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Author Topic: Please comment my photo  (Read 2938 times)
Mark D Segal
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« on: March 02, 2005, 12:57:14 PM »
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Dear K. Narongsak,

Thank you for the opportunity of viewing your on-line portfolios. I think you are being very modest, in true Thai tradition, may I say? You have many photos that DO WOW. I think you have a strong sense of composition, colour and light - this shows through particularly well in some of those night shots of Rappongi, which are not so easy to get right. These also show that you have a good command of dynamic range (managing brightness from shadows to highlights). You asked about areas of improvement - the most immediate thing that comes to mind is that you do have some photos where one wonders what the purpose, or center of interest might be, but those are the minority. Best of luck with your stay in Japan - it is so rich in photographic opportunity, as is your home country.  

Regards,

Mark
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
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« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2005, 02:53:50 PM »
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Hello DiaAzul,

Well it definitely does have a compositional theme, certainly more intriguing than a straight shot of the Chateau and I fully agree with you that it will not win any award. Looking at how the image is dominated by that big well focused lump of sculptured metal, it kind of reminded me of John Berger's critique of Picasso - essentially along the lines that he was a superb artist in search of something to say. Of course this is a personal thing - that gatepost cap just doesn't inspire me - but who am I, and as they say: "chacun a son gout". I think K.Narongsak is up to something different: trying to convey the mood and character of his environment, and I can't help thinking that a fair number of his images do this quite effectively, though I agree that a number of them don't make the winner's list because they lack a center of interest, be it on account of choice of subject matter or composition, or I suspect more likely both inter-actively. But for someone who has been at this for only about two years, I still say Bravo and like you encourage him to keep photographing.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
narongsak_rat
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« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2005, 11:06:05 AM »
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Dear K. Mark
I am very very surprised and happy that you know very well my home country and Thai tradition. †
I am also happy that you like the photos of Roppongi. It was difficult for me to handheld the camera in such poor lighting conditions and make correct exposure.
I totally agree with your comments on my gallery. After I read your suggestion. I looked at several photos in my gallery and found that many of them lack interest. †I will try to improve †next time. †
Thank you very much for your suggestion and warm encouragement. †

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Dear DiaAzul,
I will try to reduce the number of photos, which lack interests.
Thank you very much for your suggestion.

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Dear paulbk,
I am happy that you enjoyed photos in my gallery. †I really love the National Geographic style, but I am still far away.
I will keep my attempt for improvement. †Thank you
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narongsak_rat
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« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2005, 09:46:51 AM »
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I am working in Japan and started photography since 2003.
I love travelling and taking photo. But I felt I have no Wow photo.
So please give me your advices for my future improvement.

my gallery is

http://www.pbase.com/narongsak_rat

Sorry for my poor english
Thank you
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DiaAzul
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« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2005, 01:38:27 PM »
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If I may humbly offer a couple of suggestions:

(i) In your pbase web gallery change the style sheet to one where it easy easier to scan the thumbnails. The current style sheet that you are using looks fancy, however, it is very difficult to get a true feel for your images.

(ii) Go through each of your galleries and pick out the best 8-12 pictures. Throw away those pictures you haven't chosen - though think carefully what it is that you like about the ones you have kept and those you have thrown away. If necessary throw away all the pictures in all galleries and just keep your best 12 or so. By keeping the number of pictures small you can keep the average quality high. Over a period of time you will be able to grow the number of pictures you keep by understanding what it is that helped you take the better pictures.

(iii) Keep it simple and keep it clear. You need to work harder on your composition to (a) make it much clearer to the viewer what the focus of the pictue is and ( eliminate distractions that weaken the overall composition. Too many of your images are of the 'broad view of a scene' type with no clear visual elements to lead the viewer into the image, hold their attention and engage the viewer emotionally.

(iv) Think different. I can best explain this with an example. At the weekend I went with some friend to visit a Chateau close to Paris. The natural reaction is to take a view of the front, the courtyard, the buildings. However, I felt that this would lead to the typical 'happy snappy' tourist type of shots with little to differentiate it from any other tourist who would take a picture. Instead I decided to work on a compositional theme that I am developing with an object in the nearground set in the context of an out of focus background. Whilst this picture isn't necessarily going to win awards it has more impact than a straight shot of the chateau. I have focused on the ball (using the 1/3 rule to position it in the frame) then balanced it up with the out of focus person to the right. It is by not taking the expected shot and focusing on some compositional theme that you will develop your photographic skills.



Your off to a good start, I would suggest to keep looking at other peoples images and seeing what works (how they use distance to subject, lighting, point of view, perspective, depth of field) and try and build it into your own work. Get a good book on composition and follow closely what they have to say. And finally keep taking pictures.
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David Plummer    http://photo.tanzo.org/
paulbk
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2005, 05:58:12 PM »
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Dear narongsak_rat,
I know very little about photography, and less about wine. But I know what I like in both. And I enjoyed your photographs. There are as many reasons to take photographs as there are photographers. For me, I like the National Geographic style. I like photographs that help me learn about a place with just enough artistic license to make in interesting. I like photographs that tell a story and capture the mood of the moment. My brain is not sophisticated enough appreciate ďartĒ photographs that have to be figured out. I think Michael Rís work is very much in the National Geographic style. They have impact without being presumptuous. Itís not easy to turn away from one of Michaelís photographs. And as we know, to make such a photo is much more difficult than it looks. The art is in making something difficult look easy. Like ballet. I think you are headed in that direction. Good work.
paul
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paul b. kramarchyk
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Brian Gilkes
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« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2005, 08:08:29 PM »
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Dear K Narongsak,
Your images are very pleasant but it is good that you want to go further.You could increase impact in some by getting closer, which simplifies by reducing complexity and repetition.
Also often it is best to take fewer images and wait at the same spot for the light to reveal more.
There are many great artists from Japan who have followed this approach.
I find the study of great artists extreme useful in improving my own work. I suppose I hope something will "rub off".
Best Wishes,
Brian Gilkes.
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