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Author Topic: Interior Lights  (Read 30321 times)
JoeKitchen
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« Reply #120 on: December 08, 2009, 03:45:31 PM »
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I would like to get some silks but can not find them on the B&H website, what are the referred to as?
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Joe Kitchen
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"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
Craig Lamson
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« Reply #121 on: December 08, 2009, 04:00:40 PM »
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Quote from: JoeKitchen
I would like to get some silks but can not find them on the B&H website, what are the referred to as?

I've been making mine to fit my panels for some time, just buy Nylon Taffetta, and sew it.  It helps to have a surger (my wife does) for the edges.  Everyone wants way too much money for pre-made panel fabrics.
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Craig Lamson Photo
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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #122 on: December 08, 2009, 04:03:37 PM »
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Quote from: infocusinc
I've been making mine to fit my panels for some time, just buy Nylon Taffetta, and sew it.  It helps to have a surger (my wife does) for the edges.  Everyone wants way too much money for pre-made panel fabrics.
That sounds like a much better way to go.  Joanne Fabrics here I come.
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Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
CBarrett
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« Reply #123 on: December 08, 2009, 04:20:45 PM »
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Quote from: bavanor
Same three.  I do my HDR by hand with Layers.  To me Photomatrix dims the highlights to much and lightens the shadows to much, it just doesn't look right.

Question for CB on your photo you think is a good mix of your old and new style.  The reflection of the window on the wood ceiling, how do you feel about it.  I go back and forth on reflections that cause color balance to shift (in the photo to a blue cool color).  Sometimes I want to remove it completely to represent the materials texture and true balanced color.  But in truth that is how the wood ceiling looks on site.  And I want to show that truth sometimes.  

So my questions to you is would the old you tried to of removed that completely with lighting?  And is the new you trying to keep elements of this sort in your photos?  How about other people here, how you resolve these lighting issues?

Aaron


I take that on a shot by shot basis.  Sometimes the color of the reflection feels perfect, other times it destroys the richness of the material beneath it.  I think it depends on the space.  Frequently I'll do a Hue/Sat adj layer, select that blue (or whatever color) and desaturate it a little bit (masking the adj layer if need be)

On Silks....

I have two of these.

and seven of these.

For the Calumet panels, I didn't like their aluminum frames and made my own out of PVC (with elastic cord running through) $2.50 in PVC versus $70 for Calumet frame.
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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #124 on: December 08, 2009, 04:47:09 PM »
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Quote from: CBarrett
For the Calumet panels, I didn't like their aluminum frames and made my own out of PVC (with elastic cord running through) $2.50 in PVC versus $70 for Calumet frame.

Mine are some of the original Dean Collins Lightforms from 20 years ago...

What was it about the Calumet frames you did not like?
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Craig Lamson Photo
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CBarrett
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« Reply #125 on: December 08, 2009, 04:59:27 PM »
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Quote from: infocusinc
Mine are some of the original Dean Collins Lightforms from 20 years ago...

What was it about the Calumet frames you did not like?

They weren't any lighter or more compact than my PVC frames and you have to align the channels on each tube before you can slip them together... too sloooooow.

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bavanor
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« Reply #126 on: December 08, 2009, 07:47:43 PM »
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What do you think is you all's favorite (or what you use the most) light modifier?  Barn doors, silk panel, nothing, etc

Aaron
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bavanor
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« Reply #127 on: December 08, 2009, 07:51:36 PM »
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Craig,

Do you ever have a client complain about the distortion caused by the 12mm lens?  I have and was curious what your experience has been.  Even though I don't know what else you could do to get that type of shot in such a small space.  Unless you get a really big saw and cut the boat in half.  For some reason I don't think the owner/client would like that  
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CBarrett
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« Reply #128 on: December 08, 2009, 09:07:44 PM »
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Quote from: Kirk Gittings
Exposure blend plus some additional post mainly to perk up the midtones which tend to get a little flat and lifeless.

I like Tony Kuyper's Luminoscity Masks for this.


