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Author Topic: Buying my first printer, epson 3800 or 2400  (Read 28288 times)
Mark D Segal
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« Reply #60 on: December 17, 2007, 10:22:50 PM »
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The prices of the two printers are very close after factoring in the $400+ of ink that comes with the 3800 as well as the current rebate.  The ink in the 3800 also seems to go further per ml.
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Yes, please see details in post #50 above. I'm not sure whether the 3800 uses less ink per sqmm of coverage, but it may. The key thing though is the economies of buying future ink cartridges for the 3800 as explained in the last paragraph of post  #50.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
billg71
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« Reply #61 on: December 18, 2007, 10:41:16 PM »
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I am more than grateful for your valuable input from all off you. After reading reviews and information sites on the 3800 and iPF5000. I think roll paper will be a more cost effective solution for me.
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Sunesha,

I'd suggest you check out the per-print cost of roll paper vs. sheet paper. I recently did and found out that sheets were less costly than roll, at least up to the 13" width my 2200 could accommodate.

I've recently added a 4800 and I've found there's a very distinct difference in the consumer-grade Epsons and the pro models. If you don't need the roll feeder for panoramas, I'd recommend the 3800. I've been very happy with my 2200 but it's definitely not the printer the 4800 is. I can't speak for the 2400 since I don't have one, but there's a world of difference in the 2200 v. the 4800 in print quality, speed and versatility.

I use the 2200 with MK inks for rag papers and I'm looking forward to upgrading to a 3800. Since rag papers aren't available on rolls, the lack of a roll feeder isn't a consideration. And the 17" width capability of the 3800 would be a definite bonus.

I've found that, all things considered, spending the money for pro-quality tools has been money well spent. I've been making my living with tools of one sort or the other for over 30 years now and have tried to economize when I could, only to find that I'd have been better off spending the extra money up front. Pro tools may cost a little more initially, but they do what you want when you want with no accommodations and/or fiddling around required on your part.

Of course, a lot of this depends on what you intend to do with the printer. If you typically print 10 prints a month, the 2400 is a no-brainer. If you print 10 prints a day, I'd recommend the 3800, unless you have a specific need for the roll feeder. In that case, I'd think you'd be better off with the 4800 or 4880.

As in a lot of questions on photo gear, it all boils down to "It Depends". What your requirements are,  how often you'll use the printer, how long you're willing to wait for a print, how much you're comfortable with paying for ink on a per/print basis,these are things you have to decide for yourself. Then you can evaluate what matters to you and what value you place on the different capabilities of the printers available in your chosen price range.

I'm sorry I can't say" Buy this one"  but there are just too  many personal requirements involved.

At the least, I hope this helps in some small part in making your decision,

Bill
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[span style='font-size:7pt;line-height:100%'][span style='color:blue']"The doctor told how he was once fishing in the Wind River area of Wyoming and he looked up and far above on the side of the canyon two dogs sat on a rock peeking at him from the brush that surrounded the rock. Only they weren't dogs, they were coyotes. They were curious about what he might be doing standing in a river waving a stick." [span style='color:black']Jim Harrison, Farmer[/span][/span][/span]
Sunesha
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« Reply #62 on: December 19, 2007, 01:16:17 PM »
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Sunesha,

I'd suggest you check out the per-print cost of roll paper vs. sheet paper. I recently did and found out that sheets were less costly than roll, at least up to the 13" width my 2200 could accommodate.

I've recently added a 4800 and I've found there's a very distinct difference in the consumer-grade Epsons and the pro models. If you don't need the roll feeder for panoramas, I'd recommend the 3800. I've been very happy with my 2200 but it's definitely not the printer the 4800 is. I can't speak for the 2400 since I don't have one, but there's a world of difference in the 2200 v. the 4800 in print quality, speed and versatility.

I use the 2200 with MK inks for rag papers and I'm looking forward to upgrading to a 3800. Since rag papers aren't available on rolls, the lack of a roll feeder isn't a consideration. And the 17" width capability of the 3800 would be a definite bonus.

I've found that, all things considered, spending the money for pro-quality tools has been money well spent. I've been making my living with tools of one sort or the other for over 30 years now and have tried to economize when I could, only to find that I'd have been better off spending the extra money up front. Pro tools may cost a little more initially, but they do what you want when you want with no accommodations and/or fiddling around required on your part.

Of course, a lot of this depends on what you intend to do with the printer. If you typically print 10 prints a month, the 2400 is a no-brainer. If you print 10 prints a day, I'd recommend the 3800, unless you have a specific need for the roll feeder. In that case, I'd think you'd be better off with the 4800 or 4880.

As in a lot of questions on photo gear, it all boils down to "It Depends". What your requirements are,  how often you'll use the printer, how long you're willing to wait for a print, how much you're comfortable with paying for ink on a per/print basis,these are things you have to decide for yourself. Then you can evaluate what matters to you and what value you place on the different capabilities of the printers available in your chosen price range.

