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Author Topic: Corbis loses 12k pictures  (Read 5191 times)
Diapositivo
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« on: November 15, 2007, 12:46:52 PM »
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I think this is an interesting bit of news:

http://www.pdnonline.com/pdn/newswire/arti...t_id=1003670360

To sum it up, a photographer sued Corbis for not returning 12,640 out of the 50,822 images of him represented by Corbis.
The judge ruled in favour of the photographers as far as the number of lost pictures is concerned (that was contested by Corbis) there must still be a final quantification of the damages.

Corbis claimed that only 5,349 pictures at most were lost and among these only 6 of the pictures were actually sellable (were selected) and wanted to pay a refund only for the 6 ones and not for the other ones (the "outtakes").

The judged ruled that the amount is to be calculated based on the average annual revenues from Corbis pictures when the photographer was represented, considered for thirty years (which I guess does not certainly mean moltiplying the figure by 30, but applying a discounted cash flow algorithm).

Cheers
Fabrizio
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Rob C
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2007, 04:31:42 AM »
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Fabrizio, perhaps they sent the pics through an airport with low security parameters?

Ciao - Rob C
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Diapositivo
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« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2007, 04:24:03 PM »
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Fabrizio, perhaps they sent the pics through an airport with low security parameters?

Ciao - Rob C
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=153525\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I think in this case they needed no terrorist excuse to make a big mess...

Ciao
Fabrizio
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Rob C
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« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2007, 05:36:33 AM »
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Fabrizio

You were writing about tripods in another section of LuLa, and remarked about how they are forbidden in a variety of situations. As that section has now been closed, I´d like to take the tripod thing a little further here, where there´s a reasonable chance you might find this post.

I was working with a model some years ago who had worked with Patrick Lichfield - a lot of them had because of his calendar shoots, and it was always interesting to exchange anecdotes of other peoples´experiences together - when she mentioned having been with him in either Paris or Rome, I´m sorry, I really can´t remember which, and that the group had set up a tripod in the street and the police had closed them down because he had failed to get permission. Now, if he couldn´t get away with it, I don´t expect many of us can.

But the point is this: you CAN get permission if you go through the channels which we all know exist. I do not think it has anything to do with security at all; I think it has everything to do with making some money for the city and maximising all possible opportunities to do so.  If that were not the case, then few movies would ever get made!

Ciao - Rob C
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Diapositivo
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« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2007, 12:23:06 PM »
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Fabrizio



But the point is this: you CAN get permission if you go through the channels which we all know exist. I do not think it has anything to do with security at all; I think it has everything to do with making some money for the city and maximising all possible opportunities to do so.  If that were not the case, then few movies would ever get made!

Ciao - Rob C
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=154067\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

It's complicated.

There are at least two basic reasons why they don't want you to open a tripod in the road:

a) Security;
 Permission/taxes.

Certain local councils have exploited the opportunity the Law gives them to tax people if they want to take pictures with a tripod. Rome is among those places. It is as if the entire town was a museum. You want to take pictures? You pay.

You have to go to a specific local council office, compile a form whereby you state where, when, for how long and for which purpose are you going to take the pictures. They will charge you a very small amount (such as 10 euros) and away you go with your permission.

This is obviously something nobody does: how can I know how the light will be, where will I be etc. Most photographers do not plan that way. Also, you spend 10 euros but you will have wasted a morning just in getting the permission.

If it is a "vigile urbano" (local council policemen) to stop you, that will be for that reason.

A policemen (state policemen) normally would not care at all whether you have a permission or not, but the problem is, whereever you go in Rome, that is a sensible place.

If it is not a public office it is an embassy, an ambassador residence, an airline office, a judge house, a MP pied-à-terre, whatever. And - Jesus - policemen are just about everywhere when you don't need them!

I am going to buy one of those Manfrotto tripod with a fast-levelling head. When you shoot with a tripod "readiness is all". After one-two minutes you are taking pictures somebody will probably arrive.

Ciao
Fabrizio

PS Or you must really look like a tourist. Nobody bothers tourists, also if they have a tripod. That's the mystery of "security" behaviour. Just wear a Japanese mask...
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Rob C
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« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2007, 09:38:15 AM »
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Quote
It's complicated.

There are at least two basic reasons why they don't want you to open a tripod in the road:

a) Security;
 Permission/taxes.

Certain local councils have exploited the opportunity the Law gives them to tax people if they want to take pictures with a tripod. Rome is among those places. It is as if the entire town was a museum. You want to take pictures? You pay.

You have to go to a specific local council office, compile a form whereby you state where, when, for how long and for which purpose are you going to take the pictures. They will charge you a very small amount (such as 10 euros) and away you go with your permission.

This is obviously something nobody does: how can I know how the light will be, where will I be etc. Most photographers do not plan that way. Also, you spend 10 euros but you will have wasted a morning just in getting the permission.

If it is a "vigile urbano" (local council policemen) to stop you, that will be for that reason.

A policemen (state policemen) normally would not care at all whether you have a permission or not, but the problem is, whereever you go in Rome, that is a sensible place.

If it is not a public office it is an embassy, an ambassador residence, an airline office, a judge house, a MP pied-à-terre, whatever. And - Jesus - policemen are just about everywhere when you don't need them!

I am going to buy one of those Manfrotto tripod with a fast-levelling head. When you shoot with a tripod "readiness is all". After one-two minutes you are taking pictures somebody will probably arrive.

Ciao
Fabrizio

PS Or you must really look like a tourist. Nobody bothers tourists, also if they have a tripod. That's the mystery of "security" behaviour. Just wear a Japanese mask...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=155014\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


"Look like a tourist."

That, Fabrizio, should be easy for non-Romani; everybody else looks like they just bought their clothes out of a charity shop!

Ciao -Rob C
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