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Author Topic: Mounting Canvas on Chipboard or Similar  (Read 3725 times)
nickdavis
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« on: March 15, 2008, 05:58:05 PM »
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I need to mount a canvas print to something relatively thin, and my only experience is with stretching. I was going to use chipboard but a framer we sometimes use says foam board would be better.

Does anyone here mount canvas on anything solid? If so, what is the best way to go?

Thanks!
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kdphotography
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« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2008, 06:16:38 PM »
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I need to mount a canvas print to something relatively thin, and my only experience is with stretching. I was going to use chipboard but a framer we sometimes use says foam board would be better.

Does anyone here mount canvas on anything solid? If so, what is the best way to go?

Thanks!
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It sounds like you need to "wet" mount the canvas print. I would not use regular foam core---it will warp.  Use gatorboard to wet mount canvas prints.
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Dward
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« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2008, 10:01:15 PM »
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I need to mount a canvas print to something relatively thin, and my only experience is with stretching. I was going to use chipboard but a framer we sometimes use says foam board would be better.

Does anyone here mount canvas on anything solid? If so, what is the best way to go?

Thanks!
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=181791\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


I glue hardboard (masonite or similar) to a canvas strainer and then trim with a router.  Then I mount the canvas print to the masonite surface with an acid-free glue, Mighty Muck.  When the glue has dried, I wrap the edges of the canvas around the sides of the strainer and staple to the back.

Mounting on foam core is not a good idea with canvas.  Most glues will shrink as they dry and cause the foam core to warp.  Gatorfoam will work OK, though it's expensive.

I like the masonite solution because it's stable, inexpensive, and durable (canvas on panel is less easily damaged than stretched canvas).

David V. Ward, Ph. D.
www.dvward.com
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karrphoto
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« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2008, 10:59:31 PM »
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If not "Mighty Muck" use what we that do bookbindings use.  PVA glue.

Search talasonline.com for Jade 403 or Jade 711 I believe.  Both the same thing, 711 is less odor.   VERY good bonding glue used for book binding so very applicable.

I second using hardboard.  You can pick up a 2x4 piece or many other sizes usually at the local home improvement story.  Most cary 1/16, 1/8 and 1/4 Masonite (hardboard)
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Craig Murphy
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2008, 12:55:15 PM »
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What is a 'canvas strainer'.  Is Mighty Muck the same type of adhesive as Yes Paste?  Masonite is a good material to use?  Not quite acid free.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2008, 01:00:49 PM by Craig Murphy » Logged

CMurph
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« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2008, 02:13:25 PM »
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What is a 'canvas strainer'.  Is Mighty Muck the same type of adhesive as Yes Paste?  Masonite is a good material to use?  Not quite acid free.
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Don't know what the strainer is... but...

Masonite isn't acid free, correct.  I just took my PH pen and rubbed it on and it came out Yellow (acidic)  Archival, I'd guess you'd have to use Sintra, which would be just like Masonite and comes in 3mm and 6mm thicknesses, possibly more.  I think PiedmontPLastics.com carries it, if not, just search google for Sintra Mounting Board.  

A note about Masonite.. some album MFG's like Zookbinders use it for their covers.  Now, the covers only really touch leather... but you would think if they use it, they would had tested it to know what was good/bad.  Maybe they know something about Masonite we don't?
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Dward
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« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2008, 09:06:16 PM »
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What is a 'canvas strainer'.  Is Mighty Muck the same type of adhesive as Yes Paste?  Masonite is a good material to use?  Not quite acid free.
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Mighty Muck is an acid free glue with a long working time, which allows for repositioning if needed.  It's available at framing supply companies--it's often used to wrap mats in fabric, for example.  

Masonite is NOT acid free, but with the coating of glue in between the masonite and the canvas, the canvas is effectively isolated from direct contact with the acidic masonite. It also helps that the canvas is not behind glass---so any outgassing is not contained.

It's also possible to laminate an acid free substrate to the masonite (something like acid free matboard or Tyvek, and then glue the canvas to that substrate.

A canvas strainer is the same as a stretcher---the frame on which the canvas is mounted.

David V. Ward, Ph. D.
www.dvward.com
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bill t.
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« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2008, 01:36:18 AM »
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I recently saw some old silver prints that were wrapped on Masonite using wallpaper paste and techniques in 70's.  Most of these still look fine.  A few show minor yellowing which I attribute to bad fixing/washing, and one has a small area of paper that has separated from the board.  Wouldn't advise that sort of wallpapering for an inkjet print, but I suspect the acidic properties of Masonite are not much of an issue at least on the 30 year horizon.

FWIW in the 70's time there was a type of Masonite available that had something like a polished wax coating, maybe it was for moisture shielding.  It was not glue-able.  Don't know what's available now, anybody have any input on this?
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