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Author Topic: Lighting Architecture  (Read 36982 times)
Chris Livsey
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« Reply #40 on: March 07, 2008, 05:13:19 AM »
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I do like to bring out textures and I think if you left the towels in a muddy shadow, they would not appear inviting.
David
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That point is well taken. Thanks for the "fill in" on the technique. With your descriptions we don't need a lighting diagram. I also acknowledge the time, and client, pressures leading to: I don't want to say compromises but you know what I mean. Perfection is a very expensive
 in time and money.
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« Reply #41 on: March 11, 2008, 04:31:54 AM »
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Talking about perfection.
How to deal with reflections in windows? Has anybody a good tip to remove this? I tried it with pol filters but you can’t remove all of the reflections.
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stefan marquardt
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« Reply #42 on: March 11, 2008, 04:51:38 AM »
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Talking about perfection.
How to deal with reflections in windows? Has anybody a good tip to remove this? I tried it with pol filters but you can’t remove all of the reflections.
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after taking the shoots with flash, I always take one without flash. than overlay the two frames in ps and remove any reflections.

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stefan marquardt
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« Reply #43 on: March 11, 2008, 04:57:38 AM »
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^^ Thanks. That’s what I also do. But sometimes you see yourself even on daytime in the window or other horrible reflections from the furniture.
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free1000
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« Reply #44 on: March 11, 2008, 07:06:08 PM »
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some more of mine
no additional light either
One of the main reason why i would not add any more light is that it just takes too long to set up
2-3 hrs per shot is usually the time i spend in any of the places shown here, I do about 50 set ups in that time and the client might choose about 20 shots with an additional 10 min post pr. per shot.
So all by all including file management shooting and pp I spend 1 day on a regular size apartment.
This is mainly due to not using extra light to still come to a satisfactory result.
cheers
Marc
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I'm intrigued by the maths here.  If your client chooses 20 shots, and you spend 10 mins on pp per shot this amounts to 200 minutes.

You mention 2-3 hours per shot. So I assume you must mean per 'shoot'.  You then say 50 set ups. Which to me means variations in styling, angle... etc.

I like your pictures but your arithmetic confuses the hell out of me!
 
I can only assume that you have a stylist that operates at the speed of a tornado, or that the owners of these palaces have a retinue of maids who have been hard at work before you arrive.
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pixjohn
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« Reply #45 on: March 11, 2008, 07:51:52 PM »
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I see the bigger picture. I might take 2-3 hours per shot, and you take 2-3 hours to shoot the whole project, but I get 5 - 8 days of work to your 1 day.

Quote
some more of mine
no additional light either
One of the main reason why i would not add any more light is that it just takes too long to set up
2-3 hrs per shot is usually the time i spend in any of the places shown here, I do about 50 set ups in that time and the client might choose about 20 shots with an additional 10 min post pr. per shot.
So all by all including file management shooting and pp I spend 1 day on a regular size apartment.
This is mainly due to not using extra light to still come to a satisfactory result.
cheers
Marc
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david o
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« Reply #46 on: March 16, 2008, 11:49:35 PM »
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the second shot was done with daylight
the first was done at night no light at all, I didn't want to have any tungsten light around so it was dark the only light was the laptop and sure flash in the window and one bounce to the ceiling.

the set up is different but it the same spot in the room
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marc gerritsen
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« Reply #47 on: March 17, 2008, 05:26:41 PM »
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sorry for the confusion typo; indeed it should be a 2-3 hrs shoot instead of shot
so
2-3 hrs shoot
50 set ups
client buys 20-25 shots
10min per shot for pp
so all by all one day
Everything is set up before I arrive done by either the owner, designer or maid and I might move a piece of furniture in or out of position or other tiny detailing

to pix john
While you work for 8 days I also work for 8 days as I work virtually non stop here in Asia.
There are just too many projects here to document and allthough I also would like to take longer per shoot there are so may clients knocking on my door just because I can deliver this fast.
When shooting this much I also end up with an enormous amount of stock which hopefully will return a passive income over the following years.  I am not trying to pull one over you as I know we just work in different styles which both work for us. I would probably get bored with an 8 day shoot in the same place with while you might get absolutely frazzled if you had to work the same way I do.
cheers
marc





 
Quote
I'm intrigued by the maths here.  If your client chooses 20 shots, and you spend 10 mins on pp per shot this amounts to 200 minutes.

You mention 2-3 hours per shot. So I assume you must mean per 'shoot'.  You then say 50 set ups. Which to me means variations in styling, angle... etc.

