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Author Topic: Can you lock your images?  (Read 6589 times)
The View
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« on: October 08, 2007, 01:30:18 PM »
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Can you lock an image against manipulations by a third party and/or "spying" into your work process via a look at your adjustments?

I am thinking of never giving out another original file again.

Except: if you can lock a file against manipulation and a view of the adjustments.

Otherwise, if you give an original file to a client, nobody can prevent a client's best friend to tinker with the settings, and ruin the image. And still it's my Copyright and my authorship on the metadata, as if I had done this.

Additionally, if you give out original files, any other person can copy your settings and save them as presets, and so copy your style.

So, is there an option to lock an image, or will one have to keep tight control over one's work?

(e.g. only sending files directly to the printer, never giving out CDs with the burned files, but only low res jpegs like in proofs, etc.)
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madmanchan
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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2007, 02:47:10 PM »
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An image can never be fully locked ...

Anybody can take a screenshot of an image, paste it into PS, and make adjustments.

If you give someone a flattened file and strip out the metadata, they might not know which adjustments you had made previously. That doesn't prevent the person from making additional adjustments, though.

If you are absolutely firm about having the prints come out just the way you want, with no possible additional tinkering involved from someone else, you gotta make the prints yourself ...
« Last Edit: October 08, 2007, 02:47:51 PM by madmanchan » Logged

61Dynamic
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2007, 02:48:47 PM »
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Here's how you lock files you send to clients: Send them developed Tiff files, not raw images.

If you are worried about people copying your style, well that can be done raw file settings or not. All it takes is some time, and the ability to see your image. People have been doing that for hundreds of years as a means of learning the craft.
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madmanchan
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2007, 06:52:41 PM »
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But, couldn't the clients edit the TIFF files in Photoshop?
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2007, 07:10:53 PM »
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Yes, but it's less volatile than sending a raw file.
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The View
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« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2007, 11:09:50 PM »
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Here's how you lock files you send to clients: Send them developed Tiff files, not raw images.

If you are worried about people copying your style, well that can be done raw file settings or not. All it takes is some time, and the ability to see your image. People have been doing that for hundreds of years as a means of learning the craft.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=144686\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks for your replies.

Why is it better to send a TIFF file than a PSD file? In which way are these file types different?

If it takes some time, and needed the eye, than this is better.

I just would feel uncomfortable, if someone could open the image, and see all the sliders and color channels and everything I did, and could just click " save as preset".
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The View
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« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2007, 11:13:14 PM »
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If you are absolutely firm about having the prints come out just the way you want, with no possible additional tinkering involved from someone else, you gotta make the prints yourself ...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=144685\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

If you go to a good printer and work with him, see hard copy proofs, than you can get relatively close to what you want.

But, sure, ideally you do your printing yourself.

But offset printing has some advantages over digital printing, quality-wise...
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tomrock
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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2007, 03:58:17 PM »
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Even if you make your own prints, someone can scan them and make changes.
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2007, 05:49:35 PM »
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Thanks for your replies.

Why is it better to send a TIFF file than a PSD file? In which way are these file types different?

[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Tiff are better since it's an open format. Of course, if you use any photoshop-specific options such as smart layers, that benefit is almost eliminated since it becomes an open format with a bunch of close-ended stuff inside.

Another benefit to tiff is it can be saved uncompressed saving a noticeable amount of time when working with larger files. The downside there is files become much larger in size which can be a problem when transporting.

[a href=\"http://www.oaktree-imaging.com/knowledge/image-formats]Image formats for Photography[/url]
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The View
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« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2007, 03:00:39 PM »
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Tiff are better since it's an open format. Of course, if you use any photoshop-specific options such as smart layers, that benefit is almost eliminated since it becomes an open format with a bunch of close-ended stuff inside.

Another benefit to tiff is it can be saved uncompressed saving a noticeable amount of time when working with larger files. The downside there is files become much larger in size which can be a problem when transporting.

Image formats for Photography
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=144944\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks for this link!
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genemcc
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« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2007, 03:11:06 PM »
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One other suggestion is to put the image(s) in a PDF and then lock that down.  They won't be able to manipulate or print it without the password.

While this won't stop someone from screen capturing the image from the PDF is is another obstacle.  It allows the recipient to see it and zoom in etc. but makes it harder to play with.  
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DavidW
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« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2007, 05:23:53 PM »
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One other suggestion is to put the image(s) in a PDF and then lock that down.  They won't be able to manipulate or print it without the password.

While this won't stop someone from screen capturing the image from the PDF is is another obstacle.  It allows the recipient to see it and zoom in etc. but makes it harder to play with.   
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=146179\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
The passwords that can be applied to restrict user rights on PDF files are, unfortunately, rather weak. Some non-Adobe software ignores them completely.


In the end, the only way to stop people manipulating your images is not to give them the digital files. Many people only give out small files (640 pixels on the longest side) or they watermark the files in such a way that it would take tremendous effort to clone out the watermark.



David
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The View
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« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2007, 03:02:09 AM »
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The passwords that can be applied to restrict user rights on PDF files are, unfortunately, rather weak. Some non-Adobe software ignores them completely.
In the end, the only way to stop people manipulating your images is not to give them the digital files. Many people only give out small files (640 pixels on the longest side) or they watermark the files in such a way that it would take tremendous effort to clone out the watermark.
David
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=146210\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Low resolution JPEGs are the way to go then.

I will think of a good and short explanation for clients...
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