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Author Topic: Printing on fine fabric  (Read 11636 times)
jule
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« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2007, 02:47:53 PM »
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If one is looking for a more transparent media, the Haboti 5mm is fantastic, and has a ghostly appearance, especially when backlit. We often use it in a layered, sculptural context. It even shimmers more, adding to the illusion.  A cotton gause they make is very thin and transparent and I've used it with an acetate mirror behind it or, layered, for a totally unique illusionary effect. This is what I love about alternative media like this, it has a physical presence.

john
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John, Do you have a link to some of your work? I am myself exploring the expression of my photography in a sculptural way, and would love to see what you are doing.

Julie
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deanwork
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« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2007, 03:26:22 PM »
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Hi Julie,

Most of the things I've done on silk for clients are not on my webstie but you will find several things there. For the transparency effect, done on 5mm Haboti look at the Greek faces installation. Some of them are on Haboti and some are on Dupion, and some on linen. The kimonos we did a few years ago combine many different images printed on different fabrics and sewn together. We did about 7 totally different variations on those. I also did some room dividers for someone in Philly that are not on there. The linen or thicker Haboti is great for that. If I were you I would start out with a sample of one of the Haboti silks. I am by no means a "fabric printer", but I do like working with all kinds of media.

http://www.deanimaging.com/galleryview.php?cat=3&selected=0


John





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John, Do you have a link to some of your work? I am myself exploring the expression of my photography in a sculptural way, and would love to see what you are doing.

Julie
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rdonson
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« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2007, 03:52:36 PM »
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A fascinating website, John.  I also enjoyed looking at your personal work.  Thanks for sharing your experiences and recommendations with the various fabrics.
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[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
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kwbpics
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« Reply #23 on: December 30, 2007, 08:28:10 AM »
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For my next exhibition I would like to print on to a fabric which can be seen through - much like looking outside through a sheer curtain.

I have an Epson 9800 and was hoping someone with some experience in this regard could point me in the right direction.

I have found a couple of products, with quite varying prices, and haven't seen any samples, so would love some feedback if anyone has printed on sheer fabric.

Thanks,
Julie
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Hi. Great Product--Olana Digital Fine Art Fabric (340 GSM) from Digital Art Supplies, Also, try Dharma Trading Co. Hundreds of fabrics here. I have used both companies products. Fast, efficient and great prices.  kwbpics@yahoo.ca
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Kevin Beer
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Elena
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« Reply #24 on: April 19, 2008, 07:33:11 PM »
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Hello,
i have Epson 9800 and i wanted to print on cotton fabric, canvas for example. Can it be done? I checked all the websited offered in this thread... but my question is can i use fabric without any treatment for printing?
thank you
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kwbpics
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« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2008, 08:21:36 PM »
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Hello,
i have Epson 9800 and i wanted to print on cotton fabric, canvas for example. Can it be done? I checked all the websited offered in this thread... but my question is can i use fabric without any treatment for printing?
thank you
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=190701\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
 Hi. see Digital Art Supplies - Olana Fabric- already treated. Also Dharma Trading Company,(both on the net) has hundreds of treated and untreated fabrics. I use Inkaid products to prepare untreated fabric and paper etc. You can even print on birch bark with Inkaid. Many canvas products are already precoated and profiles available for these from the suppliers.
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Kevin Beer
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na goodman
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« Reply #26 on: April 20, 2008, 05:18:29 PM »
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I've seen plenty of shops with that kind of fabric in windows as displays and someone is certainly printing on it.  I just haven't found a fabric of this nature yet to trust in my HP Z3100 although I'm interested.

I have been looking at some other fabric although its not sheer.  Pabric  I'm considering ordering their samplers to see what its like.
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You may want to try this place: [a href=\"http://www.colortextiles.com/cat_rolls.html]http://www.colortextiles.com/cat_rolls.html[/url]
They have rolls and the owner is very familiar with Epson printers and the wide format Epson's
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Elena
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« Reply #27 on: April 21, 2008, 09:10:43 PM »
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Hi. see Digital Art Supplies - Olana Fabric- already treated. Also Dharma Trading Company,(both on the net) has hundreds of treated and untreated fabrics. I use Inkaid products to prepare untreated fabric and paper etc. You can even print on birch bark with Inkaid. Many canvas products are already precoated and profiles available for these from the suppliers.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=190705\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Hi, thank you for all replies.
i will contact Dharma about treated fabric.
i will also try InkAID.
thank you
Elena
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kdphotography
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« Reply #28 on: April 21, 2008, 09:35:02 PM »
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I found a very unique---actually quite incredible textile type fabric media for inkjet printing.  It is very translucent and uses a backer to feed through the printer.  It is expensive.

BUT before I can make any recommendations, I'm waiting to hear back from the manufacturer and distributor.

