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Author Topic: Lighting Architecture  (Read 36377 times)
rainer_v
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« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2008, 06:05:51 PM »
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Thanks everyone for your feedback. Ranier, you have a really wonderful website. I really enjoy all your images. It's inspiring photographs like that that keep a young student like me going. Thanks!

Bevan
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thank you .....
very nice
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rainer viertlböck
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ohshannon
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« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2008, 09:42:07 PM »
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i always Lighting interiors in the way i think its beautiful , its very depends and also shows the value of the photographer.
do whatever you think is beautiful but make sure you got the paycheck  
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David WM
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« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2008, 11:07:43 PM »
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Thanks for the detailed reply, appreciate it. My mainstay is 8x500J Esprit heads, and there is some variation between the heads, but not enough to cause great concern, Sounds like Bowens and Elinchrom could be mixed successfully.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178850\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I forgot to mention that the 20cm elinchrom reflectors are the same outside diameter as the Bowens 20cm, so you can swap honeycombe, barn doors, etc  between the two.

Natural light is good to work with, but for example, with the attached photo, I would have needed to shoot it early morning to get light streaming into the room. The location was 200km away and I needed to shoot 3 floors of the apartment on the one day.  I have a warm gel 3k head hanging out over the edge of the balcony with  ockey straps and ropes on the base of the light stand. Shooting into large windows makes it hard to hide reflections of lights inside so you can't always put them where you want them anyway.
David
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jonstewart
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« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2008, 02:25:24 AM »
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I forgot to mention that the 20cm elinchrom reflectors are the same outside diameter as the Bowens 20cm, so you can swap honeycombe, barn doors, etc  between the two.

Natural light is good to work with, but for example, with the attached photo, I would have needed to shoot it early morning to get light streaming into the room. The location was 200km away and I needed to shoot 3 floors of the apartment on the one day.  I have a warm gel 3k head hanging out over the edge of the balcony with  ockey straps and ropes on the base of the light stand. Shooting into large windows makes it hard to hide reflections of lights inside so you can't always put them where you want them anyway.
David
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178985\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Even better re the interchangeability.

I think the main message for Bevan here is that simulating the look you want is the name of the game. Then it's just execution!
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Jon Stewart

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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2008, 10:34:18 AM »
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There is allot of good experience being shared here. Lighting interiors is a complex subject and difficult to explain verbally. I spend a whole semester on it where I teach and just cover the basics. Having said that.......personally I am self taught, in that I never assisted anyone or took a class, but I don't recommend it. Assisting is the best way to learn and shortcut the process. It is true that digital reduces the need for lighting, but far from eliminates it. With film we were lighting interiors 95% of the time (sometimes just to clean up the light so it matched the balance of a particular film), with digital we are around 30-40%. With film we carried 6-7 powerpacks (4-2000 watt and 2-3 800 watt powerpacks and 10-12 heads). With digital we carry four powerpacks (2-2000 watt and 2-800 watt) and rarely use them all. Of course with film we were lighting so that the transparency was the final product, with digital we are making files so that we have all the information we need to do the post production work.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 03:58:14 PM by Kirk Gittings » Logged

Thanks,
Kirk

Kirk Gittings
Architecture and Landscape Photography
WWW.GITTINGSPHOTO.COM

LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)
pixjohn
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« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2008, 08:06:14 PM »
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What is natural looking to one person, is not necessarily natural looking to another. My own preference is the use of nice lighting techniques. My own personal view most rooms just using natural light look flat. The fabrics, walls and furture just don't have depth.
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David WM
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« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2008, 08:14:42 AM »
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What is natural looking to one person, is not necessarily natural looking to another. My own preference is the use of nice lighting techniques. My own personal view most rooms just using natural light look flat. The fabrics, walls and furture just don't have depth.

John, I think the lighting is great. Just wondering how long it takes you to light a room like that and if you get it all in camera or use some pp to achieve it.
David
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lance_schad
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« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2008, 10:34:14 AM »
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Hello since we are on the topic of lighting I thought you all may be interested in taking a look at an informative article that Jeffery Totaro has written for out latest version of our newsletter. It is about a multiple strobe pop for interior lighting technique that he has used and prompted him to have a device designed that allows him to achieve this (available through Capture Integration) .
Also in the newsletter are a Wide Angle Test comparison and a primer on using HDR in Capture One 4.0, RAW developer comparisons and more.
Here is the url to take please take a look at : http://tinyurl.com/32l9jy .
If you are not already subscriber and you like it please subscribe.

