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Author Topic: Controlling Canon XT  (Read 2800 times)
Peter Jon White
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« on: August 22, 2005, 08:17:54 PM »
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Assuming you're not talking about how to control the light output from the lighting units, but how to know what settings to use?

You need a light meter that reads the light coming from the lighting units. It's called an incident meter. It will have a white hemispherical dome which you place at the subject and point at the camera. It reads the light output from the lighting units. Sekonic makes several very good light meters that work as incident meters. They also sell meters that are only incident type, but you might as well get an all purpose meter.
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mnealtx
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« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2005, 08:46:07 AM »
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Quote
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Assuming you're not talking about how to control the light output from the lighting units, but how to know what settings to use?

You need a light meter that reads the light coming from the lighting units. It's called an incident meter. It will have a white hemispherical dome which you place at the subject and point at the camera. It reads the light output from the lighting units. Sekonic makes several very good light meters that work as incident meters. They also sell meters that are only incident type, but you might as well get an all purpose meter.
Thanks, I was wondering about a light meter.  I was playing around with settings, but do you know how to control both the fStop and the shutter speed in the same mode?  I was told Manual, but when I use manual I can control the shutter speed, but I can't seem to control the fStop.
If you're talking about controlling the aperture setting on the 350D in manual mode, you have to hold the AV button (button on top, right edge of the LCD) while you use the scroll wheel to change aperture settings.

Hopefully this is what you meant, anyway - good luck!
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Mike

Canon 350D, BG-E3 battery grip
Sigma 24-70 f/2.8 EX DG
Canon 70-200 f/2.8 L
420EX flash
Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2005, 06:35:58 PM »
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My advice would be to spend some quality time with the camera manual so you actually know how to operate it. Learn what effect changing ISO, aperture, and shutter speed has on exposure, and how they interact. Then start thinking about mastering lighting. You're trying to understand algebra when you don't even know what a fraction is.
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2005, 09:44:12 PM »
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I have 4 Alien Bees, 2 each of the AB800 and AB400 models. They're excellent lights for the cost, and by the time you outgrow them, you'll be able to afford any light you want.
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xam2006
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« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2005, 06:11:59 PM »
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I know this may sounds dumb, but its ok.  I am a starting photographer and I bought some old gear (4 Photogenic Flashmasters and a Photogenic power box) I'm trying to figure out how to control how bright the light is on the subject?  I use a Digital Rebel XT, Please help if anyone has any ideas! THANKS!
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xam2006
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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2005, 08:26:48 PM »
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Assuming you're not talking about how to control the light output from the lighting units, but how to know what settings to use?

You need a light meter that reads the light coming from the lighting units. It's called an incident meter. It will have a white hemispherical dome which you place at the subject and point at the camera. It reads the light output from the lighting units. Sekonic makes several very good light meters that work as incident meters. They also sell meters that are only incident type, but you might as well get an all purpose meter.
Thanks, I was wondering about a light meter.  I was playing around with settings, but do you know how to control both the fStop and the shutter speed in the same mode?  I was told Manual, but when I use manual I can control the shutter speed, but I can't seem to control the fStop.
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boku
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« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2005, 07:50:22 PM »
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How old is old?

I used to have an OLD (1960's) 4-light Phototgenic rig that used a set of Octal shorting plugs to distribute power amongst the 4-heads in various ratios: 1:1:1:1, 4:2:1:1, 3:3:1:1, etc.

I used a Poloroid back (for my 2-1/4 camera) and a Wein flash meter to set exposure for lighting setups.

Very quaint, very dangerous (the plugs had bare wires - the tripping voltage was 400 - keep kids away).

If you think you have anything like that there are clues - no modeling lamps, power unit covered in turquoise vinyl, shorting plug socket looks like you could plug an old radio tube into it (but don't).

Interesting collectors item. Safe to say it would not be UL approved. I can smell those oil-filled capacitors charging already. Ahh - the good old days.
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Bob Kulon

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xam2006
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« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2005, 04:43:20 PM »
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Old.. um - I know older than I am (17).  I believe the guy told me early 80's.  The power box is a Photogenic Flashmaster AA01 400 watts. It doesnt have any blue vinel or anythiny and there are modeling lights, but two are burned out.  The lights are just photogenic flashmaster (I dunno what the type is). Is there anyway to adjust the lights from the box without getting a different "flash tube" or whatever it is called?

After I posed the first message I started messing around with camera settings and found the lower the ISO the less light it lets in... Right?  My senior photos turned out a LOT better.  I still had to adjust the white balance a bit, but I just did that in Canon's PhotoPro.
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boku
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« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2005, 06:45:16 PM »
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In addition to what Jonathan stated - I'll give you one piece of advice that is worth about $850...

Don't trip those strobes with you Canon 350D unless you use a Wein shutter contact protection device. The shutter contacts in the camera can handle about 50 VDC - the Photogenic box delivers about 400 VCD to the contacts. It may work a few times, but eventually you will burn out the camera unless you use the voltage protection device.
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Bob Kulon

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Play it Straight and Play it True, my Brother.
xam2006
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« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2005, 09:22:48 PM »
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Well crap... I do appreciate the advise though.  So what wouldn't be too powerful for my camera.  I've been doing quite a few senior pictures, church confirmations, and even a couple weddings with them.  But I did find something like AlienBees that look like their for starting photographers.  But I can't really afford anymore lights.... Do you know roughly how much they would be worth on ebay or something?  I have no clue... Everything is still in great shape.  THANKS!
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