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Author Topic: Z3100 Service - clog message #80:01  (Read 2849 times)
Harris
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« on: November 20, 2007, 08:11:44 PM »
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When attempting to print on a 24" Z3100 machine it suddenly stops and I get a message that paper is cloged and I need to remove clog.  Nothing is present cloging the machine.  Only way to get machine to clear message is to turn off and then on but the same thing occurs.  Spent some time on phone with a service rep attempting to resolve problem without success and they are sending a tech rep out tomorrow to hopefully resolve the problem.

Questions

1 -Has anyone else have the same problem and if so, what was done to resolve it?

2- While I do not have any other problems, are there any suggestions of other issues I should have him/her investigate while present?

I will report back on results.

Thanks,

Harris
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Colorwave
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« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2007, 10:50:04 PM »
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Hmmm . . . the first part of the code, the 80 isn't in the service manual.  The second part, the 01 means that you should be able to take care of it (obviously with direction from tech support) as a user serviceable problem.  It says the code means Reseat/Reconnect/Clean/Adjust (manually).  The second pair of numbers begins with a 1 if it requires a technician.   If you have a technician headed your way you may wind up learning a new maintenance routine, assuming second part of the code is right.  Just out of curiosity, did they have you do anything beyond trying to reset the printer?
-Ron H.
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Harris
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2007, 09:09:03 PM »
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Ron,

I was wrong about the code - it was 81:01.  In any event, after much fustration and many calls to HP, a knowledgeable and pleasant service engineer made it to my studio - anout 4:30 PM today.  He initially put some oil on the bar on which the printer runs (showed me where it was dirty) but that did not help.  He ran a few diagnostic tests and we continued to have problems when whatever we attempted to print would stop about 2" from the end - there would be the same code 81:01.  He then wiped the bar clean (there was a lot of dirt or grease on it and oiled it again.  Still the same problem.

Then he noticed (with a flashlight) that the bar area where the print heads rested when it came to a stop were very dirty.  He initiated a print - pulled the plug while the head was running (an old trick I suggested from my Epson days) and was able to move the head freely along the bar.  Moved the head to the left - cleaned the entire bar (with rubbing alcohol I supplied) and oiled the entire bar.  

BTW, it is the same oil that was previously discussed on this forum.  He was suprised I did not get a maintenence kit along with the printer which would includes a small vial of the oil.

This cleared up the problem and I am now able to complete a print.  It was the dirt on the right end of the bar that caused the problem.

On you aside question, there was a few things they had me do while on the phone - one was to bring up a different menu on the LCD display by holding down the OK button, the top arrow, and the on button at the same time and releasing them when the on button stopped blinking.  At this point I do not remember what was on that menu, but if you try it, be sure to release the on button first.

That is my tale of woe - hope it is helpful to others - he told me the bar should be cleaned about every two months and then oiled.  Be sure you clean the entire bar.  

Meanwhile I was down for two days and lost two print jobs.      

If you have any other questions I will be glad to try and answer them.  

Happy Thanksgiving to all,

Harris    
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Colorwave
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« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2007, 01:13:16 AM »
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Sounds pretty odd, Harriis, since error 81 is paper advance, not a carriage problem.  If it took care of your problem I guess the error code was erroneous, and fixed is fixed.   If, however,  you develop problems again you might look here.

[attachment=3951:attachment]

On the subject of lubrification (I swear, that's what HP calls it), you would think that it would be a straightforward process for HP to inform its owners how to take care of their printers.  

Unfortunately, HP can't even seem to agree from one tech support person to the next as to the exact routine one should follow for lubrication.  Users are educating other users instead of HP leading the way themselves.  I'm afraid that HP thinks oil sounds messy and un-user friendly, so they try to softpedal the routine maintanence chores like oiling, wiping down the interior of the printer for overspray, and for me, at least, cleaning the printhead contacts for ink overspray as well.  

-Ron H.
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neil snape
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« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2007, 01:51:40 AM »
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Sounds pretty odd, Harriis, since error 81 is paper advance, not a carriage problem.  If it took care of your problem I guess the error code was erroneous, and fixed is fixed.   If, however,  you develop problems again you might look here.