I received a "bad" roll of media---and it is very apparent that the media was damaged "at the factory."  The box was in perfect condition, and also has a very unique core system that prevents damage----the media cannot touch the box walls.  I did not realize that the media had a "ding" running the length of the 36" roll, which actually separated the media from the backer.  At least 25% of this expensive media roll is damaged.

Result?  Adhesive in the head-----a visit from Epson and a replaced printer head.  I made sure that the Epson tech examined the media roll.  Yup---took photos too.  

I want to see how the distributor and manufacturer handle "quality control" before making any recommendations.  To be sure, it is a most unique media for both Canon and Epson, but I would hate to see someone go through what I did with my printer and studio being at a standstill for a week +.
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deanwork
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« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2008, 08:11:19 AM »
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I've been using the Jacquared inkjet coated fabrics for about 8 years now and I've never run into any quality control issues or variation at all. Of course since the natural fiibers are natural there are some variation in the way the silk is created. Blame the worms for that. Occasionally UPS will destroy a box in shipping, so I've learned to not use UPS here in Atlanta for anything of value.

After all this time the one thing that I've learned that really has helped me is that with printing color or black and white out of the Epson driver, if you add about +15% to the total ink limit in the driver before making your profile you will REALLY see a quality improvement, both in regard to color gamut but also dmax. It is very significant. Of course if you are printing with a great rip like Studio Print, you have even more control over individual ink limits. I get nice results from Ultrachrome and amazing results with Con's NK7 carbon pigments on these materials. With color you can add to the permanece by spraying with a uv spray like Premier Art that seals out all the pollutants in the air.

Anyone who is interested in an amazing translucent material should check out the 5mm Haboti. It is really shimmering and ghostly and can be laid on top of other imagery if desired. The 16mm Haboti is a great tough all around silk. You can order "sample" 42" x6' rolls of any of their offerings for about $25.00 I believe. That is the best bang for the buck.

Why in the world they don't offer 44" rolls is beyond me. I've been pleading for years.

john






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I found a very unique---actually quite incredible textile type fabric media for inkjet printing.  It is very translucent and uses a backer to feed through the printer.  It is expensive.

BUT before I can make any recommendations, I'm waiting to hear back from the manufacturer and distributor.

I received a "bad" roll of media---and it is very apparent that the media was damaged "at the factory."  The box was in perfect condition, and also has a very unique core system that prevents damage----the media cannot touch the box walls.  I did not realize that the media had a "ding" running the length of the 36" roll, which actually separated the media from the backer.  At least 25% of this expensive media roll is damaged.

Result?  Adhesive in the head-----a visit from Epson and a replaced printer head.  I made sure that the Epson tech examined the media roll.  Yup---took photos too. 

I want to see how the distributor and manufacturer handle "quality control" before making any recommendations.  To be sure, it is a most unique media for both Canon and Epson, but I would hate to see someone go through what I did with my printer and studio being at a standstill for a week +.
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Margaret
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« Reply #30 on: February 12, 2009, 09:20:48 PM »
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I was so happy to find this thread.  Like Julie (a year ago) I am thinking about how best to print high quality photographic images on fabric for use in  fiber art.  
I've been wading through threads by crafters and quilters for years on the subject but this is the thread that really comes the closest to what I am trying to figure out how to do in terms of leveraging the new wide gamut, archival pigment inks.
Does anyone have any experience running roles of cotton or linen through a z3200?  

I am on the fence between getting a z3200 or an Epson 900 series.   According to what I am reading in formus on this site and others, the epson 900 series has a very robust feed system.  But they might still have issues with head clogging.  The z3200 has a less robust feed system but no significant head clogging issues.

Margee
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Miles
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« Reply #31 on: February 12, 2009, 09:41:37 PM »
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I have printed a panoramic on LexJet Water Resistant Satin Cloth using a Z3100 and have been pleased with the results, producing a 24" x 96" banner.  I use this as a table wrap for summer art shows and have received quite a few comments on it, although contrast is lowered compared to what would be expected when printed on good media.  When held up to a window and backlit, images printed on this cloth really pop.  I am satisfied with it, but I also kept my expectations in line with the media.
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marcsitkin
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« Reply #32 on: February 13, 2009, 12:24:10 PM »
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Try the 3p line of fabrics. Lexjet carry's them. They have types that work with solvent and aqueous printers. Another option is to farm the work out to someone with a dye sub shop. Dye subs will give you the richest colors if that's what you need.
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Regards,

Marc Sitkin
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pherold
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« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2009, 06:38:42 PM »
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I'm coming at this topic from the profiling end of things, rather than the printing.  We have profiled many fabrics including canvas, linens, polyester, etc.  Since this media often does not have the dmax that you expect from finer papers, you tend to expect less from it.  

