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Author Topic: best digital camera for architecture??  (Read 19935 times)
stacibeth
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« on: February 11, 2008, 04:07:28 PM »
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I have been shooting tons of architecture (interior and exterior) these days and I am wondering what is the best digital setup? I've been looking at the canon 1ds mark3, any advice?HuhHuh
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NicholasR
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« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2008, 04:40:39 PM »
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I have been shooting tons of architecture (interior and exterior) these days and I am wondering what is the best digital setup? I've been looking at the canon 1ds mark3, any advice?HuhHuh
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=174055\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

The best digital setup?  Probably something along the lines of an Alpa XY with P45+ back and a nice selection of wide angles.   You could obviously substitute one of the other plate cameras for the alpa.  Get that credit card warmed up  

You did ask in the MF forum.
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Graham Mitchell
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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2008, 04:41:33 PM »
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Perhaps a view camera with a 33 or 39MP digital back, and lenses as wide as 24mm (18mm equiv on 35mm format) with tilt and shift. What more could you want!
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Graham Mitchell - www.graham-mitchell.com
micek
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« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2008, 04:42:48 PM »
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I have been shooting tons of architecture (interior and exterior) these days and I am wondering what is the best digital setup? I've been looking at the canon 1ds mark3, any advice?HuhHuh
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=174055\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Google up Alpa, Cambo Wide, Silvestri or Gottschalt.
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alexjones
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« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2008, 05:11:46 PM »
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http://www.alpa.ch/en/

They have an XY on the way.  

Hasselblad CF39 for the back.  If you have questions on the back email me.

Alex
Pittsburgh Digital Tech
http://alexrjones.com/alexrjones/digitaltech.html
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stacibeth
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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2008, 05:19:22 PM »
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Thank you all for the advice, keep it comming.

I've been doing alittle research on the cambo wide ds, which is beautiful!!! does anyone know anything about the cambo x2pro?

 what about the canon 1ds with a tilt shift?

Or is dslr out and a view camera is the way to go?
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rsmphoto
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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2008, 05:21:13 PM »
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I think your budget might have a lot to say about what is "best."

There are lots of paths to what ever your final photographic destination is for architectural photography - most are excellent and still continue to improve. One has to split hairs to differentiate between many of them.

Richard


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I have been shooting tons of architecture (interior and exterior) these days and I am wondering what is the best digital setup? I've been looking at the canon 1ds mark3, any advice?HuhHuh
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=174055\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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alexjones
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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2008, 05:43:09 PM »
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Stacibeth,

It all depends on the level that you want to work at and how much you are willing to spend.  The choices you make will have a great effect of the work you do beyond resolution and the tech stuff.  How does it handle and how versatile is it.  If you are going to invest in a back then the Hasselblad is one of the more flexible ones in terms of what will it work with, in it's case nearly anything and easily.  I have an upgrade on the way and that is another point to consider.  How good is the future upgrade path.  All of the backs are good at the price range that they are in.  Dealer choice is also something to consider on the service side.  Some backs do somethings better than others.

Best,

Alex
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witz
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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2008, 05:50:15 PM »
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I think your budget might have a lot to say about what is "best."

There are lots of paths to what ever your final photographic destination is for architectural photography - most are excellent and still continue to improve. One has to split hairs to differentiate between many of them.

Richard
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=174066\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

if 11x17" 300dpi files are what your clients are hoping for, then the 1ds3 with a "good" 17-40 L and photoshop with crop/perspective will do the job nicely.

a good hdr workflow for unforgiving indoor/outdoor ratios as well.
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ericstaud
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« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2008, 05:54:38 PM »
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Show us your work.  What camera do you shoot with now?  What lenses do you have?  What lenses do you use for the majority of the work you shoot?  What kind of clients do you work for?  Just saying you shoot architecture doesn't really describe what you do and what kind of camera you'll need.

The Alpa XY, Phase One P45 route is no more expensive that shooting film with a 4x5 camera, and the quality is very good.
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David WM
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« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2008, 05:59:13 PM »
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Hi Alex
I haven't seen much posted here about the 39MP backs in relation to Architecture work. Do you have any experience with how well they behave with very wide lenses like the 24mm Apo digitar in regards to any colour shifting or other side effects of using such wide lenses?
regards
David
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Hasselblad CF39 for the back.
Alex
Pittsburgh Digital Tech
http://alexrjones.com/alexrjones/digitaltech.html
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=174064\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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stacibeth
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« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2008, 06:01:21 PM »
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I am currently shooting with the canon 5d and a 24mm tilt shift, I have found that I am just spending way to much time in post production retouching the perspective.

I was thinking of upgrading to the canon 1ds mark3, but then discovered the cambo wide ds and maybe a phase one p25 back, there is a large price difference though. But if the cambo is going to produce a better image then i can eat the extra cost

i don't know anything about digital backs though?HuhHuhHuhHuh
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stacibeth
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« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2008, 06:03:14 PM »
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www.stacyzarinphoto.com, click on environments,
the images at the end are the newest.

currently most with the canon 5d and 24mm ts lens
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stacibeth
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« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2008, 06:05:49 PM »
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i'm shooting for architects and interior designers mostly for their portfolios.

I also shoot for Home/interior/regional magazines

so the need for digital over film is a big deal.

stacy
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H1/A75 Guy
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« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2008, 06:10:56 PM »
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i don't know anything about digital backs though?HuhHuhHuhHuh
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There is allot of info on this forum on your topic if you type architecture and do a search. For starters:  [a href=\"http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=21188]http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index....showtopic=21188[/url]. Then, for what you don't find, you can ask more specific questions.
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alexjones
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« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2008, 06:11:04 PM »
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Hi Alex
I haven't seen much posted here about the 39MP backs in relation to Architecture work. Do you have any experience with how well they behave with very wide lenses like the 24mm Apo digitar in regards to any colour shifting or other side effects of using such wide lenses?
regards
David
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

David,

No, I wish I could give you some specifics on that one.  Most of what I do is with a 555ELD and Superwide 903 SWC.  Some of it is with a Horseman Digiflex.  With the lenses that I have it has been very nice so I would expect that to carry over to that range of lenses as well.  It would certainly be something to test and compare.  What I have seen is that the 132c does not seem to add any problems of its own.  The fringing or aberrations that are there I believe are due to the optics.  Architecture is I believe the most demanding discipline for digital capture.  Lens aberrations of all kind and a host of other limitations to work around.  One of the advances that the new CF39 has is a new glass that is supposed to minimize the ghosting around bright light sources which is one of the challenges with windows and lighting.  The majority of what I work on is people and product with some architecture in the mix.  Below is a link that shows the kit.

I like Stacy's question.  Open ended and a good conversation starter.  No need to dig through countless posts bogged down in small detail at this point.

Best,

Alex

[a href=\"http://alexrjones.com/alexrjones/camera.html]http://alexrjones.com/alexrjones/camera.html[/url]
« Last Edit: February 11, 2008, 06:19:43 PM by alexjones » Logged
jimgolden
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« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2008, 06:34:23 PM »
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I have shot with the cambo x2-pro - really a slick setup - with a 1DSxx or a 5D - I have shot mostly still life with it, but have done some architecture with it. very portable, construction is good.

- the "digital" LF lenses are amazing on it, but not cheap and you are limited to front standard movements only. due to the sensor size, VERY small movements can make a big difference - nothing like LF movements

- the biggest drawback IMHO is the 35mm viewfinder and focusing - you need to shoot tethered
and a 2x Canon eyepiece is a must
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ericstaud
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« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2008, 08:10:06 PM »
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Thanks for showing your work Staci.

The MF choice is difficult for many.  When working with 4x5 film it was common for the film and processing bill to be in the range of 500-1500 dollars for one day of work.  To roll this expense into a fee for the digital camera is a no brainer.  You essentially buy many many jobs worth of film, processing, and polaroid up front when you get a digital camera rather than paying over the long term.

It is important to also start charging clients for the time spent processing and retouching each image at the studio.  They used to spend good money to have every piece of film scanned in the past.

The Alpa/P45 slows me down over using a 5d, but makes every lens a shift lens, gives me great quality, and saves me time retouching the day after the shoot.

If you are in a market where every other shooter is charging $100.00/day for using their 5D or worse yet not charging at all, then charging $500.00 for your fancy Alpa will be more difficult.

You might also want to buy an H1, Hy6, or Contax to shoot your portraiture and other jobs with your MFDB.  Once you have the MF option it would be a shame to shoot those other jobs with the Canon.
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alexjones
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« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2008, 08:16:43 PM »
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Eric is spot on.  Couldn't say it any better.
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Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2008, 09:19:30 PM »
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i don't know anything about digital backs though?HuhHuhHuhHuh
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=174078\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Then you need to read every thread on the forum - then you will know too much !

-------

Your 'problem' in you first post is time saving - so save that time another way - pay someone to do your retouching !

----------

The whole digicam thing is a minefield

The MF costs are stupid - but so are the costs of upgrading a DSLR every year if you feel that need

I own a D3 which is an amazing camera to use it is so fast and flexible the AF is great, the live view fantastic there are loads of cheap lenses and the ISO amazing

I own an H1, the AF is poor, the live view non existant, the range of lenses poor, the lenses are a rip off and my 22mp back is only good for 100 ISO max so its tripod time all the time indoors

but the files from my 22mp back are more than twice as good as the D3

I own a sinar P2 I have never really used it (on location) because shooting with my H1 and correcting the perspective is so much faster and easier

Every bit of kit there are pros and cons

Canons may be OK, but they have a wierd reputation for thier wide lenses, the AA filter makes the files soft compared to a MF back of the sime size and you cant clean the sensor easily

Hassies - no shift lens - great camera expensive

Mamiya - cheap but crap shutter flash synch (there is a shift lens from the 80s) and the 28mm lense is so expensive you can almost buy a cambo and a better lens for the price

Rollei - Expensive no wide or shift

Mirrorless cameras (alpa/horseman/cambo) - great lenses - very expensive and slow to use

What would I recomend?

I have no idea every solution has an up and a down side

SMM
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Sam Morgan Moore Cornwall
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