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Author Topic: DSLR dynamic range  (Read 14213 times)
Justinr
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« Reply #20 on: March 21, 2008, 05:23:00 AM »
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Dynamic range is not just a function of the maths and electronics. There is the fundamental issue of pixel size. The larger the pixel the greater the dynamic range which is why dMF scores so well on this front. I've no idea about the latest Nikon but the Canon 1D has a DR of 9.5 stops and my 30D doesn't even have it specified in the instruction manual, but the cheap and cheerful ZD blows the socks off both of them with a DR of 12. Phase One, off the record, are talking about 14 in their latest backs.

Certainly I found the leap from the dSLR to the dMF gives me far more latitude in exposure and I am finding that it can be as forgiving as Portra 400, probably more so when shooting RAW. This does away with the need for a 1,001 fancy metering modes which, let's be honest, are only there to make up for the shortcoming's of the chip.  

Camera marketing has been based on an arms race of pixel count. This, I believe, is drawing to a close and it will be the DR that the admen will latch on to as being the new best thing for a camera to have.


Justin.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2008, 07:02:22 AM by Justinr » Logged

eleanorbrown
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« Reply #21 on: March 21, 2008, 09:37:40 AM »
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Personally I think companies exaggerate about DR capabilities in their cameras.  currently I use a P45+ back and it can go about 2.5 or so, give or take, stops above middle gray before it blows out.  That leave a lot of it's dynamic range below middle gray.  I would say 12 stops total DR (incl. highlights), but no more.  I love the back by the way, just being realistic about what it can and can't do.  eleanor
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