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Author Topic: Joby Gorillapod  (Read 8790 times)
peter.doerrie
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« on: March 05, 2008, 05:59:50 AM »
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HI there,

has anybody the Joby Gorillapod in regualar usage? I am curently searching for a possibility to get more out of my photos while doing longer (2-4 weeks) hikes and while traveling. As I do not want to carry a full featured tripod (my backpack is allways to heavy) I do not have great amounts of money to spend I figured, that the combination of the Gorillapod and a medium ballhead would be a good compromise.
Has anybody experiences with this setup?

Cheers,

Peter
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2008, 09:47:26 AM »
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No, but please report your experience if you buy one.
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Rob C
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« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2008, 11:00:00 AM »
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No, but please report your experience if you buy one.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179308\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

An interesting example of inter-species co-operation, but I have a sneaking suspicion that the RSPCA will intervene at any moment.

However, I, too, would be interested in seeing the results, which could be most encouraging to that other ongoing experiment: the creation of a new, modern, politically correct works of Shakespeare (so much more cognizant of contemporary sensibilities), currently being created in a secret location quite near you via the combined talents of a school of monkeys. I am told that one recently peripatetic Mr Blair, well versed in the manners of both lap-dogs and political monkeys has agreed, for a small fee, to write a brief forward to this oevre. I can hardly wait.

Ciao - Rob C
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eyebeam
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« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2008, 12:42:10 PM »
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I have one and used it for backpacking and hiking in Maine last summer.

The tripod struggles to be stable with a Canon 5D and a 20-70mm zoom lens. It also struggles to remain stationary for multiple exposures. The tripod also has the capability to wrap its legs around a small tree or branch to get some elevation, but again, the weight of the 5D and lens causes the tripod to creep.

On the other hand, I have also used the tripod with a smaller point and shoot camera and it is very stable and works fine. When using the small camera, I first attach a mini ball head (for flashes)  to the tripod, and then attach the camera to the ball head. It is a lot easier to level the camera using the little ball head attachment.

Be prepared to lay on the ground, or search for a suitable rock, or tree, that can give you the position and perspective you seek.
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peter.doerrie
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« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2008, 12:53:20 PM »
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...
The tripod struggles to be stable with a Canon 5D and a 20-70mm zoom lens. It also struggles to remain stationary for multiple exposures. The tripod also has the capability to wrap its legs around a small tree or branch to get some elevation, but again, the weight of the 5D and lens causes the tripod to creep.
...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179353\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Do you have the biggest version of the pod? Because the manufacturer says it would support up to 3kg (6 pounds). And I cant imagine that a 5D with a 20-70 mm zoom is heavier than that.

But thanks a lot for your comment.
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2008, 04:32:42 PM »
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An interesting example of inter-species co-operation, but I have a sneaking suspicion that the RSPCA will intervene at any moment.

However, I, too, would be interested in seeing the results, which could be most encouraging to that other ongoing experiment: the creation of a new, modern, politically correct works of Shakespeare (so much more cognizant of contemporary sensibilities), currently being created in a secret location quite near you via the combined talents of a school of monkeys. I am told that one recently peripatetic Mr Blair, well versed in the manners of both lap-dogs and political monkeys has agreed, for a small fee, to write a brief forward to this oevre. I can hardly wait.

Ciao - Rob C
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179330\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Hi Robsie,

There is already a billion monkeys at a billion keyboards and the WWW is nothing like Shakespeare.
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eyebeam
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« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2008, 02:39:54 AM »
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Do you have the biggest version of the pod? Because the manufacturer says it would support up to 3kg (6 pounds). And I cant imagine that a 5D with a 20-70 mm zoom is heavier than that.

But thanks a lot for your comment.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179357\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yep, I have the biggest version of the tripod. The tripod will be steady if one balances the camera on the tripod and you set it on the ground, or a rock. The angles of the legs have to be adjusted just right to have this stability. So the advertising is true. However, the tripod will not keep the camera in exactly the same position for multiple exposures of the same scene.

