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Author Topic: Another California Landscape  (Read 2473 times)
Jonathan Wienke
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« on: September 15, 2007, 01:33:29 AM »
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Here's another from my 2004 excursion:

[attachment=3245:attachment]

C & C welcome, especially on the colors, I did something a bit different and am curious what you all think of it.
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Tim Gray
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« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2007, 06:47:12 AM »
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Reminds me of some of my own experiments in applying a "Dragonizing" technique to landscapes.  In general I think it's a pleasant change from some of the oversaturated stuff that's out there.  What I don't think works well on this shot is the foreground.  While in Calif Dreaming, there was (at least for me) sufficient foreground detail - here it looks like some aging defect on the print has eaten into the bottom part.
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kikashi
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« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2007, 02:11:15 PM »
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Quote
Here's another from my 2004 excursion:

[attachment=3245:attachment]

C & C welcome, especially on the colors, I did something a bit different and am curious what you all think of it.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=139539\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I like the shot, but I'm more intrigued by "did something a bit different"! Do we get to know what?

Jeremy
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2007, 03:59:07 PM »
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Basically I start with a color version, and process and sharpen normally. Then I duplicate the background layer, convert it to B&W, and do a bit of additional sharpening and curves to get the best possible B&W rendering of the image. Then I convert to LAB mode without flattening and hide the B&W layer. The last step is to apply the L channel of the B&W layer to the L channel of the color layer.

The tonality tweaks made during B&W conversion and processing get applied to the final color rendering, but without affecting hue or saturation. That's what gives the image the lazlo/dragon look.
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kikashi
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« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2007, 06:35:36 PM »
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Basically I start with a color version, and process and sharpen normally. Then I duplicate the background layer, convert it to B&W, and do a bit of additional sharpening and curves to get the best possible B&W rendering of the image. Then I convert to LAB mode without flattening and hide the B&W layer. The last step is to apply the L channel of the B&W layer to the L channel of the color layer.

The tonality tweaks made during B&W conversion and processing get applied to the final color rendering, but without affecting hue or saturation. That's what gives the image the lazlo/dragon look.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=139628\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Fascinating - thanks. I suspect that's the kind of technique that those advocating a post-processing forum had in mind for discussion there.

Jeremy
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2007, 08:32:09 AM »
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Actually the MF guys are more interested in model skin retouch techniques.
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kikashi
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« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2007, 05:04:34 PM »
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Actually the MF guys are more interested in model skin retouch techniques.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=139928\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yes, so I see. I'm not a pro; I take photographs to get pictures for my wall. I've not put up posters like those since I was a teenager.

De gustibus, however.

Jeremy
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