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Author Topic: Cold weather gloves  (Read 7898 times)
paullantz
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« on: February 21, 2008, 02:05:18 PM »
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Like a lot of people I was standing around outside watching and trying to photograph the lunar eclipse last night -- I like Michael Reichmann's shot from Maui, I envied him a warm climate.
It was hard on the fingers taking pictures last night.
I am curious what people wear on their hands in cold weather, what do you use so you can still fiddle with camera and tripod adjustments?
I have tried a lot of different gloves but the cold from big hunks of frozen metal gets into most everything. Sometimes I use heading pads inside my gloves/mitts but I still end up having to take my fingers out to press  tiny little buttons and turn dials.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2008, 06:44:18 PM by paullantz » Logged
Colorado David
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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2008, 02:19:39 PM »
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I work in the cold for long hours a lot.  So far, this is my solution.  I use the Justin Charles Merino Wool glove liners inside a pair of (can't remember the brand) polar-fleece fingerless gloves/mittens.  These are the fold over mitten with the fingerless glove beneath.  The Merino Wool glove liners are warm by themselves but need the outer glove/mitten to cut the wind and in very cold weather. They fit tight enough to the skin to provide tactile accuracy.  Get your outer layer large enough that it doesn't hurt your circulation or your hands will be cold no matter what you do.  In severe cold, I'll add HotHands chemical heat packs to the inside.  I have more trouble keeping my feet warm.  I'll work out a boot solution before next year.
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EBBS
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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2008, 03:23:44 PM »
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Windproof fleece gloves with chemical hand warmer packets in the palm.  This is good for me down to about -10 deg. F.  Anything colder and nothing seems to help other than big thick gloves.  Once your fingers go numb the pain goes away!  
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2008, 06:51:35 PM »
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Like Colorado David, I take a two-layer approach, with a thin "glove liner" layer underneath and a thick, warm glove layer over.  When I need to fiddle with the camera, I temporarily take off the thick layer, and I can fiddle with buttons with the liner layer, which is much better than nothing.  As soon as button-fiddling is finished (which is hopefully before the cold fully seeps through the liners), the thick outer layer goes back on.  It works pretty well for me.

Lisa
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JDClements
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« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2008, 08:48:54 PM »
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I use SealSkinz gloves. They are waterproof, but breath and are covered with thousands of gripper dots. Mine are originally for kayaking, but work great with photography, or anything where you need grip and fine motor skills.

A pair of over-mits like those mentioned (where you can open up the fingers) help in really cold weather. Just fold the mitt back to expose the SealSkinz underneath.
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dobson
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« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2008, 01:22:27 AM »
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If it isn't too cold, I usually wear my Black Diamond Powerstretch gloves. They're simply a polartech glove with a leather palm. They cut the wind a bit and they're warm wen wet.

When those cease to cut it, I wear my BD ice gloves. These are much bulkier than single layer gloves, but thinner than comparable skiing gloves and they will keep your hands warm to about -20F. Originally designed for ice climbing, they are really good at keeping your hands dexterous and warm, (you can't be dropping equipment when climbing).

I found that when it's really cold, it's possible to shoot with mittens on. I use a 20D and can still handle all of the buttons and dials if I need to. The lens caps and hoods are a pain, but you can work around it. Just a little practice is all it takes.

I shy away from chemical warmers. I keep a couple in my pack for emergencies, but haven't needed them. Relying on them for your warmth could get dangerous when they run out.



Colorado David - Have you looked at plastic mountain boots? They work on a principle similar to ski boots, with a shell and an inner insulated layer. The only difference is that they don't suck to hike/climb in (much). Some brands I can think of are Lowa, Koflach, Vasque, Scarpa and La Sportiva. Expensive yes,but they're available used for much less, and it beats frostbite.
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David Sutton
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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2008, 01:55:38 AM »
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Merino/possum fur gloves. Lightweight enough to fiddle with buttons, but the fur being hollow, it is highly insulating. Stock up and save NZ's native forests and birds. David
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2008, 03:27:55 AM »
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If it isn't too cold, I usually wear my Black Diamond Powerstretch gloves.