I like your pictures but your arithmetic confuses the hell out of me!
 
I can only assume that you have a stylist that operates at the speed of a tornado, or that the owners of these palaces have a retinue of maids who have been hard at work before you arrive.
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pixjohn
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« Reply #48 on: March 17, 2008, 06:03:02 PM »
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Marc, Your right on the fact we both give what our clients demand. If my clients wanted available light photography, I would give them what they wanted. In the long run I might have to modify my work if the housing market continues to take a bigger dive. I think most of the market has gone available light or small lighting set up purely on financial numbers not just artistic look.
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haefnerphoto
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« Reply #49 on: March 17, 2008, 07:26:43 PM »
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Here's some recent work of mine.  The interiors and exteriors are the same house taken about a week apart.  My style of working seems to be a combination of the two styles most recently shown.  I take about a hour and a half (on average) to shoot an interior with anywhere from 30-90 minutes in post.  I thought I was working pretty fast, apparently I'm not.  My approach is to compliment the existing light whenever possible, open shadows, dark woods, etc.  The living room overhead was dead so I placed a 1000 watt lamp outside to emulate a setting sun.  I think it helped.  Again on the stair shot, a 1k to the left to highlight the plant and cast a few shadows.  Then lots of clean up, straightening and layer blending.  Jim
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free1000
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« Reply #50 on: March 18, 2008, 02:11:06 AM »
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sorry for the confusion typo; indeed it should be a 2-3 hrs shoot instead of shot
so
2-3 hrs shoot
50 set ups
client buys 20-25 shots
10min per shot for pp
so all by all one day
Everything is set up before I arrive done by either the owner, designer or maid and I might move a piece of furniture in or out of position or other tiny detailing

Ok, thats interesting.  I think that there are some good aspects to working like this in terms of the variation you get.

You are fortunate I think that you have places of such richness as your subject matter. Too often I find myself asked to make one of the ugly sisters look like cinderella. Of course that takes a lot of time, and then... it just looks like the ugly sister with a smart frock.

I think that the fact that the client picks the number of shots gives them a feeling of ownership as well. I see that as an advantage.
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« Reply #51 on: March 18, 2008, 02:30:56 AM »
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Here's some recent work of mine.  The interiors and exteriors are the same house taken about a week apart.  My style of working seems to be a combination of the two styles most recently shown.  I take about a hour and a half (on average) to shoot an interior with anywhere from 30-90 minutes in post.  I thought I was working pretty fast, apparently I'm not.  My approach is to compliment the existing light whenever possible, open shadows, dark woods, etc.  The living room overhead was dead so I placed a 1000 watt lamp outside to emulate a setting sun.  I think it helped.  Again on the stair shot, a 1k to the left to highlight the plant and cast a few shadows.  Then lots of clean up, straightening and layer blending.  Jim
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Hi Jim,

Lovely images. I was wondering did you use your Mamiya 28mm lens on any of these images.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
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free1000
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« Reply #52 on: March 18, 2008, 02:52:23 AM »
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Here's some recent work of mine.  The interiors and exteriors are the same house taken about a week apart.  My style of working seems to be a combination of the two styles most recently shown.  I take about a hour and a half (on average) to shoot an interior with anywhere from 30-90 minutes in post.  I thought I was working pretty fast, apparently I'm not.  My approach is to compliment the existing light whenever possible, open shadows, dark woods, etc.  The living room overhead was dead so I placed a 1000 watt lamp outside to emulate a setting sun.  I think it helped.  Again on the stair shot, a 1k to the left to highlight the plant and cast a few shadows.  Then lots of clean up, straightening and layer blending.  Jim
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Nice images. Gorgeous house.  Do you use strobes as well?
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haefnerphoto
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« Reply #53 on: March 18, 2008, 07:24:54 AM »
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Yes, I did use the 28mm on the majority of images.  I've found it to be indispensable on shoots like this.  Also, I use strobes for fill, usually popped into the ceiling or a Chimera to the side of the camera.  My assistant has been with me eight years and is pretty quick, still I can't come close to the fifty different shots in 3 hours, I'm very impressed with Marc's photography and approach.  Jim
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Streetwise
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« Reply #54 on: March 18, 2008, 10:24:06 AM »
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Yes, I did use the 28mm on the majority of images.  I've found it to be indispensable on shoots like this.  Also, I use strobes for fill, usually popped into the ceiling or a Chimera to the side of the camera.  My assistant has been with me eight years and is pretty quick, still I can't come close to the fifty different shots in 3 hours, I'm very impressed with Marc's photography and approach.  Jim
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Jim,

Awesome work. I too prefer to go with minimal lighting, but to supplement where necessary. It all depends on so many factors, really. But it seems that the architect clients put so much time into their own lighting (for interiors) that it can interfere with "the look" they've created to bring in too much external lighting. Sometime you can't help it though. But then again, there's bracketing and layer masks for a lot of those issues...

