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Author Topic: Photo of the Year  (Read 18656 times)
kaelaria
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« on: December 13, 2004, 01:33:32 PM »
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This image had a slow start for me. When I first made it, it just sat there as a castaway. I lost my father this year. There is an emptiness that I have not dealt with because I am dealing with the lawyers, doctors, and leaches. Recently, I converted this to monochrome and tinted it. I speaks to me. I call it "Vanishing Point". This image is about the year 2004. It helps me connect with my inner self.

I really like that one, I would hang it on my wall for sure.
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jdemott
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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2004, 04:21:51 PM »
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Bob Kulon--

I lost my father December 27 of last year, so you have my sympathy--I know what you're going through. This is the photo that my family selected to put on the memorial cards we sent out in January. The scene is of the southern Oregon coast near sunset. I actually shot the photo last year, but it speaks to this year's feelings. I find it puts me in a very contemplative frame of mind.



John DeMott
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John DeMott
Leif
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« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2004, 10:43:17 AM »
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Wow! Thanks to everyone, for displaying your absolutely amazing photos! and thanks to Dia for starting this!

I feel compelled to offer some few select positive critiques, even if I'm not really qualified:

Didger - I think you're photo most amazingly blurs the lines between painting, language, and photography: the composition is quite incredible - suggests a geographic/geologic language of lithography or hieroglyphics.

Jonathan Wienke - your photo is truly the infant Mona Lisa!

Lisa - I was particularly stunned by your mountain shots: I grew up underneath the coastal mountains in the lower mainland of B.C., and I'm currently stuck in the flats of south western Ontario going to school. Your mountain shots are wondrously sublime! They remind me of climbing in Skaftafell park in Iceland: vertigo sensations very similar to what you describe, although my shots don't convey it nearly as well, and, truth be told, Iceland is rather short in the grand scheme of things, especially relative to the heights of the mountains your photos capture.

Cheers and congrats to all! - Leif
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Graham Welland
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« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2004, 10:21:42 PM »
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Pop Diva and the backing singers ... not the 'best' in a classical sense but one of my favourites.



Lonely and abandoned .... another favourite from 2004.
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Graham
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« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2004, 05:21:39 AM »
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Wonderful pictures everyone. Like someone already said I'd be proud to have taken any of them.

I think this is my best one this year.

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Julian Love
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« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2004, 10:47:20 AM »
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I went to Nepal for the first time earlier this year, and made the trek to the foot of Mt Everest. We spent a couple of nights camping at Gorak Shep, the last peice of flatish ground before you hit the Khumbu Glaciar and Everest Base Camp. Here you are dwarfed at the bottom of a vast amphitheatre of 7000+ metre peaks. We got up at 5am to climb up to Kala Pattar, a 5,500m ridge with classic views of the western face of Everest, the Khumbu Ice Fall and the South Coll. One of my favourite images was taken just as two of my friends reached the top, with 6500m Pumori behind them.



While I also like to colour shot, I converted it to a quadtone in PS to give it that "early explorer" feel, and used a gaussian blur overlay to render the mountain behind to give slightly more prominence to the two figures on the summit. For me the two tiny people they make the viewer appreciate the scale of the place.

I also took many "straight" shots of Everest, but my favourite was actually taken late that afternoon. Back at the campsite, the sun began to set. Slowly the mountains all around us fell into shadow until Everest, standing above them all, was the only peak still illuminated by the setting sun.



This is a straight shot, just cropped a little. Sunset on Everest - my favourite photograph from 2004.

Julian
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2004, 07:54:50 PM »
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Sunrise or sunset over the silhouette of an aircraft wing and engine nacelle.
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DiaAzul
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« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2004, 11:09:46 AM »
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To complement the top tips and techniques post in the Dig Camara Backs....Tecniques section, I also thought it might be fun for people to post their favourite photo that they have taken this year. Hopefully, this will provide some inspiration for board members to go out and try something new and unusual next year.

I'm not going to put any restrictions on subject matter other than no pets and family photos, but perhaps we should try and keep it in line with the theme of the forum. The funnier the picture the better, and all pictures must have been taken by you and taken this year. Some explanatory text of the situation and why the picture is your favourite would also be appreciated.



I took this picture in the Forest of Rambuouillet some 40km South West of Paris. In the forest they have a nature park and I was sat on a bench trying to take pictures of birds flying past with a canon EOS10D with 1.4x extender and 70-200 zoom. This owl unexpectedly landed on a post no more than 2m from me (curses...minimum focal distance was some 3-4m). I had to quite quickly roll over backwards in order to get this picture (which is very nearly full frame). I have other pictures which may be better (this one lacks a little depth of field), however, this one I particularly enjoy as I have a fascination for owls (and raptors in general).

Merry Christmas to all and Happy photoshooting in the new year.
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David Plummer    http://photo.tanzo.org/
philthygeezer
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« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2004, 04:13:44 PM »
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I'd have to say this one I took in the Adirondacks.  The year isn't over yet though.

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MatthewCromer
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« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2004, 11:16:46 AM »
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I was finishing up some late fall / stream photography as the light finished at New Hope creek and headed back to my car for the hour's drive home. Suddenly I noticed some very impressive color in the southwest sky, as I moved into a field. Even better, the late sunset color was decorated with a beautiful crescent moon. I ran hurriedly ahead towards a clearing in the woods splashed with the periodic silhouette of a mature loblolly pine. I quickly threw down my camera bag, ran out the tripod legs, and started to look for an adequate composition. The trees and sky were easy, but I wanted the perfect placement for that gorgeous sliver of heavenly body. Over and over I tried, and over and over I failed to fit Luna into the composition as I racked between wides and telephotos on the zoom. Finally, running forward another 50 yards, I managed to hang that glorious slice of light between two looming shadows with the late sunset light providing accompanying color. Done!