Enjoy,


Lance Schad
Capture Integration - Miami/Atlanta
305-394-3196 cell | 305-534-5702 office
Capture Integration , Phase One Dealer of the Year
lance@captureintegration.com
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LANCE SCHAD - DIGITAL TRANSITIONS - Phase One,Leaf/Mamiya,Arca-Swiss,Cambo value added reseller
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Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #28 on: March 06, 2008, 12:34:00 PM »
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with the attached photo, [a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178985\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Not wanting to criticise specific work or individuals - but to cause more useful chat

With the attached image I am wondering 'as a casual observer' how come the fronts of the chairs are so bright when they are facing away from the window - it doesnt make visual sense

I think part of the art of using flash needs to be to subtely lift the room (ie lower the DR in the image but not intefere with the actual balance) or create an impression of a pretend window on the other side of the room that we cant see in shot.

The image must still be 'plausable' to the viewer

SMM
« Last Edit: March 06, 2008, 12:36:53 PM by Morgan_Moore » Logged

Sam Morgan Moore Cornwall
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Chris Livsey
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« Reply #29 on: March 06, 2008, 12:49:19 PM »
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Not wanting to criticise specific work or individuals - but to cause more useful chat
With the attached image I am wondering 'as a casual observer' how come the fronts of the chairs are so bright when they are facing away from the window - it doesnt make visual sense
SMM
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179624\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I was disconcerted by the chair casting a shadow from the window light but the towels casting one in the opposite direction. OTOH I was VERY impressed with the balance achieved between the inside scene and the outside view.
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ATB
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pixjohn
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« Reply #30 on: March 06, 2008, 01:48:38 PM »
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Its takes about 2-3 hours per shot. The  image is 3 shots if I remember. 1 main shot for the room, 2nd shot for the fire place and tv exposure and the 3rd shot for the glass window on the right to remove reflections. With out the use of light, this room would just look flat.

Some people might think I am crazy for using so much light and I also think I am crazy for using so much light but I just like the look.


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John, I think the lighting is great. Just wondering how long it takes you to light a room like that and if you get it all in camera or use some pp to achieve it.
David
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179562\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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David WM
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« Reply #31 on: March 06, 2008, 04:19:57 PM »
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The image must still be 'plausable' to the viewer
SMM
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Yes I think the light off to the left could be backed off. It was a 1m sq softbox without any cutters etc and I don't like dead, flat areas. The more it is backed off the darker right side gets, and it has plenty of light on the right still so it could be dropped. I would have preferred to cut the spill into the left foreground, but had to move on to the next shot. I do like to bring out textures and I think if you left the towels in a muddy shadow, they would not appear inviting.
I don't have a problem with the direction of the light as the viewer does not see what is off to the left, so why couldn't light be coming from that direction, whether ambient or interior lighting.
I think that interiors for advertising purposes need to be bright as opposed to moody as I think that is what appeals in this market. I appreciate moody ambient light photos (and the speed you can shoot at if not lighting) but don't think this is the market for them and a bit over on the fill is probably safer than under.
David
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Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #32 on: March 06, 2008, 05:27:34 PM »
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Yes I think the light off to the left could be backed off. It was a 1m sq softbox without any cutters etc and I don't like dead, flat areas. The more it is backed off the darker right side gets, and it has plenty of light on the right still so it could be dropped. I would have preferred to cut the spill into the left foreground, but had to move on to the next shot. I do like to bring out textures and I think if you left the towels in a muddy shadow, they would not appear inviting.
I don't have a problem with the direction of the light as the viewer does not see what is off to the left, so why couldn't light be coming from that direction, whether ambient or interior lighting.
I think that interiors for advertising purposes need to be bright as opposed to moody as I think that is what appeals in this market. I appreciate moody ambient light photos (and the speed you can shoot at if not lighting) but don't think this is the market for them and a bit over on the fill is probably safer than under.
David
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179658\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yeah I want really having a go at the picture - one never can really comment on another piece of work when one wasnt there - client pressuring for speed, wanting to show thier products or whatever - I take it this is a hotel room and the 'end punter' (the hotel customer) will want to know 'what they are getting etc

Probably IMO that light needed to be more diffuse and a little less powered

It is interesting that judging by the comments in this thread the higher the budget /better the building and more 'visually literate' the customer the less lighting seems to be required!

This shot (again in a real hurry) has a million flaws but what do you think of the lighting ratio  maybe the darker look goes with the old property..