I'm curious to know what back you're using?  What I wouldn't give to be able to trade in my CamboWide for a 28mm lens.... Seems that's the way to go.


Dave
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« Reply #55 on: March 18, 2008, 01:10:16 PM »
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I'm curious to know what back you're using?  What I wouldn't give to be able to trade in my CamboWide for a 28mm lens.... Seems that's the way to go.
Dave

Why is that? The Cambo Wide has a nice 24XL Schneider. Or you can go for the Rodenstock 28mm if you want to spend a bit more than the Mamiya!
 
Just curious.

It would be interesting to share tips for rapid use of the Cambo Wide.  Here are two of mine that may be obvious... any others?

1) I bought separate voigtlander viewfinders for each of my lenses and keep them with the respective lens. But mostly on interiors I leave the 47XL on and only use a wider one when I can't find a solution on the 47.

2) I keep a separate shutter release cable attached to each lens so that I don't need to do changes.

3) I keep a lee filter adapter on each lens, fitted with the white overcaps. At a push I can shoot a white balance shot through this as well.
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haefnerphoto
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« Reply #56 on: March 18, 2008, 07:06:59 PM »
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I use the P45 which last time I checked had over 33,000 captures on it.  The Mamiya 28mm for the 645 is a tremendous piece of equipment.  I do find it exhibits some barrel distortion but very little compared to the 35mm and is easily corrected.  I do consider getting a digital view camera because there aren't any really wide lenses in the 645 format that shift or tilt but so far the need hasn't been that pressing.  Hopefully someone will make a 28-35 that does shift and tilt, at that point, from my point of view, view cameras will be obsolete.  Jim
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« Reply #57 on: March 19, 2008, 07:09:12 AM »
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I guess for me, the Cambo Wide is very clunky. For every shot, I have to pre-create a custom gain file (to remove color cast); often two files if I shift right and left. Of course to do all of that, you have to be tethered which presents slowdown problems of it's own. So by the time you get everything set, you might have missed the the light dropping down behind the horizon; or severely limited the number of angles one could capture in that magic window when the light is at it's best. Interiors are a little better fortunately.

I guess what I'm saying is that I'm finding that the Cambo is "technical heavy" and robs serious time away from the "art". It just appears to me that a 28mm on the 645AFD would again allow for maximum on "art", minimum of "technical". And with PS stitching, it makes it even that much better.  Does that make sense?

I don't own any glass for the Cambo, just the body/mount, so I'm not heavily invested yet. But it's always a pain to rent.


Jim - on your P45, have you experienced any color cast issues? How is that back on longer exposures for the architectural work? Thoughts of upgrading to the P45+?

Thanks

Dave
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free1000
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« Reply #58 on: March 19, 2008, 07:27:31 AM »
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I guess for me, the Cambo Wide is very clunky. For every shot, I have to pre-create a custom gain file (to remove color cast); often two files if I shift right and left. Of course to do all of that, you have to be tethered which presents slowdown problems of it's own.
You don't need to be tethered if you want to shoot the custom gain, but you do have to then post-process the custom gain files after getting back to base.

You are right about the technical issue though. Unless you become very adept with a camera like this, its possible to lose the intuitive feel.

I've spent quite a lot of time becoming familiar, often testing extensively just to become 'one with the machine' so I don't have to think about it in a hurry.
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haefnerphoto
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« Reply #59 on: March 19, 2008, 04:16:48 PM »
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I'm getting my threads mixed up, I just answered some of the above questions in Recent Works.  Oh well.  Anyways, no I haven't had a color cast problem with the Mamiya lenses.  When I shoot with the Flex-adaptor and wide lenses it is an issue but certainly can be resolved in Capture One.  I wasn't interested in the upgrade to the P45+ because the main advantage was live preview and that isn't that important to me.  A larger sensor (or more pixels) would get my attention, although file size hasn't been an issue either so far.  A really wide, tilt-shift lens would also be on my wish list.  Jim
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