[attachment=3951:attachment]

On the subject of lubrification (I swear, that's what HP calls it), you would think that it would be a straightforward process for HP to inform its owners how to take care of their printers. 

Unfortunately, HP can't even seem to agree from one tech support person to the next as to the exact routine one should follow for lubrication.  Users are educating other users instead of HP leading the way themselves.  I'm afraid that HP thinks oil sounds messy and un-user friendly, so they try to softpedal the routine maintanence chores like oiling, wiping down the interior of the printer for overspray, and for me, at least, cleaning the printhead contacts for ink overspray as well. 

-Ron H.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=154877\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
There may be two problems then that need to be documented for Z users, (well all the series then of LFPs with the same chassis).

If the slightest bit of dirt affects the return of the carriage then they will have to take care to put up full instructions on how to do so, and offer an easily accessible lube kit for a moderate price.

BTW if the carriage cannot return then indeed it will block paper advance.

Second will be the build up of ink in the end areas, and in the ink wells which are going to reduce the conductivity of the contacts. I can imagine this will be a simple cleaning procedure, but it would be better if an official procedure was documented.

Where as CAD printers rarely use rag or media where lint is going to wind up in the cavity, photo printers do and will. Users will be happy to do regular maintenance, but they need concise instructions on how to do so.

PS Ron do you have a repair guide?
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Colorwave
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« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2007, 02:06:23 AM »
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PS Ron do you have a repair guide?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=154878\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Ummm . . . why, yes, I do, Neil.  Another user was kind enough to upload a PDF version to my FTP site.  I'm rather unsure of its provenance, or at least the route it followed from HP to me.
-Ron H.
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SeanPuckett
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« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2007, 08:18:08 AM »
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I would like to have a copy of that service manual.

N.B. a couple weeks ago I pulled all the printheads after seeing a few lines in a profiling target to discover overspray on the contacts and printheads themselves.  Wiped them off with water and looked for globs inside the machine to clean up, found a few here and there.  Reseated everything, ran a printhead alignment, and the problem is gone.  Yesterday I vacuumed the machine with a crevice tool to pull any misc lint out.  Next time I'll take a look at the bars.

HP definitely needs to come forward with a "user maintenance" document that covers things like this.  I think we can all accept that the printer will need a little TLC occasionally, and having some kind of user document on how to do this stuff properly and effectively would be appreciated.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2007, 08:25:26 AM by SeanPuckett » Logged

rdonson
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« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2007, 09:13:01 AM »
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I would like to have a copy of that service manual.

N.B. a couple weeks ago I pulled all the printheads after seeing a few lines in a profiling target to discover overspray on the contacts and printheads themselves.  Wiped them off with water and looked for globs inside the machine to clean up, found a few here and there.  Reseated everything, ran a printhead alignment, and the problem is gone.  Yesterday I vacuumed the machine with a crevice tool to pull any misc lint out.  Next time I'll take a look at the bars.

HP definitely needs to come forward with a "user maintenance" document that covers things like this.  I think we can all accept that the printer will need a little TLC occasionally, and having some kind of user document on how to do this stuff properly and effectively would be appreciated.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=154945\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

It would be nice to make the service manual available to all via the z3100 wiki
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[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
Ron[/span][/span][/span][/span]
neil snape
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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2007, 09:19:46 AM »
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It would be nice to make the service manual available to all via the z3100 wiki
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=154961\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
In theory that would be good, but I know for fact that HP wouldn't want it on a public site....

that said it's pretty easy to find Epson LFP service manuals!
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Harris
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« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2007, 10:25:30 AM »
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BTW, I learned how to keep the printer operating with the cover up.  When the cover is lifted, on the upper right side there is a plastic part that sticks out of the cover and fits into a hole when closed in which there is a switch.  Just by placing something in the hole - piece of cardboard, etc, will allow machine to operate.

[span style=\'font-size:14pt;line-height:100%\']This is not a recomendation[/span] - possible for something to fall in while machine operating and get caught - like a finger or a necktie.

Harris
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