The 30 minutes spent tripping and falling through the briars and fallen logs in the darkness, wondering if I would ever see my camera bag and accessories again was unable to calm the elation I felt from what I had just witnessed. As the last rays faded from the sky I espied a small, dark lump on the ground a few yards ahead and to the right. The bag had not abandoned me! A feeling of utter completion to the evening's activities filled me as I finished my stroll to the parked car, packed away my gear, and began the drive home.

Serendipity, indeed. A picture I never looked for, that found me in the field. I was fortunate enough to witness it, and to capture a piece of that moment.
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Quentin
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« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2004, 07:22:39 AM »
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One of my (non-landscape) favorites was this grab shot of a Mauritian gentleman, displaying I think great dignity and composure (unlike me, a bit flustered Huh ) Kodak 14nx, 28-200 lens.



Quentin
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Quentin Bargate, ARPS, Author, photographer entrepreneur and senior partner of Bargate Murray, Law Firm of the Year 2013
Quentin
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« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2004, 04:16:34 AM »
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This is a fun thread - incredible range of work that I'm really enjoying looking at.  Keep it up, everyone   :laugh:

Quentin
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Quentin Bargate, ARPS, Author, photographer entrepreneur and senior partner of Bargate Murray, Law Firm of the Year 2013
rickster
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« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2004, 08:01:22 PM »
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Sheldon...

I was eating dinner in a local resturant tonight...I happened to look up and there was your picture of Mt. Hood and Trillium Lake hanging on the wall. On closer examination I decided that it was taken about two weeks earlier by the looks of the foliage. Were you at an overlook or something? It looks like this guy shared your tripod.

Yours is a beautiful shot, crystal clear, perfect symmetry, very easy to look at.

Gotta make sure I get there one day.

Cheers
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Sfleming
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« Reply #13 on: December 25, 2004, 07:37:17 PM »
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Flying Over Bafin Island:

I'm confused ...

and upset.

I can't figure it out and I want to very bad.  Very bad.
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didger
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« Reply #14 on: December 13, 2004, 12:03:28 PM »
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This is my favorite (of relatively recent work) by default. I've only even tentatively finished a handful of my thousands of Sierra images, and most of those strictly as forum feedback Photoshop exercises. This one was also such an exercise, but the only one that people seemed to particularly like so here it is again.

It's at the shore of a lake in the Seven Gables area and was taken at the first sunlight on that glacial polished granite. It was a very cold morning, but started to warm up instantly as the sun hit the rocks. The challenge was to really catch that feeling of warmth.

I know you said you want humor, but the only sort of funny situation I've run into backpacking was a lady wandering around in her camp totally naked early one morning.  Out of courtesy I didn't aim my camera in that direction and this isn't that kind of website anyway.

Uh, Dia, that's a nice story about how you shot the owl, but, well, do you really expect us to believe that this isn't a picture of your pet owl?  

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David Mantripp
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« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2004, 03:09:25 PM »
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Well I've shot a lot of photographs this year, but maybe this one will end up being my favourite. It was one of those "you've got 10 seconds to get this right" moments...



The reflections, the solitary person who has just folded his umbrella, the light in the immediate aftermath of a downpour... It just crystallizes a moment and the feeling of a place. The place being Piazza del Popolo, in Ascoli Picena, in the Marches region of Italy (like Tuscany only "undiscovered").
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Gordon Buck
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« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2004, 08:53:52 PM »
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My best one so far and likely to be best for a while. Wallace was concerned about the dim light in his workshop and asked if he could light up his torch. At that point, I knew something good was about to happen.

(OK, not exactly a landscape)

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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #17 on: December 17, 2004, 07:26:56 PM »
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Gary, that building looks like it's in Montana, maybe somewhere near this one:



One of my vacation photos from rural Montana.
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Sheldon N
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« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2004, 09:15:45 PM »
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Sheldon...

I was eating dinner in a local resturant tonight...I happened to look up and there was your picture of Mt. Hood and Trillium Lake hanging on the wall. On closer examination I decided that it was taken about two weeks earlier by the looks of the foliage. Were you at an overlook or something? It looks like this guy shared your tripod.

Yours is a beautiful shot, crystal clear, perfect symmetry, very easy to look at.

Gotta make sure I get there one day.

Cheers
Thanks! The viewpoint is very accessible, there's a road that runs along the entire south side of the lake, so it's basically park the car and step out and set up the tripod.

This was taken on a Sunday morning in October, about an hour after sunrise. I had been up at Government Camp all weekend, and it was absolutely socked in, totally gray and raining (though it was snowing up on the mountain). When I woke up on Sunday and saw the sunshine, I jumped in the car and drove straight to the lake. Fall colors were still there, and the first real snow of the season was on the mountain. There were a couple other photographers there as well, so I'm not surprised to find out that it's made its way around as a photo.

Glad you enjoyed it. It's still my desktop background, even though it's painful to look at the mountain when I can't be up there this season (Torn ACL/LCL on my first day of the season - Drat!).

Sheldon

PS - Which restaurant?
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cgordon
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« Reply #19 on: December 25, 2004, 08:52:55 AM »
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here are a couple of my favourites, both from a trip to nepal just last month.



...flying over baffin island...



...sleeping on the job - a well deserved rest day.

excuse the low-quality jpeg copies.
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