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Author Topic: Adobe moving to the web  (Read 78471 times)
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2008, 10:10:11 AM »
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As soon as all our old (some still in dos) applications are converted to run over the web, all our pc's will only have XP-Pro and a browser installed.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=205929\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

In that scenario, why do you need XP?

You will note that google is one of the main supporters of SaS...

Cheers,
Bernard
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cgf
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« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2008, 10:15:32 AM »
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In that scenario, why do you need XP?

You will note that google is one of the main supporters of SaS...

Cheers,
Bernard
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=205937\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Don't computers need an operating system? Sorry I am not in IT.

I know our IT people are avoiding Vista like the plague, so assumed they'd stick with XP-Pro, I suppose a non-windows os could be used?

Cheers...
Fergus
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #22 on: July 06, 2008, 10:53:43 AM »
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Don't computers need an operating system? Sorry I am not in IT.

I know our IT people are avoiding Vista like the plague, so assumed they'd stick with XP-Pro, I suppose a non-windows os could be used?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=205940\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Well yes, you need some sort of OS, but something a lot more basic that XP/Vista would probably be enough if all applications were to be web applications.

I don't believe that this will happen very soon though.

Cheers,
Bernard
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joneil
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« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2008, 07:09:19 AM »
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I've been using adobe products, registered & fully legit, since the days of Windows 3.1.  Don't know how many years that is now, but I totally disagree with this new business model for many reasons.  Just a *few* of them off the top of my head:

1) What if there is no internet?

    Completely serious about this.  I use my laptop in the field while camping, often far away from any wireless or internet hook up.  I need the product installed on my hard drive, period.

2) Privacy  Issues.

   So many problems here, I don't know where to begin.  If not for myself, then for my clients, I handle some very private data.   I have no idea what kind of information is being transmitted back to whom or where when I use a web based program.  Perhaps it doesn't matter to most of you, but I am in a business where i have to be able to guarantee to the best reasonable effort that their privacy & information is protected.  I simply cannot do that with ANY web based program.   That's why I keep my firewall running and i do not allow my adobe products to automatically connect to the web every time I fire them up.

3) Poor Upgrades.

     I have found, including adobe products, that many so called "upgrades" are terrible, and quite often raise as many new problems as they solve.  For that reason, I never, ever jump to an upgrade as soon as it is available - I always wait a bit, and let others be the beta testers.  I will not have that option with web based programs.

4) Cost issues.

    I have a stove that is 25 years old, and some of my large format lenses are older than that, they all work great.  I use a 30 year old 300mm tleephoto on my Nikon digitial SLR.
            When I tell people these things, I often get a response to the effect "oh, you should get a new one right away!"  When I ask "why, what I have works fine."  I often get dumbfounded looks.

    The current business model is to convince the general public they need new upgrade, whether they do any good or not.   For example, I've gone from Pagemaker 5 to 6.5 to 7 to now using InDesign.    You want to know something?  The interface in version 5 was the simplest and for me, the most productive of all the versions.

    While the new programs have some new features that have proved handy, the point is, if it were still compatable, plain old version 5 of Pagemaker would still serve 99% of what I need to do.

 And perhaps this is the irony for all of you.  I mean this as no offense, and I always ahve to seem to say that because on the internet people always seem to assume you mean to offend them for whatever reason, but for guys like me who use Pagemaker or Photoshop for every day business use, that is to put food on the table, and pay bills, upgrading is often the last thing you want to do.  Where does the money come from for the new training for the new hardware and the new software?  I have to put gas in my car too, and i don't have any spare cash lying around today.

  My "offensive" point is then, reading the forums here and on other photo based forums, you often tell the difference from the person who uses the products (hardware & software) discussed on these forums by thier reaction to upgrades.  The person in it for hobby, or at the very least, not concerned with meeting a payroll, will always be the one jumping in and say "oh, as soon as that come out, I'm gonna upgrade!".  Whereas the guy like me who has to use it to make ends meet, and is dealing with customers who are constantly looking for a lower price, the upgrades are a PITA.

