on color calibration on the graphic cards look up table, you are compromising color bit depth to achieve calibration. This is theoretical, but it makes sense.

I my case, I noticed when using Eye One to calibrate my Dell monitor, I had to manually lower the Red and Green channels using the display hardware adjustments in order to get the base luminance to the proper values. Although the Dell wide format LCDs are excellent, they are way too bright at the factory default settings for color critical operations like Photoshop.

I did not have any problems at all calibrating the ColorEdge with my Eye One colorimeter. The ColorEdge has it's own calibration software that works with a variety of colorimeters including Eye One.

Recently it was made public that the Apple Cinema HD displays are not capable of 24 bit color resolution and that they use dithering to simulate the full range of colors. This may explain why the Apple displays appear a bit coarse as compared to the Eizo. Of course, it could be my eyes too. According to a friend of mine who owns 2 Apple retail stores, Apple is supposed to be working on a complete replacement of their existing HD displays with a higher native color bit resolution. We'll see.

I love my Eizo display and I think that you will too. I just only wish that Eizo offered a 30" model for more screen "real estate".

Cheers.
Bud James
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Bud James
North Wales, PA
www.budjamesphotography.com
marimagen
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« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2007, 01:10:40 PM »
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Quote
I purchased the Eizo ColorEdge C240 about a year ago as an upgrade from an old 21" Formac Gallery LCD display. I also have a year old Dell FPW 27".  I also switched from a Dell Precision workstation to a new Mac Pro 8-core workstation so I have experience with the ColorEdge monitor on both WinXP Pro and OS X platforms.

The ColorEdge is simply the best monitor that I have ever used. According to Eizo, a big advantage of the ColorEdge is that the color calibration is done on the hardware inside the monitor which means that the full color bit resolution of your computer's graphics card is available to drive the display. With the Dell and other monitors that rely on color calibration on the graphic cards look up table, you are compromising color bit depth to achieve calibration. This is theoretical, but it makes sense.

I my case, I noticed when using Eye One to calibrate my Dell monitor, I had to manually lower the Red and Green channels using the display hardware adjustments in order to get the base luminance to the proper values. Although the Dell wide format LCDs are excellent, they are way too bright at the factory default settings for color critical operations like Photoshop.

I did not have any problems at all calibrating the ColorEdge with my Eye One colorimeter. The ColorEdge has it's own calibration software that works with a variety of colorimeters including Eye One.

Recently it was made public that the Apple Cinema HD displays are not capable of 24 bit color resolution and that they use dithering to simulate the full range of colors. This may explain why the Apple displays appear a bit coarse as compared to the Eizo. Of course, it could be my eyes too. According to a friend of mine who owns 2 Apple retail stores, Apple is supposed to be working on a complete replacement of their existing HD displays with a higher native color bit resolution. We'll see.

I love my Eizo display and I think that you will too. I just only wish that Eizo offered a 30" model for more screen "real estate".

Cheers.
Bud James
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marimagen
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« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2007, 01:18:18 PM »
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I live out in the sticks in a Mexican provincial town and I cannot test any Eizo monitor for there is none available here. I've read your comments and I want to know if an Eizo LCD monitor is really better than a plain CRT one for color accuracy. I'm a photographer and I work on raw files in Photoshop CS. Thanks in advance.
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budjames
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« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2007, 02:42:22 AM »
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Quote
I live out in the sticks in a Mexican provincial town and I cannot test any Eizo monitor for there is none available here. I've read your comments and I want to know if an Eizo LCD monitor is really better than a plain CRT one for color accuracy. I'm a photographer and I work on raw files in Photoshop CS. Thanks in advance.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=138060\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


No question that the Eizo ColorEdge monitors provide better color and calibration capabilities than most CRTs. The only exception that I can think of is the Sony Artisan monitors which are no longer manufactured. Artisan monitors were consider the "gold standard" for image fidelity by many graphic artists and pro photographers, but they cost many thousands of dollars more than the Eizo CE240.

But, technology of the LCDs continue to improve. I'll bet that the Eizo will also hold its color calibration longer than any other CRT.

You won't be disappointed in your investment in an Eizo ColorEdge. I love mine.

Bud James
North Wales, PA
« Last Edit: September 09, 2007, 02:44:58 AM by budjames » Logged

Bud James
North Wales, PA
www.budjamesphotography.com
marimagen
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« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2007, 10:47:30 AM »
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Thanks Bud. I had no idea LCD monitors had made such a breakthrough in color accuracy!
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