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Author Topic: Z3100: Straight through feed?  (Read 2370 times)
walter.sk
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« on: January 20, 2008, 06:42:13 AM »
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I have used my Z3100 with roll paper as well as cut sheets; the sheets were loaded almost vertically, and I presume, curled through the mechanism as they were pulled through the printer.

I am interested in trying some aluminum media that require a straight-through feed.  Is there any way to do this with the Z3100?  I don't remember seeing any information about this in the manual, although I am going to recheck.
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rdonson
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2008, 07:47:42 AM »
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The normal load of sheets is through the "easy path" as its described in the manual.  It takes advantage of the sheet feeder and sounds like that's what you've been using.  That doesn't curl the paper as the path is pretty simple.  It isn't what you'd want to use for a sheet of aluminum though.

The straight path for something like a sheet of aluminum would be to feed it to the printer in the same manner you feed rolls.  The downside would be that if its a long sheet of aluminum some portion of it won't be supported.  That's something you'll want to watch.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2008, 07:48:14 AM by rdonson » Logged

[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
Ron[/span][/span][/span][/span]
walter.sk
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2008, 09:18:07 AM »
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The normal load of sheets is through the "easy path" as its described in the manual.  It takes advantage of the sheet feeder and sounds like that's what you've been using.  That doesn't curl the paper as the path is pretty simple.  It isn't what you'd want to use for a sheet of aluminum though.

The straight path for something like a sheet of aluminum would be to feed it to the printer in the same manner you feed rolls.  The downside would be that if its a long sheet of aluminum some portion of it won't be supported.  That's something you'll want to watch.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=168348\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks for the info.  If I were to load a sheet the same way I feed rolls, would I have to tell the printer it's a sheet or a roll?
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rdonson
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« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2008, 09:36:01 AM »
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Thanks for the info.  If I were to load a sheet the same way I feed rolls, would I have to tell the printer it's a sheet or a roll?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=168362\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Tell it its a sheet.  That way it will determine size.
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[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
Ron[/span][/span][/span][/span]
rdonson
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« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2008, 11:55:08 AM »
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and.... let us know how it works out.   I've been fascinated by the metal offerings from BookSmartStudio but didn't want to be the first to try them in my Z.  
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[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
Ron[/span][/span][/span][/span]
alanmcf
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« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2008, 09:49:04 PM »
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A month ago I was printing on sheets of Arches Infinity paper that I had cut down to 11x47. I got the bright idea to feed them through the slot used for roll paper telling the printer that it was a sheet. Problem was that they printed skewed... meaning I think the pressure on the paper is lighter because a roll must be allowed to slip/adjust to keep it straight.

In addition I got a message a couple of times saying the "paper is too big". I bet 48" is the limit for sheets.

Thanks for the opportunity to share . Alan
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2008, 03:05:10 AM »
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A month ago I was printing on sheets of Arches Infinity paper that I had cut down to 11x47. I got the bright idea to feed them through the slot used for roll paper telling the printer that it was a sheet. Problem was that they printed skewed... meaning I think the pressure on the paper is lighter because a roll must be allowed to slip/adjust to keep it straight.

In addition I got a message a couple of times saying the "paper is too big". I bet 48" is the limit for sheets.

Thanks for the opportunity to share . Alan
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Alan,

90% of the time I feed the sheets through the roll slot. Usually aligning the sheet against the roll core holder at the right. There's no difference in pressure on the transport rolls between rolls and sheets in my opinion. The misalignment is just because the HP is quite critical on what is straight and what not and it measures that in different ways between sheets and rolls. If there's a difference between the pressure it is the result of printer menu choices you have to make between roll and sheet but I doubt it makes a difference. In the new firmware you can go for the deckled edge paper routine which is less critical. HP can not allow slip on roll transport, in the first place unrolling different roll sizes and paper roll types will give a length difference and by that banding and inaccurate lengths. The same more or less for larger and heavier sheets versus smaller and thinner paper and versus rolls. No slip is preferred in all cases. Could well be the reason why the Fiber papers get the roll's embossment.

While the roll slot gives a theoretical straight path there's one point where there should be a mild bend in the sheet when the paper lever is lowered. The transport rolls are located slightly over the 90 degrees top on the transport axle (4 mm estimated) to bend the media downwards where the head passes. The plastic + felt bottom under the head path allow the curve of what a thin sheet will adapt to with that pressure on it, thicker papers and metal will not bend that much. That's a good method to straighten the media over the length of the head pass as well if there are lengthwise (transport direction) waves in the media like canvas can have.

Good to know where the paper width is considered too much. Thank you.


Ernst Dinkla

try: [a href=\"http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Wide_Inkjet_Printers/]http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Wide_Inkjet_Printers/[/url]
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alanmcf
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« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2008, 10:28:00 AM »
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90% of the time I feed the sheets through the roll slot. Usually aligning the sheet against the roll core holder at the right. There's no difference in pressure on the transport rolls between rolls and sheets in my opinion. The misalignment is just because the HP is quite critical on what is straight and what not and it measures that in different ways between sheets and rolls. If there's a difference between the pressure it is the result of printer menu choices you have to make between roll and sheet but I doubt it makes a difference. In the new firmware you can go for the deckled edge paper routine which is less critical. HP can not allow slip on roll transport, in the first place unrolling different roll sizes and paper roll types will give a length difference and by that banding and inaccurate lengths. The same more or less for larger and heavier sheets versus smaller and thinner paper and versus rolls. No slip is preferred in all cases. Could well be the reason why the Fiber papers get the roll's embossment.
Ernst,
All I know for sure is that when I loaded the paper in the normal way (remembering it was a long narrow sheet -- 11x47) everything worked fine. When I loaded through the "roll slot" (which seemed easier with less noise while bending the fairly thick sheet) the sheet printed skewed by about 1/2" difference top to bottom. As you know the printer does a lot of work moving the paper in and out -- all 47" of it -- before it is done. Maybe the roll slot does not check the skew. Or maybe it slips. But it is good to hear your success, so I will try it again one day.
Thanks, Alan
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