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Author Topic: Color Burst VS Image Print  (Read 5845 times)
tad
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« on: December 05, 2007, 01:00:23 PM »
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Bought 3800 that comes with colorburst. Image Print is offering reduced price for epson owners. Curious as what/if people use or have a preference for.
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tad
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« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2007, 05:47:06 PM »
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Bought 3800 that comes with colorburst. Image Print is offering reduced price for epson owners. Curious as what/if people use or have a preference for.
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Somebody has to have a comment.
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canlogic
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« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2007, 05:57:19 PM »
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Can only comment that I have and use Imageprint with my 4000 and it is really excellent. Just got a 7880 and the upgrade was just too much so I will use my own profiles.
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1dmkIII, some lenses, Epson 7880, iMac, Leica M8, other stuff
TMcCulley
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« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2007, 05:58:50 PM »
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Do you have the video "From Camera to Print"  Jeff and Micheal have an extended discussion about these two RIPs.  Sorry I do not use either.

Tom
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Schewe
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« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2007, 06:05:16 PM »
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Somebody has to have a comment.
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Unless you bought the ColorBurst rip to do CMYK and proofing, then you pretty much wasted your money because that's what ColorBurst is designed for (and it does that really, really well).

The need for ImagePrint for getting really good color & B&W out of EPson printers pretty much went away with the 800 series printers. ImagePrint still has some good workflow benefits but I prefer to print out of Lightroom using custom profiles where I get workflow benefits as well as excellent color (now that Leopard drivers have been released as beta).
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mikeseb
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« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2007, 06:41:58 PM »
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Jeff's thoughts mirror my own.

I print via Image Print on my 4000, and I think a RIP is essential in order to get the best quality from this printer; even more so now that I have upgraded to Leopard and there is only limited driver support in Leopard for the 4000. ImagePrint supplants the epson drivers with proprietary (I'd say, much better) ones, bypassing the problem.

I have used IP's workflow features some in the past during high-volume work situations, but not so much any more. Most of my work is fine-art, one-at-a-time stuff so I can afford to go slowly!  For me, therefore, IP serves as a pricy third-party printer-driver upgrade. That said, what it does, it does extremely well. Great B&W was my original goal in buying IP, and it delivers in spades.

I'm hoping to move to at least a 24-inch printer in 2008, probably the HPZ3100, unless Epson makes a comparable printer that allows simultaneous installation of both photo- and matte-black ink cartridges. The 4000 will get sold or used with a specialty B&W inkset. I do not foresee buying ImagePrint for a new printer, given the prohibitive cost and the excellence of the latest drivers for those machines.

I doubt I'd buy it if I were purchasing the 3800, from what I know of that printer.
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michael sebastian
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rdonson
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« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2007, 06:57:40 PM »
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... but I prefer to print out of Lightroom using custom profiles where I get workflow benefits as well as excellent color (now that Leopard drivers have been released as beta).
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Jeff,

Just curious about printing from Lightroom.  I understand the workflow benefits and some of the other nice aspects of LR printing but how do you get along without softproofing?  Do you restrict your printing to glossy or satin papers?
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[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
Ron[/span][/span][/span][/span]
Marty C
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« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2007, 07:40:43 PM »
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Jeff,

Just curious about printing from Lightroom.  I understand the workflow benefits and some of the other nice aspects of LR printing but how do you get along without softproofing?  Do you restrict your printing to glossy or satin papers?
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Jeff is a beta tester for Adobe so he is probaly using a version of Lightroom that can softproof. He can not admit to it do to NDA but I would not bet against it.  
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canlogic
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« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2007, 08:14:11 PM »
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And probably has Photokit sharpener in it as well as a big supply of Exhibition fiber paper.
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Schewe
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« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2007, 12:34:23 AM »
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Just curious about printing from Lightroom.  I understand the workflow benefits and some of the other nice aspects of LR printing but how do you get along without softproofing?
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I render important images into Photoshop for further image editing (such as local tone/color) and do softproofing and final output sharpening in Photoshop, then save the image and print from Lightroom...
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rdonson
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« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2007, 08:26:04 AM »
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I render important images into Photoshop for further image editing (such as local tone/color) and do softproofing and final output sharpening in Photoshop, then save the image and print from Lightroom...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=160804\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Thanks, Jeff.

I just noticed that you'll be teaching this at Photoshop World in Orlando.

One of the real and tangible benefits to Adobe Photoshop Lightroom is the new and efficient way of printing digital images. But, while Lightroom can do a lot for your images, sometimes you still need Photoshop, particularly for local tone and color correction as well as Photoshop Soft Proofing. This Session, by Jeff Schewe (one of the original pre-alpha testers of Lightroom), will answer the burning question "When do you use Lightroom and when do you use Photoshop?" when the final result is a digital print. This will be an in-depth look at Lightroom to Photoshop to Lightroom for printing.

Instructor: Jeff Schewe
Track: Photoshop® Lightroom® Track
« Last Edit: December 16, 2007, 05:25:50 PM by rdonson » Logged

[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
Ron[/span][/span][/span][/span]
Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2007, 02:12:46 PM »
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I render important images into Photoshop for further image editing (such as local tone/color) and do softproofing and final output sharpening in Photoshop, then save the image and print from Lightroom...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=160804\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
And I'll bet he has by now a pretty good sense of how soft proofing will look, so he can get close enough for the less important images without leaving Lightroom.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
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