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Author Topic: Concert Photographers...  (Read 24207 times)
daethon
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« Reply #20 on: April 08, 2008, 07:58:14 PM »
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A problem with 'creative' shots IMHO is they're harder to sell to what should be, but isn't a creative type of magazine.

Over the years my agency sales have very much leaned towards 3/4 length portraits of lead singers.

So you might find that with the big bands you're only allowed the first 3 songs when your starting out and wont have time for much else..

You can make money with music photography is you have good syndication and build up a good library of stuff for sale, though it does take time for regular money to roll in.

To get started any publication that will credit your photos and get you access to the gigs is worth it's weight in gold.

You can also try getting to know the venues and their operators with a view to getting regular access on their behalf.
Most venues here in OZ have regular photographers.

Good luck !
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I've found that my clients also, are really just looking for what you described.  But that shouldn't limit me from using the rest of the time to enjoy myself.
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jjj
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« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2008, 09:57:16 AM »
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A problem with 'creative' shots IMHO is they're harder to sell to what should be, but isn't a creative type of magazine.
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By creative, read good not wacky/way out and what I meant was you need to be creative to get good shots. Good shots stand out as they capture the event/produce an iconic image. And music mags would love to use great pics, but if they aren't being taken.... In the UK the NME used to have some brilliant [music] photographers working for them, now they seem to be colour snaps. Penny Smith, Anton Corbijn, Derek Ridgers, Steve Pyke are a few I remember. Anton Corbijn just directed the justly acclaimed 'Control' about Joy Division.
But with the stupid 3 song rule there's no wonder there's a lack of good concert photography around. Good photography usually takes some time and consideration and normally the main difference between an amateur and a professional is the time spend getting the shot. Bands or far more likely, idiot tour managers are not doing themselves any favours by this moronic ruling.
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jjj
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« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2008, 09:59:02 AM »
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The microphone directly over the guitar player's head kinda ruins it for me...mikes are a necessary evil, but can be a real PITA to shoot around. The main thing is to prevent them from obscuring the performer's face too much.


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God I hated mikes! On stands that is. Hand held can be interesting.
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Ken Alexander
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« Reply #23 on: April 18, 2008, 01:03:28 AM »
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Are there any professional concert photographers on this forum?  about a year ago I did about 7 concerts, local bands, and really enjoyed the work, but found it hard to locate clients, and had other things take priority. 

I am what I'd call a semi-professional.  I make some money occasionally, but most of the time I am a serious enthusiast.  No level of schooling, no real training other than trial and error.  I'm curious what advice you'd give to someone in this field, what experiences/stories taught you the most about this type of photography.  I've read a couple books, the last one being Concert Photography by Sievert.  I had a lot of fun doing it, but found my shots to be rather repetitive after the fourth show.  Since I was shooting different subjects each time, and mostly bands that didn't have much stage presence, they all felt the same, nothing special. 

Any and all comments are welcome.  If you feel like looking at the work I've done, and commenting, that's great, Concerts
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I read this thread with great interest earlier this week because I got my first opportunity to shoot a concert just a few nights ago.  When I got home afterward I concluded that landscape photography is easier (trees and mountains tend not to jump around so much!), but this was great fun.

I learned a lot about using my D80, especially about how to use my autofocus in the future; I have hundreds of photos of perfectly sharp mic stands and cymbols with out-of-focus guitar players and drummers behind them.  Next time will be much more productive.

My intention was to end up with some raw, gritty looking black and white images.  Shooting at ISO 1600 helped a lot with the fritty feeling...maybe too much!  My focusing problems may have inadvertently helped too, but see for yourself below.  Comments are most welcome.

Ken
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fnagy
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« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2008, 07:50:04 PM »
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By creative, read good not wacky/way out and what I meant was you need to be creative to get good shots. Good shots stand out as they capture the event/produce an iconic image. And music mags would love to use great pics, but if they aren't being taken.... In the UK the NME used to have some brilliant [music] photographers working for them, now they seem to be colour snaps. Penny Smith, Anton Corbijn, Derek Ridgers, Steve Pyke are a few I remember. Anton Corbijn just directed the justly acclaimed 'Control' about Joy Division.
But with the stupid 3 song rule there's no wonder there's a lack of good concert photography around. Good photography usually takes some time and consideration and normally the main difference between an amateur and a professional is the time spend getting the shot. Bands or far more likely, idiot tour managers are not doing themselves any favours by this moronic ruling.
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Some excellent points!  

I have been shooting Jazz Music scene for about 7 yrs. (personal work, jazz musicians are really poor!)  After about 3-4 yrs of shooting I looked at Francis Wolff's work, man it blew me away, why? because he worked with them in all different settings, Being with Bluenote was convenient and very intimate. Share with the musicians, help when you can and they will in return.

When $$$ is involved the problem that I have run across is that any schmuck can get a digi cam, whatever type? and get the same old tired shit, but it's free, and the music scene being what it is, takes anything that is free and they can cut costs?  So any work that you do to capture the event even though it's better than 99%, it get lost in the sea of mediocrity.  

To get the truly good shots and the ones that might generate some interest, you need to get close to your subjects and preferably back stage etc.  you need to establish your creds with them and they might even let you use flash (flashes?) and give you the creative freedom to get the shots that you want.  You still won't make much money, but it could be fun!
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Frank
daethon
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« Reply #25 on: May 04, 2008, 02:48:30 AM »
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From a concert tonight.  Not spectacular but really captures the singer's personality.

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jjj
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« Reply #26 on: May 05, 2008, 02:55:51 PM »
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From a concert tonight.  Not spectacular but really captures the singer's personality.
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But think how much better it would have been if you had framed image vertically.
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daethon
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« Reply #27 on: May 05, 2008, 05:31:50 PM »
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But think how much better it would have been if you had framed image vertically.
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Agreed, just one problem.  The Venue I was at is a real pain when it comes to seeing something that looks "professional."  So I could only take the 50mm f/1.4 on the 20D.  Even then, they stopped me from taking any more pictures "Only point and shoots" allowed.  

With as close as I was to the stage the best that I could do with that vertically was the below.  Ideally I would have had the 24mm with me, but that lens was too large for me to get into the venue.  

I agree with you completely though.


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dseelig
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« Reply #28 on: May 08, 2008, 03:34:54 PM »
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Keep the mikes out of the face get a little angle. Mike eater shots never work. If whole band shots get their feet in the shotscropping half way and having a ton of ceiling in the shots does not work I have shot alot of music my website www.davidseelig.com
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Agreed, just one problem. The Venue I was at is a real pain when it comes to seeing something that looks "professional." So I could only take the 50mm f/1.4 on the 20D. Even then, they stopped me from taking any more pictures "Only point and shoots" allowed.

With as close as I was to the stage the best that I could do with that vertically was the below. Ideally I would have had the 24mm with me, but that lens was too large for me to get into the venue.

I agree with you completely though.

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« Last Edit: May 08, 2008, 03:36:24 PM by dseelig » Logged
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