However, we have found that by measuring the profiling target with a polarizing filter, we can draw out a lot of the shadow detail that would otherwise be lost.  If you're profiling yourself or having someone else make a profile for your fabric, see if you can use a spectrophotometer that has a polarizing filter.
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Margaret
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« Reply #34 on: February 13, 2009, 07:14:42 PM »
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Quote from: Miles
I have printed a panoramic on LexJet Water Resistant Satin Cloth using a Z3100 and have been pleased with the results, producing a 24" x 96" banner.  I use this as a table wrap for summer art shows and have received quite a few comments on it, although contrast is lowered compared to what would be expected when printed on good media.  When held up to a window and backlit, images printed on this cloth really pop.  I am satisfied with it, but I also kept my expectations in line with the media.

Miles, thank you for this.  It doesn't sound like you had issues with feeding fabric through the feed system on the z3100 which is good news to me.
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Margaret
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« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2009, 07:18:27 PM »
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Quote from: marcsitkin
Try the 3p line of fabrics. Lexjet carry's them. They have types that work with solvent and aqueous printers. Another option is to farm the work out to someone with a dye sub shop. Dye subs will give you the richest colors if that's what you need.

Thank you for this info, Marc.  I would love to be able to print the stuff myself.  So I guess I'll give Lexjet's 3p line a look see.  It sounds like part of the issue is going to be getting a good profile.

Margaret
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Margaret
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« Reply #36 on: February 13, 2009, 07:31:01 PM »
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Quote from: pherold
I'm coming at this topic from the profiling end of things, rather than the printing.  We have profiled many fabrics including canvas, linens, polyester, etc.  Since this media often does not have the dmax that you expect from finer papers, you tend to expect less from it.  

However, we have found that by measuring the profiling target with a polarizing filter, we can draw out a lot of the shadow detail that would otherwise be lost.  If you're profiling yourself or having someone else make a profile for your fabric, see if you can use a spectrophotometer that has a polarizing filter.


Patrick,  the profiling end of things is interesting to me.  

A polarizing filter huh?  I have an i1 specrophotometer with which I routinely create paper profiles using the i1 match software.  It came with the package for photographers that GretagMacbeth was selling back in 2006 .  Do you think I could get a polarizing filter for this spectrophotometer?  If not, what spectrophotometers have polarizing filters available?

Also, do you have any experience or additional advise for printing / reading targets with an HP 3200 using it's own specrophotometer?

Thank you,

Margaret
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Miles
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« Reply #37 on: February 13, 2009, 07:46:37 PM »
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Miles, thank you for this.  It doesn't sound like you had issues with feeding fabric through the feed system on the z3100 which is good news to me.

I have not had any feeding issues at all with this fabric.  Just keep in mind I have only printed a handful of times using the fabric.  Good Luck!
« Last Edit: February 13, 2009, 07:49:27 PM by Miles » Logged
pherold
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« Reply #38 on: February 16, 2009, 12:33:00 PM »
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Hi Margaret,
Unfortunately none of those spectrophotometers have the ability to add a polarizing filter.  The last spectro I know of to have that ability is the SpectroScan table that was made by GretagMacbeth, and Xrite stopped making those over a year ago.  That's what we use.  You might be able to find them second hand if you want to do this yourself.  The i1 Pro and the Xrite spectro that's built into the HP are both quite good with more normal media;  it's just that we have found that we can squeak out some more shadow detail with the SpectroScan when working with matte finishes or uneven surfaces like fabric.  

It makes a lot of sense actually - trying to read a color off a bumpy fabric surface when the light bounces off of it in all directions, tends to make the measurement somewhat washed out.  It's reading a lot of the light bouncing off the uneven surface, rather than actually measuring the color.  The polarizing filter only allows light from one direction to pass through the filter, there's less scattering of light.  This makes the measurement a lot slower, but also seems to be of better quality.
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Margaret
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« Reply #39 on: February 16, 2009, 12:48:54 PM »
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Quote from: pherold
Hi Margaret,
Unfortunately none of those spectrophotometers have the ability to add a polarizing filter.  The last spectro I know of to have that ability is the SpectroScan table that was made by GretagMacbeth, and Xrite stopped making those over a year ago.  That's what we use.  You might be able to find them second hand if you want to do this yourself.  The i1 Pro and the Xrite spectro that's built into the HP are both quite good with more normal media;  it's just that we have found that we can squeak out some more shadow detail with the SpectroScan when working with matte finishes or uneven surfaces like fabric.  

It makes a lot of sense actually - trying to read a color off a bumpy fabric surface when the light bounces off of it in all directions, tends to make the measurement somewhat washed out.  It's reading a lot of the light bouncing off the uneven surface, rather than actually measuring the color.  The polarizing filter only allows light from one direction to pass through the filter, there's less scattering of light.  This makes the measurement a lot slower, but also seems to be of better quality.

Hi Patrick,

Thanks for this follow-up.  Your elaboration makes it very clear why a polarizing filter would help.  The only other suggestion for profiling fabric I've heard is to up the "ink limit" when printing the target.

Margaret
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