When those cease to cut it, I wear my BD ice gloves. These are much bulkier than single layer gloves, but thinner than comparable skiing gloves and they will keep your hands warm to about -20F. Originally designed for ice climbing, they are really good at keeping your hands dexterous and warm, (you can't be dropping equipment when climbing).
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=176596\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Real close to what I do, I am also a Black Diamond fan after a Mammut period that left me disapointed with their quality control and uber pricing policy. BD has great design and quality.

I'd add on top of that my BD Samurai (Gore XCR and Primaloft), they are of course more bulky and a lot warmer than the other 2 (ok to -18C - tried them skiing at -10C for 4 hours last in stong wind while skiing and zero problem) but I can still operate the important controls of my D3 with them (the 2 control wheels, focus ring and the remote trigger).

If you shoot in the cold often, I advice you try out a D3, this camera looks like it was designed by people wearing gloves all year long.

Cheers,
Bernard
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2008, 10:06:25 AM »
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The one problem with my two-layer approach is that my inner liner layer, which is the only layer when I'm using the camera, isn't waterproof.  If it's raining or even sprinkling, they rapidly get soaked through.  Can someone recommend a thin inner layer that's reasonably waterproof, or even water-resistant?

Lisa
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Nill Toulme
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« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2008, 10:14:09 AM »
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That would be SealSkinz.

Nill
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Hank
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« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2008, 10:15:11 AM »
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The one problem with my two-layer approach is that my inner liner layer, which is the only layer when I'm using the camera, isn't waterproof.  If it's raining or even sprinkling, they rapidly get soaked through.  Can someone recommend a thin inner layer that's reasonably waterproof, or even water-resistant?

Lisa
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Wet and cold are standard here.  I use a similar two-layer system, but I've given up on waterproof for liners.  Pretty soon they're wetter inside than out.

The best compromise has been thin polypro liners.  They're cheap, effective when wet, and small enough to keep several pairs of spares in a pocket.  Just wring them out when wet, and they go right back to work.

The biggest modification of my system is a collection of those disposable catalytic  hand warmers.  They're around a buck a pair and not much bigger than tea bags.  Slip one into the palm of each hand between the two glove layers.  They work for about 8 hours unless you get them wet.  No way around that in wet weather, so I keep spares in a pocket.

They're also handy in really cold weather to tape over the battery compartment on a camera.  They'll really extend battery life when you do it right.
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Colorado David
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« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2008, 10:15:16 AM »
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Even though Merino Wool is neither water proof nor water resistant, it will still keep you warm.  Merino wool will dry faster, wick moisture away from your body, and still insulate, unlike man-made fibers.  In very cold weather I wear two layers of Merino Wool long underwear, a fine weave base layer and a heavier layer.  I have gotten completely soaked and still remained comfortable.  One time I took it all off, rung out the water and put it back on and stayed warm.
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gdanmitchell
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« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2008, 11:28:35 AM »
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I'm also a "two layer" kinda' guy. I prefer to not try to work in thick gloves, so I try to take of the outer gloves and just use the liner-weight gloves when operating the camera. (Actually, to be more accurate, I try to just wear the liners until my hands start to freeze, at which point I put on something warmer long enough to get the feeling back. ;-)

But the cold I deal with doesn't compete with what some of you describe. Mostly I'm dealing with 30s on down to perhaps the teens.

Dan
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G Dan Mitchell
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2008, 11:52:50 AM »
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Thanks for the liner comments.  I'll go to an outdoor gear store and check out the wool & polypropylene options.

Lisa
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Hank
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« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2008, 12:21:51 PM »
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Here's a neat test for you Nniko-

Run really cold water into the bathroom basin, even add ice if it's not uncomfortably cold.  Now dunk and thoroughly saturate two socks in it- one wool and one polypro.

Pull them both out and wring as thoroughly as you can.  