Thanks for the link Kirk, this rocks!  Just sent Tony 25 bucks.
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LiamStrain
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« Reply #129 on: December 08, 2009, 09:09:54 PM »
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Quote from: bavanor
What do you think is you all's favorite (or what you use the most) light modifier?  Barn doors, silk panel, nothing, etc

Aaron

Barn doors and grids. (Blackwrap in a pinch) If you can't control where the light does and doesn't go, you're working against yourself.
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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #130 on: December 08, 2009, 09:15:13 PM »
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Quote from: bavanor
Craig,

Do you ever have a client complain about the distortion caused by the 12mm lens?  I have and was curious what your experience has been.  Even though I don't know what else you could do to get that type of shot in such a small space.  Unless you get a really big saw and cut the boat in half.  For some reason I don't think the owner/client would like that  

Never on a boat, a few times on RV's.  It's a bunch easier to use a longer lens in an RV if needed but even thsn 24 is almost to long to show any sense of space.  When they complain tell them to crop, its the same as using a longer lens

With the 12 you really need to watch what you put near the camera. Also keep in mind I usually lose a bit of the image to perspective correction.
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Craig Lamson Photo
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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #131 on: December 08, 2009, 09:36:48 PM »
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Quote from: bavanor
What do you think is you all's favorite (or what you use the most) light modifier?  Barn doors, silk panel, nothing, etc

Aaron
Depends on the shot, sometime the barndoors are really important, sometime gels are needed more (like diffusion gels and color correction gels or even theatrical color gels).  Like if I am lighting desks or chairs and need nice highlights in certain areas, barndoors are essential.  But if I am lighting a ceiling with exposed beams and want highlights or need to even out the light but can not avoids shadows, I really need diffusion gels to soften the edges.

FYI, Lee makes a really cool diffusion gel called brushed silk; makes the light into a soft oval as long as you are at least 12 feet away from your subject.  Really great applications.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2009, 09:38:35 PM by JoeKitchen » Logged

Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
bavanor
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« Reply #132 on: December 08, 2009, 11:05:08 PM »
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Quote from: JoeKitchen
Depends on the shot, sometime the barndoors are really important, sometime gels are needed more (like diffusion gels and color correction gels or even theatrical color gels).  Like if I am lighting desks or chairs and need nice highlights in certain areas, barndoors are essential.  But if I am lighting a ceiling with exposed beams and want highlights or need to even out the light but can not avoids shadows, I really need diffusion gels to soften the edges.

FYI, Lee makes a really cool diffusion gel called brushed silk; makes the light into a soft oval as long as you are at least 12 feet away from your subject.  Really great applications.

I will have to check that Lee gel out.  While working in architecture I remember Ledalite had some 2x2 and 2x4 flourescent lights with a new diffuser called MesoOptics.  I would love to try and use it as a diffuser for photography lighting.  Though I doubt if it would be cheap.
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CBarrett
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« Reply #133 on: December 10, 2009, 09:13:35 PM »
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Since I posted the lit and unlit versions, I thought I would go ahead and put up the retouched finals.








-CB
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SeanKarns
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« Reply #134 on: December 10, 2009, 09:34:55 PM »
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Lovely.
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #135 on: December 10, 2009, 09:42:43 PM »
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Really nice Chris.
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Thanks,
Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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LiamStrain
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« Reply #136 on: December 10, 2009, 09:56:40 PM »
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Nice work Chris.

IBM Building? That marble floor and wood color looks familiar.
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CBarrett
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« Reply #137 on: December 10, 2009, 10:13:57 PM »
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Quote from: LiamStrain
Nice work Chris.

IBM Building? That marble floor and wood color looks familiar.


Sears Tower (which I will always call it)  61st floor, dawn to dusk last saturday.
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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #138 on: December 10, 2009, 11:47:06 PM »
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Superb Chris, especially the 2nd and 4th.
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Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
JoeKitchen
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« Reply #139 on: December 11, 2009, 11:51:43 AM »
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I believe this topic started out with the asking for advice in what kind of lighting equipment to get.  Well I just thought of something overlooked here, and that is light stands.  For the person who started this topic, if you are still reading it, don't go cheap with light stands.  I got a couple of cheap ones when I started and they suck.  The legs don't open wide enough given little stability and some of the screws are made of plastic.  Now I opt for calumet brand air cushioned light stands, 10 ft mostly.
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Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
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