Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: HIRISE Camera  (Read 1827 times)
wolfnowl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5744



WWW
« on: September 15, 2007, 07:09:09 PM »
ReplyReply

Came across this on the TV show 'Daily Planet'.  The HIRISE Camera (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment' is being called 'the biggest digital camera to ever leave earth's orbit'.  It's a part of the Mars orbiter that is circling a few hundred miles above the red planet.  The HIRISE camera is said to have a pixel size of about 1 foot square, which allows more detailed resolution than anything astonomers have ever had before.  And based on some of the images it's returned, not a bad eye either!

More information and photos here: http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/index.php

Mike.
Logged

If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
feppe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2909

Oh this shows up in here!


WWW
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2007, 06:32:05 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Came across this on the TV show 'Daily Planet'.  The HIRISE Camera (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment' is being called 'the biggest digital camera to ever leave earth's orbit'.  It's a part of the Mars orbiter that is circling a few hundred miles above the red planet.  The HIRISE camera is said to have a pixel size of about 1 foot square, which allows more detailed resolution than anything astonomers have ever had before.  And based on some of the images it's returned, not a bad eye either!

More information and photos here: http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/index.php

Mike.
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Indeed, HIRISE is easily one of the greatest accomplishments of human kind. Putting such a precision instrument successfully in orbit around another planet is a freakishly amazing feat, especially considering the poor success rate of Mars exploration in general.

There was an excellent article on The Planetary Report (The Planetary Society's membership magazine), which showed how HIRISE was being used successfully to find lost exploration vehicles on Mars. Unfortunately the article is not online, but [a href=\"http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00000858/]here's[/url] a blog entry from their website with preliminary data and some great sample shots.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad