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Author Topic: Olympus E-3  (Read 114417 times)
Ray
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« Reply #180 on: January 28, 2008, 08:41:58 AM »
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I had met a very respected photographer from a well known community college who had also tried out the Olympus E-3 and 12-60 lens and subsequently purchased it. He sat down and showed us his photos from his recent trip across Spain with it and I can only say they were wonderful, if not breathtaking. I was especially impressed with the way the camera handled shadows in alley ways and in architectural details. And he is very pleased with the system.
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Nick Devlin, in a review on this site, has also produced some remarkable shots with his G9 recently in Japan. Obviously there are many competent photographers who have produced stunning results with all sorts of equipment.

Most photography enthusiasts already have equipment. Decisions to upgrade, or buy into another system, can be based on anything you like. Quentin apparently bought his E-3 on a whim. I imagine others would buy an E-3 because it's simply an excellent all-round camera which is very portable. Some might be duped by the fact that all Zuiko lenses really are very sharp, not realising that they have to be at least twice as sharp as the equivalent 35mm lens in order to produce the same results as FF 35mm with the same number of pixels. Others want to know just precisely what advantages relating to image quality an E-3 might have compared with their existing equipment. I'm one of those.

I'm intrigued by the 2 stop DoF advantage of the E-3 system. I think it's possible that a good Zuiko lens could deliver sharper results at f5.6, with the 10MP sensor of the E-3, than a 35mm lens at F11 on the 5D, even if the reason is only due to the opportunity to use a faster shutter speed because of the wider aperture.

However, I'm doubtful that f11 on a good 35mm lens would be less diffraction limited than a good Zuiko lens at f5.6. Or to put it another way, I'm doubtful that a Zuiko lens would have less significant aberrations at f5.6 than a 35mm lens at f11. Likewise comparing Zuiko f4 with 35mm f8 and Zuiko f2 with 35mm f4.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2008, 09:54:12 AM by Ray » Logged
Quentin
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« Reply #181 on: January 28, 2008, 08:58:13 AM »
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Quentin, I saw your remark about the ZD. I have been doing some shooting with the new 645ZD and found it superb. I even managed a magazine cover with it. I'll get to doing a story of my experience with it on blog this week.
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Great, I'll check it out when it's up  

Quentin
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Quentin Bargate, ARPS, Author, photographer entrepreneur and senior partner of Bargate Murray, Law Firm of the Year 2013
jake21
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« Reply #182 on: January 28, 2008, 10:44:11 AM »
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I haven't seen those reports but I really don't go looking for them. I can only tell you about my experience with it and what I just saw.
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I've seen those reports and for the most part it is related to the auto-gradation feature. If the dynamic range is too large then noise will occur in the shadows. This is also true of the sony a700. if you read the dpreview on the sony A700 they give a very detail explanation as to why this happens and it makes perfect sense that this would happen with the e-3. The solution is simple:

a) Do not expect miracles
 If the dynamic range is very very large do not use auto (also do not use auto at night)
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