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Author Topic: Reflection shots. Opinions?  (Read 8356 times)
LoisWakeman
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« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2007, 11:54:06 AM »
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Not sure if you are suggesting to carry a "rhino's hide" in a camera bag, or where to get it. (Oh no, now in addition to sharks being hunted for their fins, rhinos are hunted by the photogs for their hides!)

But for those who want to receive honest feedbacks, a thick skin like a "rhino's hide" is exactly what they need.[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=138866\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Sorry - my flippancy was a bit opaque; the latter is what I meant, of course. Rhinos have a tough enough time without being skinned by photogs looking for kneeling mats!
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enlightphoto
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« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2007, 11:58:17 AM »
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I can't see the attached images, so can offer no critique. However, in reading through this tread and looking at the website, it seems this thread should address the bigger picture. The art of seeing is something that is learned. Some people have more natural talent, and others struggle with composing and creating more meaningful stories. Not saying this is the case here, but I see so many photographers that will spend hundreds or thousands on better gear, thinking it will make their pictures better, when in reality, those same photographers wouldn't consider investing that same amount in taking a few photo workshops specifically targeting improving technique and visualization. Aside from the first short negative comment, I feel the rest of what was presented was pretty spot on regarding the underlying thoughts.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2007, 11:59:29 AM by enlightphoto » Logged

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fike
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« Reply #22 on: September 13, 2007, 08:04:06 AM »
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That's interesting. Someone else (on this forum, I think) thought most of the Oklahoma stuff was too saturated. After looking at the Wichita forum (on my laptop which is not the most accurate display), I'm inclined to agree with you. Those are all film, mostly 6x7 Velvia and the chromes really sparkle. I think the loss of saturation is either in scanning (I have cheaper flatbed that does a poor job on film) or in PS (still much to learn). I am replacing those scans as I can but 6x7 scans are expensive and a 6x7 film scanner is worse.

All of my new film is being scanned as it is processed and I'm getting better results with it. I need a better scanner but...

Thanks, again, and thanks for the link. I have just looked it over but will study it in depth this evening.

RGS
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I was wondering about your scanning equipment.  Many of your images resemble some of my old scans when I was using a very crappy scan. The images have a slight desaturation, slightly off white-balance, but most critically, they are contrasty due to low dynamic range that is frequently a hallmark of flatbed scanners. The first image in Oklahoma is an example of this problem.  An all digital workflow does have its advantages.  I think medium format film can produce better than digital results, but only if your scanning workflow is spot-on.  

Another piece of feedback regards the time of day you are shooting.  It looks like many of the images that lack "pop" were taken at midday.  While I am not one of the people who says don't bother to shoot in full-sun at midday, you absolutely need to change your subject-matter.  Avoid shots at the horizon at midday.  Use clouds or natural shade to get good, strong diffused light for smaller compositions.  A bright hazy day can be great for focusing on textures.

So, bad scanner with harsh midday light can make a promising composition look very bad.

One critical thing about feedback is to focus on something you like, so here goes:

Colorado Rocky Mtn Park5 is pretty nice.  I might consider cropping out the path in the foreground, but the color and texture of the green rolling hills in the middle-ground are delicious.  The transition to blue mountains in the background provide a great backstop to bring the eye back down to the inviting grasslands of the middle ground.  Color and contrast are good.  Composition, without trail in front, is good.
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Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
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rgs
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« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2007, 08:40:24 AM »
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You're exactly right about the scanner. I've addressed that earlier in the thread. I am replacing the scans as I can with better ones and need to buy a better scanner.

The Colorado shot is an interesting choice. It is actually blended, from three different brackets and there is a halo around some trees in the middle right. Actually it's a cut & paste done in Elements. Now that I have PS I keep trying to improve on it but so far... I've tried an HDR, but PS says there's not enough dynamic range (it was shot about 4 years ago so I didn't plan on HDR) and I've tried some other blending routines that were less successful. The trail comment is interesting. I'll consider it.

Thanks.

RGS
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