I'm sorry I can't say" Buy this one"  but there are just too  many personal requirements involved.

At the least, I hope this helps in some small part in making your decision,

Bill
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Bill,

Thanks. I already have used R2400 on the desk. So you re-inforcing me that didnt make economic catastrophe made me happy  

Your information was most welcome. It is very hard to calculate the cost off printings I found out.

After leaving the first weeks off printing frenzy. I think I stop around 10 big 13inch prints and around 10 smaller A4 prints per month. I was in luck that I got the printer from a big comericial photo studio here in my local town that had pro-made profiles for around 20 papers. So I got alot off profiles which has worked just great.

I still hunting for a good 13inch roll paper for some off my panorama shoots, which is maybe one of twenty off my landscape shoots.

I think I move to bigger printer in a couple off years. But for now I happy with the smaller 2400. I only have test prints from 3800 and think 2400 is the same in print quality to my eyes.

Cheers,
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Daniel Sunebring, Malmoe, Sweden
Homepage: Sunesha.se
Non-native english speaker and dyslexian, so excuse my mistake in grammar and spelling."
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« Reply #63 on: December 19, 2007, 03:50:41 PM »
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Good evening,

My name is Daniel, a photo enthusiast not a pro. I been using a local printshop for doing my prints. Which has become a quite expensive and unpredictable experience. My main software for printing is Adobe Lightroom with Photoshop CS2(havnt afford the upgrade yet).

The thing that puzzle my choices is print cost. I understood after I bought "Camera to print", which was excellent instruction video to start understand photo printing. The gear showcased there was execellent.

The price difference between the 2400 and 3800 is quite large. Also when to account the paper cost printing A2 size paper it was a bit higher. But on the other hand I am appealed to the bigger prints and the cartridges seems to hold more ink. But I have hard time to count the cost diffrence?

Also havnt read a good review of 2400, had read couple off 3800. Most the reviews read about 2400 hasnt really got me understanding what the diffrence would be beetween this two.

Anyone can explain how you make a cost estimation?

I think I would print around 20-30 A3 prints a month. I have calibrated screen and understand that part of printing. But as landscape, architecture photo enthusiast. I am not really sure what I am gonna be pleased with. If money wasnt a issue I would go for 24 inch printer in a heartbeat.

Are there any option in the price range of 2400 and 3800 worth looking at also?

As framing photos do you think a 13 inch printer makes a large enough print for a landscape with forest detail? (has mostly done 24-30inch(something, not used to the inch system) )

Got good source for very cheap frames(Ikea) ;-) and love giving away prints to friends, often photos of landscapes or buildings that has a special meaning for them. Sorry for my lengthy post, but having problems to decide for myself and looking for people to push me to any direction.

CHeers,
Daniel
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Hi Daniel

Bear in mind that if you want to print really large you can always source those out to a photo lab.  But what would you be using the desktop for.  I think there are many advantages to getting the printer that will yield the largest size prints-that you can afford, of course-cause you'll never regret it later on.  I own a 2400 and I have to say that I'm sorely disappointed with the paper handling.  It isn't reliable in the way that it handles third party papers.  And sometimes it gives me trouble with Epson papers.  The K3 inks are fabulous.  I would really look in to the paper handling options between the two printers and ultimate image size.

Hopes this helps, good luck!
K
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billg71
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« Reply #64 on: December 20, 2007, 09:44:03 PM »
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......
I still hunting for a good 13inch roll paper for some off my panorama shoots, which is maybe one of twenty off my landscape shoots.

I think I move to bigger printer in a couple off years. But for now I happy with the smaller 2400. I only have test prints from 3800 and think 2400 is the same in print quality to my eyes.

Cheers,
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Daniel,

I don't know if it's available in Sweden, but I like Inkpress Luster for a general-purpose roll paper. It's a good quality paper, is very affordable, and prints well with the Epson Premium Luster profile. A drawback for me using the 2200 was that it comes on 3" core rolls, 50' long, which won't fit on the 2200. I don't know about the 2400, you need to check before you buy.

I also like the Ilford Gallerie Smooth Pearl , which comes in 2" core rolls 32' long. I think it gives you a better print than the Inkpress and it comes with its own profiles, but it's a little pricier. Fits on my 2200 with no problem and really looks good when printed on the 4800.

Both print very well with the K3 inks. I keep the Inkpress luster 8.5x11 in the 4800 for general use and proofing and use the Ilford rolls when I want a panorama print.

HTH,

Bill
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[span style='font-size:7pt;line-height:100%'][span style='color:blue']"The doctor told how he was once fishing in the Wind River area of Wyoming and he looked up and far above on the side of the canyon two dogs sat on a rock peeking at him from the brush that surrounded the rock. Only they weren't dogs, they were coyotes. They were curious about what he might be doing standing in a river waving a stick." [span style='color:black']Jim Harrison, Farmer[/span][/span][/span]
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