  So, I think for end users like me, in a business enviroment, the web based products are going to be a nightmare on many, many levels.   I honestly don't know what i am going to do about it in the future.
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nemophoto
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« Reply #24 on: July 09, 2008, 09:36:21 PM »
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I would never own/run software that is internet based. I don't want to be at the mercy of bandwidth, network slowdowns or outages. While I'm based in NYC, I live in the hinterlands of PA. Before we somewhat meraculously got DSL, we used Starband satellite service. The DSL is a modicum faster, but has been stuck at 512Kb down/128Kb up for four years -- and is likely to stay that way. Where I use to live in VA, the ONLY option is still satellite if you want high-speed, and that was right outside DC.

Internet-based software may be great for those fortunate enough to have 5Mb service (and actually get it -- my contract says speeds UP TO 1.5Mb/s -- yeah, right). We bitch and complain about the speed of software or hard drives or computers already. Who really wants to add internet into the speed equation? At times, I shoot in areas where there is no internet access -- either via the hotel or my broadband wireless card. What does one do in those situations?

Nemo
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #25 on: July 09, 2008, 09:53:35 PM »
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What does one do in those situations?
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

On this particular question see, as one posisble solution, [a href=\"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_gears]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_gears[/url]

But then again, this is obviously not perfect.

For a more general answer on SaS see my post above.

Cheers,
Bernard
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Tim Gray
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« Reply #26 on: November 18, 2011, 06:04:04 AM »
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I first started this thread in 2007 and the concept wasn't enthusiastically received - I thought then that an option for "software as a service" or as they call it today - "cloud" was inevitable.  I resurrect this stale post to see to what extent peoples appetite for this kind of delivery channel might have changed.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #27 on: November 18, 2011, 06:39:58 AM »
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http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=59358.0
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 08:01:23 AM by BobFisher » Logged
Rhossydd
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« Reply #28 on: November 18, 2011, 07:21:25 AM »
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I resurrect this stale post to see to what extent peoples appetite for this kind of delivery channel might have changed.
It's still a rubbish idea I won't buy into.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #29 on: November 18, 2011, 08:38:16 AM »
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It's still a rubbish idea I won't buy into.
I agree. I think the only views that have changed since 2007 are those of the marketing folks at Adobe.

Eric
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bteifeld
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« Reply #30 on: November 18, 2011, 03:15:13 PM »
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I would question the efficacy of any color-managed work taking place in a software as a service context. Can someone explain to me why I can trust the color will be accurately rendered through a web browser?
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feppe
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« Reply #31 on: November 18, 2011, 03:28:58 PM »
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I would question the efficacy of any color-managed work taking place in a software as a service context. Can someone explain to me why I can trust the color will be accurately rendered through a web browser?

SaaS doesn't necessarily (or even usually) imply browser UI.

Adobe's products are downloaded to your HDD, and need (re)activation monthly via internet, otherwise they are more or less like "normal" Adobe products, AFAICT.
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Steve Weldon
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« Reply #32 on: November 18, 2011, 05:09:03 PM »
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This just isn't software.  A "monthly fee" payment scheme has been used as far back as the monthly telephone bill (probably further for services on a smaller scale), then the 'cable' bill, pest control services, internet service, mobile phone service, service contracts of all type..  everyone is getting in line to get their monthly check from you, preferably via a convenient automatic transfer from your bank account.  Never holding the cash in your hand, is to diminish the value so you'll spend more.  So why not software?  We've let the others into our lives so it stands to reason we'll let in more.  Business owners are counting on it.  And if they can pad that payment with extra services, over usage fees, late fees, and in the case of car and home loans.. interest.. then so much the better.

Amazon has built a multi-billion dollar retain business on this model.  Make it easy for the consumer to shop, to pay, and to do business.. and they will.  Make a consumer travel to a shop, wait in line, endure crowds or traffic.. and they'll put it off as long as they can.

Our only defense is to weed out the services we must have from those we don't.  Unfortunately most consumers haven't the discipline.  I'm sure there are advantages to online software.. but I can't imagine them outweighing the evils of service contracts.
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sniper
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« Reply #33 on: November 19, 2011, 10:43:06 AM »
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SaaS doesn't necessarily (or even usually) imply browser UI.

