Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Archiving/backup solution  (Read 6564 times)
geotzo
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 229


WWW
« on: December 15, 2007, 11:45:16 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi all,
I am one of those messy photographers who has a few thousand images all over the place (i.e. Hds DVDs), who is now trying to get everything in order and start archiving and backing up properly. What I am looking for is a total solution for my workflow, meaning some software that will let me archive and backup photos after shooting and retouching. I have tried to keep all my files in two extermal Hard drives plus DVDs for extra security. But I can't really tell where is what in this chaos of folders and subfolders I ve created  . It has been probably discussed before but I would like your advice on what combination of software should I use for backing up without loosing track on either HDs or DVDs while doing it differenciatially (i think it is called that). What are you using? Any books or on-line tutorials on this?
Many thanks for any help provited.
George
Logged
Farkled
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 97


« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2007, 12:30:36 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm far from being an expert so will relay only what works for me.  The problem breaks down into at least two domains:  Organization and Backup.  

The simplest is backup.  There are a plethora of backup and copy programs which can be automated and scheduled so that you need remember to do more than periodically check that they are still working.  I use two:  SecondCopy and AISBackup.  Why Two?  for the same reason that you use two disks - the same gremlin probably won't get both.  I use SecondCopy to back up specific folders to various media during the course of the day (it's optimized for this) and AISBackup to do daily and weekly global backups.  Both are shareware and of minimal cost.

Organization is a much more touchy/feely beast.  Generally, the number of opinions on the best way to organize is equal to about 1.5 times the number of people discussing it.  I use subject oriented folders and the occasional keyword for the moment.  I've discovered that the optimal organization evolves over time so that one's software needs to be very flexible.  For example, I've just added RAW files to the mix so now I've got the whole problem of RAWS, Backup RAWS, edited TIFFs or PSDs and JPGs used for uploads and mailings in addition to the original, in-process, and finished (editing) states folders.

Dates don't work for me because much comes through my scanner and the dates have little to do with actual image dates which are usually about 30 - 60 years prior.  Subject works until something fits in multiple categories.  I don't have clients or job numbers so that all escapes my view.  I use ThumbsPlus as my organizer.  I find Bridge to be not quickly flexible - change your mind on category names and groupings and you might as well start over.  Have no experience with Lightroom or Aperture but many like them.

Lastly, I'll suggest that you migrate your DVDs to USB drives and use DVD as your last ditch medium.  You can grab a 1 TB USB drive and run with it in a matter of seconds.  DVDs fail often and easily and are not suited to automated backups.  It's coming up on that once a year that I burn a spindle of DVDs to leave at someone's house
Logged
geotzo
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 229


WWW
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2007, 01:52:09 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for the reply,
I m actually thinking on what you said about not using any DVDs at all. I m very aware that they are not very stable, but never thought not using any at all. That really sounds good because I can just use an extra HD, which will also be much easier than DVDs, much quicker and easier to track files and do backups. Hmm I think I ll do that. One can do multiple copies of photos in Lightroom which is nice. I m looking at the programs you mentioned and also found another called "Photo backup". Archives might be easier to do in Lightroom, but cannot be sure because I m still on the learning curve with it.
George
Logged
nicolaasdb
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 213


WWW
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2007, 03:32:37 AM »
ReplyReply

forget about DVD's. I tried this and it just doesn't work. Burning 60 gigs to DVD after a job....is not going to happen!!

What I did after my external LaCie drives disaster (they are expensive and crash constantly!) I purchased a 12 bay enclosure and 12 WD 750GB HD's

I am not using it as a raid but as 12 different drives.

I named the drives and started dragging the different project to the different drives (commercial, editorial 1, personal projects etc). I am messy as you and just give the folder the name of the job, so I can always find my stuff with the "spotlight" function on my MAC.

I also catalogued most of the drives with mediapro this makes it easier to work with a large amount of images...but the mediapro software is not very stable and crashes a lot...which means that you constantly have to safe if you are working on a project..or you lose all your edits.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2007, 03:36:14 AM by nicolaasdb » Logged
roberte
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4


WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2008, 11:39:44 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi George,

Archiving doesn't need to be complicated or expensive. You just need to establish and maintain a set of protocols. My suggestion is to automate as much as possible, and have two backups with one off site (and preferably one read-only). Whatever digital system you settle on expect it to change - often. You need a simple, scalable solution that doesn't lock you into any particular brand of operating system, software, or hardware vendor.

For books on DAM there are two I can recommend:

The DAM Book by Peter Krogh and Digital Photographer's Guide to Media Management by Tim Grey.

Peter's is the source most often referred to, and Tim's is a lighter read with some different view points. With both books look at the underlying ideas rather than how the featured applications work.

-- Robert.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad