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Author Topic: Stop Misspelling "Losing" as "Loosing"!!!  (Read 126128 times)
NikoJorj
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« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2008, 09:01:11 AM »
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The British prefer to use lots of unnecessary letters, as in programme.[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
You mean, they're closer to cilivilized countries?  

Btw, I wouldn't dare to interfere in a british-american war, but the [a href=\"http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/mat]Merriam-Webster dictionary[/url] I use when I feel I really make too many english faults for a frenchman proposes the "mat" spelling for (5th entry) "a border going around a picture between picture and frame or serving as the frame" (while listing the "matte" spelling as a variant).
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2008, 09:07:13 AM »
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You can't see it in the thumbnail, but the seated woman has a tattoo on her arm that reads "Born to loose".
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169229\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Actually she's French and was born in Toulouse!
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GeneB
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« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2008, 09:12:49 AM »
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I definately see alot of spelling errors around here!  
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2008, 09:29:14 AM »
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Ray, I can see this is going to be another Canon v. Nikon with you!

Ciao - Rob C
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169191\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
No, Rob! It's Canonne vs. Nikonne!    
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Gabe
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« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2008, 10:06:20 AM »
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Actually she's French and was born in Toulouse!
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169235\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

   

A friend once suggested that perhaps it's not the word "loose" that has too many 'o's, but the word "to" that is missing one...  
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2008, 10:57:16 AM »
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Lisa, I think you are getting into distinctions between Americanisms and Briticisms here. The British prefer to use lots of unnecessary letters, as in programme.

Matte is both a dull surface as well as a flat material surrounding a photo. In Britain, a mat is something you wipe your feet on.

Well, waddaya know, I just learned something!  Thanks, Ray.

Now if the British can just avoid unutterably confusing visiting Americans with their "lemonade" vs. "lemon juice" definition mismatch, it would really help...  

Lisa

P.S.  Just how do the British disinguish between "lemon juice" as in lemon squeezings and "lemon juice" as in a mixture of water, lemon squeezings, and sugar?  I've never figured it out.
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sojournerphoto
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« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2008, 11:13:25 AM »
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Well, waddaya know, I just learned something!  Thanks, Ray.

Now if the British can just avoid unutterably confusing visiting Americans with their "lemonade" vs. "lemon juice" definition mismatch, it would really help...  

Lisa

P.S.  Just how do the British disinguish between "lemon juice" as in lemon squeezings and "lemon juice" as in a mixture of water, lemon squeezings, and sugar?  I've never figured it out.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169268\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Simple, lemon juice is squash:)
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jjj
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« Reply #27 on: January 24, 2008, 11:25:48 AM »
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Lemonade is a fizzy, ready made lemon drink, lemon squash/cordial is not fizzy and you dilute with water before drinking and lemon juice is straight out of the lemon. Easy, even an American should be able to understand that.  
« Last Edit: January 24, 2008, 11:28:46 AM by jjj » Logged

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Rob C
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« Reply #28 on: January 24, 2008, 12:47:04 PM »
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This reminds me of the photo by Shelby Lee Adams titled Born To Loose, Cannie Creek, 1987


You can't see it in the thumbnail, but the seated woman has a tattoo on her arm that reads "Born to loose".
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169229\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

If you could see it, Gabe, you´d notice that the tattoo is Born Too Loose.

Rob C
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David Sutton
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« Reply #29 on: January 24, 2008, 01:55:17 PM »
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Lemonade is a fizzy, ready made lemon drink, lemon squash/cordial is not fizzy and you dilute with water before drinking and lemon juice is straight out of the lemon. Easy, even an American should be able to understand that. 
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169275\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Over here a lemon squash is lemon cordial with lemonade and if it's not fizzy there'll be trouble. David
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #30 on: January 24, 2008, 03:18:29 PM »
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Lemonade is a fizzy, ready made lemon drink, lemon squash/cordial is not fizzy and you dilute with water before drinking and lemon juice is straight out of the lemon. Easy, even an American should be able to understand that.

Funny, last time I was in Britain (about 5-10 years ago), all the restaurant menus had "lemon juice" (in addition to "lemonade"), and I never once saw "lemon squash".  Did something change recently, or was I just in peculiar and confused restaurants?

Based on my experiences in Britain at the time, I made the following observations:
(1) British "lemonade" = American "lemon-lime soda" (or "lemon-lime pop")
(2) British "lemon juice" = American "lemonade"
(3) British Huh = American "lemon juice" (straight out of the lemon)

So you're saying my observation #2 is no longer true?  (Or ever was?)

Lisa
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Quentin
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« Reply #31 on: January 24, 2008, 03:26:18 PM »
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Lemonade is a fizzy, ready made lemon drink, lemon squash/cordial is not fizzy and you dilute with water before drinking and lemon juice is straight out of the lemon. Easy, even an American should be able to understand that. 
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169275\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

You tell em!  

I've just written a book for a US publisher whose main market is North America, so all the spellings had to be converted to US English - color for colour, program for programme, commas before "and" etc., etc.  Her Majesty would not be amused  

Quentin
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plugsnpixels
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« Reply #32 on: January 24, 2008, 03:34:17 PM »
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Thanks for posting this topic! It's my #1 pet peeve when I read forums.

Quentin: I thought in the US we didn't put commas before "and" (?). At least I learned that somewhere along the way (raised in NJ).
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #33 on: January 24, 2008, 06:21:38 PM »
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Quentin: I thought in the US we didn't put commas before "and" (?). At least I learned that somewhere along the way (raised in NJ).

I've seen both ways claimed as correct various authorities around here.  I think either is considered acceptable.  In day to day use, I've seen about a 50-50 split between the two methods.

Lisa
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Quentin
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« Reply #34 on: January 24, 2008, 06:33:14 PM »
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I've seen both ways claimed as correct various authorities around here.  I think either is considered acceptable.  In day to day use, I've seen about a 50-50 split between the two methods.

Lisa
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169367\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Elsevier like commas.  'nuf said, my protests were doomed  

Quentin
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David Hufford
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« Reply #35 on: January 24, 2008, 10:03:31 PM »
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I once worked as a proofreader for a magazine. The writers were from the US, Britain, Australia, Japan...everywhere. I had many pleasurable hours trying to figure out the "correct" grammar, punctuation, spelling, style, and so on. (Note that I did not use "etc" for that was forbidden except when used in a sentence in parentheses.)

Strangely, it often took hours of back and forth phone calls, e-mails, and tons of research to come to agreement on this stuff. The "rules" aren't especially clear (although everyone assumes that they are) when you start trying to establish a standard for all countries. You can't even get 3 people from the same country to agree. Everyone can almost always come up with evidence to support their version of the rules.

After a few years in that exciting and enjoyable position, I left for other less mind-numbing work. Though it is easy to find errors nearly anywhere---including the New York Times---I have learned not to numbskull myself any more than I already am by worrying about it. (Yes, I realize that "numbskull" is not generally used as a verb.)
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plugsnpixels
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« Reply #36 on: January 24, 2008, 10:16:13 PM »
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As part of my adventures I currently do proofreading (and reviews) for .PSD magazine (published in Warsaw, Poland for a global audience). Contributors come from all over the world. Articles originally written in "English" (often by ESL folks) need a fair bit of work to bring up to readability.

The most fun are the articles originally written in "foreign" (depending on your perspective) languages that get run through Babelfish or some other automatic translation software before I see them! I can do little or nothing to help such copy, as you can imagine (since they are usually tutorials dealing with specific functions of high-end software). So they get published as-is... ;-)

Of course this doesn't take away from what the overall excellent publication offers–it's getting mainstream (available in Borders and Barnes & Noble, etc.), with ads and interviews from names you'd recognize.
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #37 on: January 25, 2008, 03:10:05 AM »
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The "rules" aren't especially clear (although everyone assumes that they are) when you start trying to establish a standard for all countries. You can't even get 3 people from the same country to agree.
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Haven't you got, at least in Great Britain, something like our French Academy (or may I write Academia?) (in French in the text, Académie Française - sorry, this time I feel compelled to include french caracters), who is the one & only voice of authority when it comes to grammar and spelling?

They even have an online dictionary :
[a href=\"http://atilf.atilf.fr/academie9.htm]Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française[/url]
As, unfortunately, the online stuff stops currently to "P" (it's a work in progress), I generally refer to another online dictionary, very aptly named :
Le Trésor de la Langue Française (informatisé)

After that, pleaaaase don't hesitate to correct at least some of my misspellings and other nonsensical translation errors!
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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Quentin
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« Reply #38 on: January 25, 2008, 04:36:16 AM »
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Haven't you got, at least in Great Britain, something like our French Academy (or may I write Academia?) (in French in the text, Académie Française - sorry, this time I feel compelled to include french caracters), who is the one & only voice of authority when it comes to grammar and spelling?

They even have an online dictionary :
Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française
As, unfortunately, the online stuff stops currently to "P" (it's a work in progress), I generally refer to another online dictionary, very aptly named :
Le Trésor de la Langue Française (informatisé)

After that, pleaaaase don't hesitate to correct at least some of my misspellings and other nonsensical translation errors!
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=169423\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

English is adapatable.  The French seem less flexible.  You will recall they intriduced a law outlawing the use of too many English expressions on French TV and radio.  Hilarious.  

Quentin

Quentin
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Mike Louw
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« Reply #39 on: January 25, 2008, 04:38:07 AM »
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Haven't you got, at least in Great Britain, something like our French Academy..

Not bloody likely!  

I can't make up my mind which irritates me more: "loose" or "lense". Now don't get me started on rogue apostrophes!
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