Adobe's products are downloaded to your HDD, and need (re)activation monthly via internet, otherwise they are more or less like "normal" Adobe products, AFAICT.
Personally I don't want internet access on a computer I rely on to make my living, my editing computer isn't connected to the web, that avoids the risk of remote access or viruses affecting my wokflow.  
To be honest even with a good fibre optic broadband connection it's still subject to problems, do I want to risk not being able to work just because my internet falls over.  No Thanks
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Rob C
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« Reply #34 on: November 19, 2011, 02:19:30 PM »
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Personally I don't want internet access on a computer I rely on to make my living, my editing computer isn't connected to the web, that avoids the risk of remote access or viruses affecting my wokflow.  
To be honest even with a good fibre optic broadband connection it's still subject to problems, do I want to risk not being able to work just because my internet falls over.  No Thanks



Damned right!

I no longer do this for a living, but my photography computer is not connected to the web either, unless temporarily for some vital purpose that can't be avoided. Why add risk to life that's already overflowing with it?

The banks also try to force me to go internet, but then, at the end of their own sell, I find the little warning that it is not foolproof and that you need this, that and the other defence before they will accept responsibility for problems arising from use online! Yeah, right.

Rob C
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daws
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« Reply #35 on: November 19, 2011, 07:17:01 PM »
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Personally I won't be signing up to an online service, there are allways other companies willing to take over if theres a gap in the market, I'll just use something else, if Adobe don't want my money...... someone else will.  Wayne

Ditto.

Happy moving, Adobe. You'll be moving without me. Over the years I've purchased thousands of dollars worth of Photoshop, Premiere, After Effects and Audition. In the future, I'll be happy to invest it in the developers* who even now are preparing to cash in on your soon-to-be former customers.


*Including, I'm sure, any number of soon-to-be former Adobe software wizards.



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feppe
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« Reply #36 on: November 19, 2011, 08:21:42 PM »
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Ditto.

Happy moving, Adobe. You'll be moving without me. Over the years I've purchased thousands of dollars worth of Photoshop, Premiere, After Effects and Audition. In the future, I'll be happy to invest it in the developers* who even now are preparing to cash in on your soon-to-be former customers.


*Including, I'm sure, any number of soon-to-be former Adobe software wizards.

On that topic, I just saw that LightZone is dead Sad There are rumors that it might get open-sourced - here's hoping! It had the best and most intuitive UI for curves/levels adjustment, essentially a digital post-processing zone system, years ahead of PS/LR clunky and coarse curves interface.

Well, GIMP is alive and kicking.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #37 on: November 20, 2011, 06:43:28 AM »
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That's too bad.  Lightzone was a decent program.  Had some really nice features.  And yes, the UI was pretty intuitive.  I found it had some problems with colour, particularly in printing but that was several years ago and the problems may have been resolved.
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ixania2
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« Reply #38 on: November 22, 2011, 01:55:00 AM »
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In my view lightzone was quite crap from the beginning (and ive been buying it from the start), including the ui. No surprise theyre dead now.
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Steve House
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« Reply #39 on: November 22, 2011, 05:43:50 AM »
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Absolutely and positively NOT interested in "cloud" computing at all.  The operative word in the phrase "personal computer" is "personal" and the whole impetus behind the PC revolution was to replace the centralized, controlled "data processing" infrastructure with computer power that was under the direct and sole control of the user of those resources.  Empowering the individual user and freeing him from centralized control was the driving force.  The Cloud marks a return to the bad old days.  Yes it has some advantages but the costs in privacy and surrender of the immediate personal control of one's assets far outweighs them in my opinion.

Consider the consequences of an unexpected communication failure 15 minutes before your Big Presentation is due to begin if your slide desk resides in the Cloud.  Consider the consequences of an administrative screwup causing your subscription payment this month to get lost.  Consider the consequences of the sudden bankruptcy of the company that operates your data storage service whose servers house all your archive files causing the servers to go dark.
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