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Author Topic: Canon 70-200 F2.8L IS Lens Question  (Read 8166 times)
Killer Angel
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« on: November 11, 2007, 01:50:24 AM »
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For shooting sports with high shutter speeds or anything else with high shutter speeds,do you turn off the IS feature of your Canon 70-200 F2.8L IS lens or you just leave it on all the time?And why?
Thanks.
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francois
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« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2007, 03:25:15 AM »
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I leave it ON but switch to mode 2 (panning mode).
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Francois
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« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2007, 04:52:19 PM »
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Me too. I haven't noticed any negative effects from leaving it on.
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2007, 06:50:32 AM »
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If you're exposing for more than a second or so, it's better to turn off IS altogether. If you activate IS for several seconds while watching through the viewfinder, you see an initial "jump" when it first comes on, and then the image will slowly "wander" around. For long expusures this can result in more blur than if IS is off. But for anything faster than 1/5 or so, IS on will either reduce camera shake blur or at least not worsen it.
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BobShram
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« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2007, 05:32:22 PM »
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If you're exposing for more than a second or so, it's better to turn off IS altogether. If you activate IS for several seconds while watching through the viewfinder, you see an initial "jump" when it first comes on, and then the image will slowly "wander" around. For long expusures this can result in more blur than if IS is off. But for anything faster than 1/5 or so, IS on will either reduce camera shake blur or at least not worsen it.

Jonathan, is this a fact or an educated deduction from your experience, if fact is it documented some where? I ask because I have just started using a 600 with IS and have got some bad results of a few photos that I thought I was using all the correct methods, But I have been exposing for longer than 2 seconds which would make some sence. I will certanly be trying without IS to see how I fair. Following a bird using an extended run of say 12 exposures over 3 or 4 seconds does not seem to cause a problem with the IS running for this time though.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2007, 05:57:57 PM by BobShram » Logged
Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2007, 03:58:58 AM »
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I'ts easy to verify for yourself. Set the camera up on a tripod, turn IS on, look through the viewfinder, and half-press the shutter with a remote. You'll see the view in the finder slowly moving around. The magnitude is less than the typical handheld shake, but it is there.
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dennysb
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« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2007, 06:48:09 PM »
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I agree with jonathan,

However I seem to recalled that the "so called" second generation IS systems. Like the Canon 70-200L I.S did handle this correctly meaning that if you placed the lens on a tripod, you would be fine nevertheless.

On the other-hand 1st generation systems such as the 100-400L IS, which I also have do suffer significantly from this problem, and it is clearly documented that should turn off the I.S system.

Either way, it is clear that having the I.S on while having the camera on a good tripod is not beneficial, unless you find draining the batteries to be a good thing  


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I'ts easy to verify for yourself. Set the camera up on a tripod, turn IS on, look through the viewfinder, and half-press the shutter with a remote. You'll see the view in the finder slowly moving around. The magnitude is less than the typical handheld shake, but it is there.
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Dennys Bisogno

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« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2007, 08:19:36 PM »
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For shooting sports with high shutter speeds or anything else with high shutter speeds,do you turn off the IS feature of your Canon 70-200 F2.8L IS lens or you just leave it on all the time?And why?
Thanks.
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I almost always have mine off when shooting action. However I do not notice a big difference, if any, either way. I turn it off on the chance/assumption that it slows the autofocus.
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Pogo33
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2008, 05:00:10 PM »
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If you're exposing for more than a second or so, it's better to turn off IS altogether. If you activate IS for several seconds while watching through the viewfinder, you see an initial "jump" when it first comes on, and then the image will slowly "wander" around. For long expusures this can result in more blur than if IS is off. But for anything faster than 1/5 or so, IS on will either reduce camera shake blur or at least not worsen it.
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It is hard for me to express how big a deal this is. I was working with my new 1Ds Mark III with the EOS 24-105 and EOS 70-200 IS USM lenses with IS on at very show shutter speeds and was shocked at how many images were blurred from what I thought was camera shake. They were on a tripod and well tightened down. (Shot with mirror lock up and did not solve the blur.)  After a lot of testing and reading this post, I determined that virtually all of my image blur was the result of leaving my IS on with very slow shutter speeds. Further tests confirm this applies to the EOS 100-400 IS and the 300mm IS USM as well.  This is an important tip to pass along.

Earl
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2008, 05:50:16 PM »
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Either way, it is clear that having the I.S on while having the camera on a good tripod is not beneficial, unless you find draining the batteries to be a good thing 

Only if you're exposing for more than a second. In many instances, such as shooting in windy conditions on a tripod, IS is very beneficial. As long as your shutter speed is faster than about 1/4 second, IS is clearly beneficial, even on a tripod. It will reduce mirror slap, wind buffeting, etc...
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MikeMike
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« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2008, 05:53:25 PM »
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It is hard for me to express how big a deal this is. I was working with my new 1Ds Mark III with the EOS 24-105 and EOS 70-200 IS USM lenses with IS on at very show shutter speeds and was shocked at how many images were blurred from what I thought was camera shake. They were on a tripod and well tightened down. (Shot with mirror lock up and did not solve the blur.)  After a lot of testing and reading this post, I determined that virtually all of my image blur was the result of leaving my IS on with very slow shutter speeds. Further tests confirm this applies to the EOS 100-400 IS and the 300mm IS USM as well.  This is an important tip to pass along.

