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Author Topic: Mac OS equivalent to Archive Creator  (Read 2752 times)
X-Re
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« on: December 18, 2007, 11:26:30 AM »
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I've been using Archive Creator on the PC to back up to optical media for long term storage. I realize that cheap disk seems to be the preferred medium of choice for backups, these days, but my paranoid side demands a 2nd option

Is there a rough approximate of the Archive Creator functionality for Mac?? ie, ability to gracefully handle backups that span multiple media, generate an index for the backup set, etc??
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sergio
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« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2007, 06:09:59 PM »
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Why don't you consider using a database app such as Portfolio or Iview? Images can be referenced in DVDs and HDs.
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jerryrock
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« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2007, 06:43:21 PM »
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I've been using Archive Creator on the PC to back up to optical media for long term storage. I realize that cheap disk seems to be the preferred medium of choice for backups, these days, but my paranoid side demands a 2nd option

Is there a rough approximate of the Archive Creator functionality for Mac?? ie, ability to gracefully handle backups that span multiple media, generate an index for the backup set, etc??
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=161469\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Roxio Toast Titanium.
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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2007, 02:14:18 AM »
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I wonder if it's a good idea to choose optical media for long time storage.

Some DVDs have shown to contain unreadable data after only a few years.

An interesting fact about the problem of long term storage of digital media was described in a Variety article: Digital movies are - as digital storage is not very reliable at this time - stored on film. Not the actual image, I suppose, but their datas.

I wonder if it's not the best to just have more back-up hard drives for long term storage. Let's say one working back-up external, and a second, long term storage external.

A hard disc is at least physical and cannot deteriorate. And in case of mechanical failure, it's unlikely for several hard drives to fail at the same time. As one fails, you can replace it.

Coming are flash hard drives, which may even be more reliable storage, as there are no moving parts. The risk is always, that the stored information is destroyable by magnetic fields. But that can be planned, and you can also have multiple copies in multiple locations.
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skibum187
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2007, 02:20:21 PM »
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I use Retrospect to backup to DVD.  I've also used CronoSync for drive to drive backup, and like the interface, but haven't used it to go to DVDs.

Stay away from Dobry Backuper.... it doesn't keep a log of your DVDs until its done burning, so if the application crashes (like it did to me on 3 separate occasions...) then all your DVDs you had burned (I had 80 something total) are waste.

And I dont think Toast creates an archive list....i could be wrong though
« Last Edit: December 19, 2007, 02:21:44 PM by skibum187 » Logged
X-Re
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« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2007, 10:20:08 PM »
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I wonder if it's a good idea to choose optical media for long time storage.

      Overall, its not. But, I'm a bit paranoid, for starters, and I prefer to back up everything to optical, and then keep everything but the obvious rejects online as well.

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Digital movies are - as digital storage is not very reliable at this time - stored on film. Not the actual image, I suppose, but their datas.

     Actually, they print a neg  But, movie film has the same set of problems that still camera film has - it degrades relatively quickly, in 20-30 years, or so.... But, just in case they lose the hard drives or something.... On a big movie project, we're talking tons of storage, so...

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A hard disc is at least physical and cannot deteriorate. And in case of mechanical failure, it's unlikely for several hard drives to fail at the same time. As one fails, you can replace it.

      That would be great - but right now, its a bit expensive for my budget.


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And I dont think Toast creates an archive list....i could be wrong though
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=161788\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

     I'll check it out - I have Toast, but didn't realize it would span volumes automatically. I'm new to this machine, so still learning a lot  If I can just get it to span volumes, that's better than nothing - I can always write on the things...
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jerryrock
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« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2007, 11:16:21 AM »
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     I'll check it out - I have Toast, but didn't realize it would span volumes automatically. I'm new to this machine, so still learning a lot  If I can just get it to span volumes, that's better than nothing - I can always write on the things...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=161896\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Toast Titanium will span multiple disks (if needed) and automatically catalog the files.
It comes with Deja Vu backup software as an added extra.
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Gerald J Skrocki
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