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Author Topic: Save as tiff in cs3  (Read 7393 times)
Wayne Fox
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« on: November 11, 2007, 10:46:36 PM »
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I recently read Jeff Schewe's discussion of PSD really being a dying format, and the use of tiff as a better option.

Having never used tiff's before, I would love some advice on which options are best, or which are best under certain circumstances if that applies.

Referring to the dialog box asking for things  such as image compression, layer compression, byte order.

Thanks
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2007, 12:31:45 AM »
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I'm working on a PC so my settings are LZW, Interleaved & IBM PC
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Marc McCalmont
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2007, 01:00:48 AM »
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I'm working on a PC so my settings are LZW, Interleaved & IBM PC
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=152063\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Actually, for 16 bit files, LZW will sometimes produce BIGGER files than uncompressed (and other tiff reader can barf on LZW).

I use zip compression with zip on layers as well. At this point in time Mac or PC isn't all that important and for Photoshop neither is the Pixel Order (but Interleaved is more standard). Zip compression can be a bit slower saving and opening but it produces the smalles file size even with 16 bit files.
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picnic
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« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2007, 06:27:58 AM »
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Actually, for 16 bit files, LZW will sometimes produce BIGGER files than uncompressed (and other tiff reader can barf on LZW).

I use zip compression with zip on layers as well. At this point in time Mac or PC isn't all that important and for Photoshop neither is the Pixel Order (but Interleaved is more standard). Zip compression can be a bit slower saving and opening but it produces the smalles file size even with 16 bit files.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=152067\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks for that.  I switched from psd to tiff after I read what you recommended and why---but I had wondered about the settings also (and probably should have asked here)--but now I at least have some good information.

Diane
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2007, 07:47:58 AM »
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Select interleaved if you want to use Qimage later.
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rdonson
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« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2007, 08:03:07 AM »
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Select interleaved if you want to use Qimage later.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=152102\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Select interleaved if you can.  CS3 doesn't always give you the option.  I haven't figured out the pattern yet but there are times when CS3 just figures out how it wants to save TIFFs and doesn't provide the options.  Its annoying as can be if you print from Qimage.
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Doug Fisher
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« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2007, 08:47:23 AM »
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>>I recently read Jeff Schewe's discussion of PSD really being a dying format<<

Wayne, can you please give a link to this discussion?

Thanks.
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jerryrock
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« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2007, 10:12:42 AM »
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The difference between TIFF and PSD formats is the fact that TIFF will not support duotones. There is really no reason to save in TIFF as opposed to PSD.  In fact, today you will find all of the major applications supporting PSD.  The trend in the Graphic Design/Publishing Industry is actually PDF which supports more features then any other file format currently available. When files containing type or vector layers are saved as PDF, these formats are retained; when saved as PSD or TIFF, they get rasterized when opened in the application.

Photoshop CS3 has an increased file size capability for the following file types:

PSD files: 2 GB
TIFF files: 4 GB

Note: Most applications cannot work with TIFF files larger than 2 GB.

PSB files: 4 Exabytes (4096 Petabytes, or 4 million Terabytes)
PDF files: 10 GB (pages are limited to a maximum size of 200 inches).
Note: Large Document Format files (.PSB) cannot be read by Photoshop 7.0.x or earlier.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2007, 01:43:07 PM by jerryrock » Logged

Gerald J Skrocki
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2007, 10:19:39 AM »
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Actually, for 16 bit files, LZW will sometimes produce BIGGER files than uncompressed (and other tiff reader can barf on LZW).

I use zip compression with zip on layers as well. At this point in time Mac or PC isn't all that important and for Photoshop neither is the Pixel Order (but Interleaved is more standard). Zip compression can be a bit slower saving and opening but it produces the smalles file size even with 16 bit files.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=152067\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Good to know.
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
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« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2007, 10:43:30 AM »
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Here's the link you may be looking for, Doug: Schewe/TIFF
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2007, 02:12:27 AM »
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Here's the link you may be looking for, Doug: Schewe/TIFF
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=152129\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yes, that's what I read.  Jeff has a pretty detailed explanation of the reasons if you read down aways.
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