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Author Topic: The Online Photographer  (Read 3578 times)
wolfnowl
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« on: November 07, 2007, 08:22:42 PM »
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Hi Folks:

I drop by Mike Johnston's blog page periodically to see what he's been up to, and there was an article there that caught me as funny.  The first part of it is here:

"Strange Doings on eBay

I've just watched the ending to a most strange eBay auction. A used field view camera in like-new condition sold for $1,225. The strange thing about it was, the exact same camera brand new (that is, actually new, as opposed to like new) is available any time for $695.

Why would anybody want to pay $1,225 for a camera they could get for $695? Are they not yet initiated into the mysteries of that strange web function known as "Google"? Or is it just worth that much of a premium to them to "shop victoriously"?

This is hardly the only such example on eBay. I used to be mystified that used Ilford EM-10 enlarging meters would go for more on eBay than they cost new at B&H photo. And just a few days ago I watched a photography book sell for $49 after some fairly intense bidding—which is strange, since a quick search of both Abebooks and Alibris turned up perfectly fine overstock copies of the same book selling for $6 plus a few bucks postage (yes, I did check to see that there wasn't some minor but key difference that could account for the disparity. There wasn't. Same book, same edition, same condition)..."

The full article is here:
http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/t...ge-doings-.html

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
Chris_T
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« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2007, 08:16:16 AM »
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There is nothing strange about this. EBay is a sellers' market, not a buyers'. Think of it this way: a seller typically only has one item to sell, and there are hordes of buyers out there. It only takes a single dumb buyer to overbid the item. And there are hordes of them out there! This is the same principle that the online scammers base their mass mailing technique on.

In the early days of eBay or the even older days of buy/sell newsgroups, good deals could be found. But now it is almost impossible to find a good deal on eBay, especially for the hot items extensively reviewed online. Consumer education at its best?

Ultimately, eBay is the one laughing to the bank.

Quote
Hi Folks:

I drop by Mike Johnston's blog page periodically to see what he's been up to, and there was an article there that caught me as funny.  The first part of it is here:

"Strange Doings on eBay

I've just watched the ending to a most strange eBay auction. A used field view camera in like-new condition sold for $1,225. The strange thing about it was, the exact same camera brand new (that is, actually new, as opposed to like new) is available any time for $695.

Why would anybody want to pay $1,225 for a camera they could get for $695? Are they not yet initiated into the mysteries of that strange web function known as "Google"? Or is it just worth that much of a premium to them to "shop victoriously"?

This is hardly the only such example on eBay. I used to be mystified that used Ilford EM-10 enlarging meters would go for more on eBay than they cost new at B&H photo. And just a few days ago I watched a photography book sell for $49 after some fairly intense bidding—which is strange, since a quick search of both Abebooks and Alibris turned up perfectly fine overstock copies of the same book selling for $6 plus a few bucks postage (yes, I did check to see that there wasn't some minor but key difference that could account for the disparity. There wasn't. Same book, same edition, same condition)..."

The full article is here:
http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/t...ge-doings-.html

Mike.
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plunkettphoto
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« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2007, 08:01:45 AM »
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I buy on eBuy sometimes.  It's really pretty safe.  Check the feedback, decide the value of the product, decide its maximum value to YOU, then go to a site like bidnapper, set you max bid and forget it.  

At the last minute, bidnapper jumps in and automatically bids in small increments up to your max.  you don't get caught up in bidding wars which don't even start until the last few seconds.....

cheers,
b
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Philmar
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« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2008, 04:32:17 PM »
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I love to buy watches on eBay. Usually there are several listings for the model/brand I am looking for. I usually put a low bid on the one I want and do not get involved in any bid wars because I know the exact same model is listed elsewhere and several more will be listed again in the future.
Often someone makes a few last minute bids that pip my initial bid. I usually get what I want - eventually. Just need to be patient.  I find I get Seikos, Citizens for about 60% of what I'd pay for them at a retail store here in Canada.
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An office drone pension administrator by day and a photo-enthusiast by night, week-end and on vacation who carries his camera when traveling the world:
Please have a chew on my photos:
http://www.fluidr.com/photos/phil_marion/sets
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