Stick a hand inside each one, and decide which is doing the better job.

Soggy wool certainly works better than soggy cotton.  But it can't even find the candle, much less hold a candle up to polypro.

I love my wool and wool products.  Heck, I'm even one of the rare testosterone-infused weavers.  But for serious outdoor wet and cold conditions, the polypro goes next to my body and the wool stays home nice and clean for town wear.
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Colorado David
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« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2008, 12:35:05 PM »
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Believe what you want to, but my experience is different.


Thermal resistance
In cold conditions, merino wool fabrics effectively reduce the rate of heat transfer to the environment, assisting the body to maintain its optimal temperature. Its thermal resistance lies in its ability to immobilize air within the matrix of the fiber and the fabric preventing the skin temperature to be exposed to cold air directly.

Even when in damp and cold conditions, merino wool retains its ability to resist heat loss. Wet garments made of synthetic fabrics conduct heat away from the body up to 25 times faster than dry garments because the thermal conductivity of water far exceeds that of air.

The thermal conductivity of merino fabrics remains low in comparison to other fabric types even when it is fully saturated. This is due to its ability to retain pockets of air between the fibers due to their natural crimp and one other very special attribute… heat generation.

When the Merino fiber absorbs moisture, there is a small release of heat when the water vapor molecules chemically bond to the inner structure of the fiber. this response means that the wearer does not experience a chill as conditions get damp.
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Tim Gray
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« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2008, 02:22:03 PM »
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Might as well weigh in here too.

Without entering the wool/poly debate with both feet, my experience (Alberta and Ontario winters) is the man made stuff is the way to go for the inner layer.  

From a hand perspective, I'm actually a 4 layer guy.  First is a very thin inner glove, then a second thin glove that's somewhat windproof (I think it may be a cycling glove), third a denser longer fiber glove.  I chose these 3 by basically trying on a whole slew of combinations at the local Mtn Equipment co-op.  I can do most everything on my 1ds3 with these 3 layers except open the battery compartment, and I actually don't have to take any layers off for that either, just get my car keys out and pry it open with a key.  The only thing I flat can't do is pry open the remote cover, going through a RRS L plate.  That needs a finger nail.

Those 3 layers keep me fine for most shooting conditions.  The 4th layer is actually a pair of slightly insulated mittens, connected to each other with an "idiot string" so when I take them off, I don't have to pocket them, just let them dangle.  I wear these when moving from one place to the next then drop them while shooting.

The one mistake I made when first putting the layers together was choosing a second layer that was too tight - that's one of the worst mistakes you can make.
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Hank
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« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2008, 11:42:19 AM »
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The one mistake I made when first putting the layers together was choosing a second layer that was too tight - that's one of the worst mistakes you can make.
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Boy, is that ever the truth.  It's less commonly an issue with gloves, but consistently an issue with foot gear.  Most folks who don't spend much time in the cold simply add a pair of socks to their usual footgear, tightening the fit in the process.  If circulation is limited as a result, even a little, cold feet will drive you indoors as quickly as cold hands.

Folks living and working in the cold on a regular basis usually have solved the problem in opting for looser winter foot gear, but casual visitors are unlikely to buy new boots for a short junket.  On their first visit anyway..............  Obviously the same applies for gloves!
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santa
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« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2008, 01:10:04 AM »
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wool or poly pro..doesn't make much difference.  the basic deal is what has been described here, a thin pair for use when you are manipulating the camera, a thick overpair all the other time. I like patagonia thin polypro for my inner gloves. I normally bring three pair when I go out. Along with them I bring a pair of thick polypro. I prefer non-windproof if it's not windy. I bring a pair of medium weight polypro windproof gloves too but don't use them unless it's actually windy or the other gloves get wet, which they rarely do cause our snow is mostly dry. I also bring a pair of very warm gloves. Thick, puffy warm gloves.
   with these layers I'm good from any temp from +40 to -40F, easily.
-20F and a 20mph wind.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2008, 01:17:00 AM by santa » Logged
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