I often found that I wanted to take pictures that were not so close to the ground, so I would wrap the tripod legs around a small tree. The camera position often experienced creep as the legs relaxed their grip around the tree.
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Rob C
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« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2008, 03:16:47 AM »
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Hi Robsie,

There is already a billion monkeys at a billion keyboards and the WWW is nothing like Shakespeare.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=179406\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Give it time, Mr P, give it time!

Rob C
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JDClements
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« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2008, 04:57:55 PM »
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I used the largest Joby Gorillapod for around a year (called "Gorillapod SLR Zoom") with a Rebel XTi w/battery grip and a Sigma 17-70 lens. I put it on rocks, stumps, benches, and wrapped it around vertical trees, on fences, etc. No problem, it worked like a charm. I used it with one of those little $50 ballheads.

The thing works great and is perfect for backpacking with. I just slid one of the legs into the little strap on the side of my sling pack, although it would get some stares because it looks kind of unusual on the pack.
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geesbert
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« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2008, 05:10:44 AM »
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i found it lacking for any camera larger than a point and shoot.
i have the biggest one and it was useless with a 5d, now i use it from time to time as a clamp to mount a strobe onto things...
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cecelia
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« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2008, 10:23:18 AM »
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I looked at one a few weeks ago to use with a D3, but found it not stable enough.   I agree with others' comments that it could work well for a lightweight camera - point and click or even a small DSLR with a kit lens.
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erictoddjohnson
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« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2008, 06:07:29 PM »
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I have the large Gorillapod (SLR model) and I've been using it with a Canon 20D and the 17-85 or 10-22 lenses.  [The 70-200 f/4 L is a little too heavy.]  I put a Manfrotto 484 ballhead on it and have had good results with this setup, both using it as a freestanding tripod and wrapping the legs around railings, fences, etc.  I have not tried tree branches.  

Depending on the surface texture and geometry of the railing I have occasionally had to deal with some slipping, but that can usually be controlled by a light touch on one of the legs.   I wouldn't want to use it for multiple exposures where precise alignment is critical, but I can get a 13x19 print from a long exposure with no discernable camera shake pretty consistently.  The Gorillapod is certainly not as stable as a full-size tripod, but I find it to be a good compromise when portability is key.
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2008, 12:14:50 PM »
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I have an equivalent device, though instead of flexible legs it has three short rigid legs (that fold together rather like a regular tripod's legs) plus an attached velcro strap.  The velcro strap ties it around tree limbs and the like, possibly with less creep than a gorillapod's legs; the rigid legs for resting on surfaces certainly don't creep and wobble the way a gorillapod's would.  It sounds like it does the same thing but probably better.  I don't remember what its name was (I got it about ten years ago), but I can look it up when I get home if anyone's interested.

Lisa
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macgyver
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« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2008, 04:15:34 PM »
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Lisa, I'd be interested.

I'm glad this thread is going. I might buy one of these suckers for an upcoming trip where I dont think I'll be able to have a full scale tripod with me. If it could hold my 40 and 28 1.8 or 16-35 I'd be happy.

It seems like people are split on here, 1/2 love it 1/2 dont. I have a friend who has used one extensively for his 5d and loves his.
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2008, 07:55:18 PM »
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macgyver, I went web-searching for the name on my mini-tripod, and found that (despite the fact that I got mine about a decade ago) it's still being made.  Here it is for sale on amazon, with an image of it being used as a tripod:

http://www.amazon.com/Pedco-UltraPod-II-Li...a/dp/B000ANCPNM

The manufacturer's web site has an image of it being used tied to a tree trunk with the velcro strap:

http://www.pedcopods.com/

I've used a medium-sized SLR with a small-to-medium lens on it without any problems.

Lisa

P.S.  I noticed that the five people who reviewed it on amazon all gave it maximum stars.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2008, 07:57:00 PM by nniko » Logged

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