Earl
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It's clear in the manual, and common knowledge that you have to turn IS off when on tripod. The lens is going to seek for movement and in turn move itself.

Michael
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2008, 05:59:36 PM »
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It's clear in the manual, and common knowledge that you have to turn IS off when on tripod. The lens is going to seek for movement and in turn move itself.

Wrong. Not the 70-200. You are thinking of older lenses with older IS designs which couldn't handle being active on a tripod under any circumstances. The 70-200 behaves just fine with IS active on a tripod, as long as you don't expose for more than 1 second. I've got several thousand frames to back this up. What's the basis of your comment?
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MikeMike
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« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2008, 10:08:35 AM »
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Wrong..  I've got several thousand frames to back this up. What's the basis of your comment?
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... ONE HUNDRED MILLION FRAMES TO BACK THIS UPPPP


On the manual of my 24-105 it says to turn it off. Never read manual on my 70-200.

Good to know though! thanks

Michael
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2008, 10:33:44 AM »
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Never read manual on my 70-200.

Then perhaps you should save your smartass comments til after you've tried using the 70-200/2.8L IS on a tripod, or at least read the manual for it, or Chuck Westfall's (communications director for Canon USA) postings on the subject, which confirms that the lens will work fine on a triopod with IS active.
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sojournerphoto
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« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2008, 10:34:12 AM »
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... ONE HUNDRED MILLION FRAMES TO BACK THIS UPPPP
On the manual of my 24-105 it says to turn it off. Never read manual on my 70-200.

Good to know though! thanks

Michael
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I didn't recall that and will check my manual tonight, but if you are using later generation IS on a tripod I think you need to use a remote shutter release and hold the half press position for 0.5 to 1 second to allow the IS to detect that it is tripod mounted, before releasing the shutter.

Even in handheld use, I find it helps to give the IS time to 'settle' before releasing the shutter - then again I have slow hands. The other day I accidentally left my 5D on continuous shoot mode and fired 3 frames when I meant to take one:)
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jerryrock
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« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2008, 01:52:37 PM »
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Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM, from the manual page E-9:

"Set the STABILIZER switch to OFF when you are taking pictures with a tripod.

Even if the STABILIZER switch is set to ON, the IS function does not operate because the electronic circuits in the lens automatically detect that a tripod is being used. However, because electrical power is still being supplied to the image stabilizer unit, battery life is roughly 20% shorter than it would be with the switch set to OFF.

Set the STABILIZER switch to OFF when you are taking pictures using the Bulb setting (long exposures). If the STABILIZER switch is set to ON, the stabilizer function may introduce errors."

Jerry
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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2008, 03:25:33 PM »
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Haven't tested my 2.8 IS lately because I never use it, but there is a significant loss of detail shooting the f/4 IS on sticks with the IS on.
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2008, 03:35:47 PM »
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Even if the STABILIZER switch is set to ON, the IS function does not operate because the electronic circuits in the lens automatically detect that a tripod is being used. However, because electrical power is still being supplied to the image stabilizer unit, battery life is roughly 20% shorter than it would be with the switch set to OFF.

If you look up Chuck Westfall's posts on this subject, the 70-200/2.8L IS lens goes into a "tripod mode" when it detects that is is on a tripod. IS operates differently on a tripod, but is still active and will reduce wind vibration and mirror slap and other similar camera movements. Some copies of the lens' user manual contain incorrect information, such as the recommendation to turn off IS while tripod mounted. This was fixed at some point, but there are a lot of user manuals out there with incorrect information.

Chuck Westfall is a senior employee of Canon USA, and his posts match my extensive experience with the lens; that there is significant benefit to using IS on a tripod as long as exposure time is less than about 1 second.

But don't take my word for it, or Chuck's, test it for yourself.
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jerryrock
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« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2008, 06:45:53 PM »
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If you look up Chuck Westfall's posts on this subject, the 70-200/2.8L IS lens goes into a "tripod mode" when it detects that is is on a tripod. IS operates differently on a tripod, but is still active and will reduce wind vibration and mirror slap and other similar camera movements. Some copies of the lens' user manual contain incorrect information, such as the recommendation to turn off IS while tripod mounted. This was fixed at some point, but there are a lot of user manuals out there with incorrect information.

Chuck Westfall is a senior employee of Canon USA, and his posts match my extensive experience with the lens; that there is significant benefit to using IS on a tripod as long as exposure time is less than about 1 second.

But don't take my word for it, or Chuck's, test it for yourself.
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I actually did look up Chuck Westfall's recommendation and it is to turn off image stabilization on all but the "super-telephoto" lenses (300mm and up) when mounted on a tripod:

[a href=\"http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0612/tech-tips.html]http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0612/tech-tips.html[/url]

Jerry
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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2008, 07:37:10 PM »
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Then perhaps you should save your smartass comments til after you've tried using the 70-200/2.8L IS on a tripod
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Is it really necessary to get your panties in a bunch over me making an assumption about the IS system?

This sites for learning, and in learning comes mistakes and answers. I made a mistake, you answered, so thanks for that. But you need to learn some people skills

 
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