I think the 'chessboard' optical illusion is really important to consider with lighting against windows, A and B are the same colour



SMM
« Last Edit: March 06, 2008, 05:32:45 PM by Morgan_Moore » Logged

Sam Morgan Moore Cornwall
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David WM
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« Reply #33 on: March 06, 2008, 05:56:33 PM »
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This shot (again in a real hurry) has a million flaws but what do you think of the lighting ratio  maybe the darker look goes with the old property..
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179671\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I think the fill is good, kids look natural. The LR is soft enough to allow you to adjust in pp too.
Would I be right in assuming that the window light is quite subdued? I often have quite severe light from windows, not a chance of seeing flames in fireplaces, which means if I want to preserve the window it takes a fair bit of light.
David
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rainer_v
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« Reply #34 on: March 06, 2008, 06:15:10 PM »
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some more shots without additional lights:
some digital, some with film + drumscan.


[attachment=5475:attachment]
emotion22


[attachment=5476:attachment]
e22 / 2frames stitched


[attachment=5477:attachment]
e75


[attachment=5478:attachment]
4x5" slide


[attachment=5479:attachment]
4x5" neg.

[attachment=5480:attachment]
4x5" slide
« Last Edit: March 06, 2008, 06:36:55 PM by rainer_v » Logged

rainer viertlböck
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munich / germany

www.tangential.de
marc gerritsen
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« Reply #35 on: March 06, 2008, 11:30:54 PM »
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some more of mine
no additional light either
One of the main reason why i would not add any more light is that it just takes too long to set up
2-3 hrs per shot is usually the time i spend in any of the places shown here, I do about 50 set ups in that time and the client might choose about 20 shots with an additional 10 min post pr. per shot.
So all by all including file management shooting and pp I spend 1 day on a regular size apartment.
This is mainly due to not using extra light to still come to a satisfactory result.
cheers
Marc
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stefan marquardt
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« Reply #36 on: March 07, 2008, 01:20:15 AM »
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marc, nice pics - and an amazing speed! what camera-setup do you use when you work that fast?

stefan


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some more of mine
no additional light either
One of the main reason why i would not add any more light is that it just takes too long to set up
2-3 hrs per shot is usually the time i spend in any of the places shown here, I do about 50 set ups in that time and the client might choose about 20 shots with an additional 10 min post pr. per shot.
So all by all including file management shooting and pp I spend 1 day on a regular size apartment.
This is mainly due to not using extra light to still come to a satisfactory result.
cheers
Marc
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179714\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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stefan marquardt
stefanmarquardt.de
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pixjohn
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« Reply #37 on: March 07, 2008, 01:24:14 AM »
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The bottom line, you have to shoot the style you like. My clients would never hirer me if I shot available light, they want the look that I give them. Some space do look good without light and some spaces look bad without any light. I would love to show up with just my camera, take 5 shots and be done by noon but that is not the market i am  in.


[attachment=5490:attachment]
« Last Edit: March 07, 2008, 01:25:23 AM by pixjohn » Logged
marc gerritsen
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« Reply #38 on: March 07, 2008, 04:30:19 AM »
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marc, nice pics - and an amazing speed! what camera-setup do you use when you work that fast?

stefan
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179726\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

to Stefan
thanks!
I use the hasselblad H3D either with the 35 mm or the 50 -110mm lens.
Before that I worked with a Nikon D2x but the files were too small to cover double page spreads.
So my digital shooting system actually came from the nikon set up, which was a radical change from my pentax67.
I think I also go fast as i do not like my client to be present and look over my schoulder all the time
to check every angle,

to John
You are also absolutely right, shooting with or with out lights really depends on so many factors like client's need, personal style etc
The thing though is that I rarely see any cutting edge designed interiors shot with lights like you do, only the more conservative ones, so I for me I quickly equate that shooting style as conservative. But again it all depends on who pays your bills and what they want.  

cheers
Marc
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stefan marquardt
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« Reply #39 on: March 07, 2008, 04:52:52 AM »
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marc, that the same way I work, fast - lots of set ups - no lights.
which is the reason I didnt go with a cambo... but with the zd. I get by with the limited lens-selection for interiors but find it to be more of the problem for exteriors.
how do you shoot your architecture? all just PS-corrected?

stefan


Quote from: marc gerritsen,Mar 7 2008, 05:30 AM
to Stefan
thanks!

I think I also go fast as i do not like my client to be present and look over my schoulder all the time
to check every angle,
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stefan marquardt
stefanmarquardt.de
architecture & interior photography
www.stefanmarquardt-architekturbild.de
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